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CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Also in Great Britain, United States, West Indies, South Africa and Australia. 



f i 



HARDWARE-METAL 

A Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 

Office of Publication, 10 Front Street East, Toronto. 



VOL. XIX. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, AUGUST 3, 1907 



NO. 31. 



"QUEEN'S HEAD" 
SHEETS 

BLACK GALVANIZED 

The highest grade on the market. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO. Lid , MONTREAL 
Bristol, Newport and Montreal Managers, Canadian Branch. 




* CUTLEkW 



For Sale by leading Wholesale Hardware Houses 




Manufacturers who claim perfection for their wares 
are aplenty. We let the practical men of Canada — 
the men who know- make all the claims which we 
print regarding the 



kk 



SOVEREIGN BOILER 



They— the men who know- declare that the Sovereign 
Boiler is just as near perfect as human ingenuity can 
make a boiler, and add that it is the nucleus of as per- 
fect a heating system as ever devised by ma,n. 

Remember— practical men— men who know the 
virtues of The Sovereign System and reaped the profits 
— say so. The inference is plain. 



Taylor-Forbes Company, 



LIMITED 



Head Office and Works: Gl'ELPH. ONT. 

TORONTO-1088 King St. West. MONTREAL— 122 Craig: St. W<St 

WINNIPEG— The Vulcan Iron Works, Limited 



H A R O W A R E AND ME T A L 



The Summer Vacation 



is about ended. Once more we get down to business with 
renewed effort, much benefitted by the rest we so richly 
deserved. 

Our travellers have again assumed their regular trips. 
More willing than ever to give you their every attention. 

The new lines Of samples they are displaying will be of the 
greatest interest to you. The superior quality of these goods 
will be most gratifying to you. 

The excellent condition of our stock makes us feel proud 
that our labor has been productive of good results ; and that 
we are able to supply our customers' many wants with dis- 
patch to our mutual satisfaction and gain. 

The outlook at present for Fall is one of the brightest 
in the history of the hardware business and we are confident 
that our customers will share well in the profits to be derived 
therefrom. 

RICE LEWIS & SON 



LiniTED 



TORONTO. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



A PRODUCT OF RECOGNIZED SUPERIORITY 

CHICAdO SPRINQ BUTT 




TRIPLB-BND SPRINQ BUTT 





CHICAGO BALL-BEAKINO 
FLOOR HINQE 

XljicagoSSprhjg'Buit (Compatjtj 

CHICAGO NEW YORK 

CATALOQUES ON REQUEST 



Pi^ Iron 



Jarrow Brand 
Clarence " 

Lac ken by " 

Cleveland " 
Gartsherrie " 
Cam b roe " 

Glengarnock " 

ETC. 

If you are in the market, send us particulars 
of your requirements, and we shall be glad to 
quote you favourable prices. 

B.&S.H. THOMPSON & CO, 

LIMITED 

381 and 383 St. Paul Street 
MONTREAL 



Other Tools are very it 
Good Tools, but 

SCREW DRIVERS 



YANKEE TOOLS" 



AR 



The NEWEST, CLEVEREST and QUICKEST SELLING TOOLS 
of the KIND. 




Countersink , 

(or spiral ratchet 

icrew driver. 



SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 
SEND FOR OUR NEW "YANKEE" TOOL BOOK 

NORTH BROS. MFG. GO 



IT \ K D \Y \RF WD M E T A I. 



1 

in 

♦? 

d 

(L 
o 

- 
V 


ip 


■ 



Pil\lr*C M ADE IN CANAD A 

Lumbering 
Tools 



Rend for Catalogue 
•nd Prloe List 



THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 
Zealand, Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all kinds or Lumber Tools 

Pink's Patent Open Socket Peaveys. 
Pink's Patent Open 8ooket Cant Dogs. 
Pink's Patent Clasp Cant Dogs, all Handled 
with Split Rook Maple. 

These are light and durable toele. 

Sold throughout the Dominion 
by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants 



MANUFACTURED BT 



Long- Diatanoe 
Phone No. S7 



THOMAS PINK 
Pembroke, Ont, Canada. 



Pig Iron 



Spot and forward delivery 
Write for Prices 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co 



TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

■j 

■ No Woman Should Do Work a Machine Can Do ■ 

THE BUCKEYE 

Power Washing Machines 

Save Women's Lives 



An Article 

Every 
Dealer Should 

Have 
In His Store 



The Buckeye Motor 

is the only motor constructed 
on scientific principles — the 
same as a steam engine — only 
one valve in its entire con- 
struction, and that is on the 
outside of cylinder, and is 
operated the same as an 
engine valve. 

THE CYLINDER HAS 
NO VALVES INSIDE, NO- 
THING BUT A PLAIN 
PISTON HEAD. 

All parts of the Buckeye 
Motor are made of brass to 
prevent rusting. Our motor 
will operate on any pressure 
from 18 pounds to 250. 




The motor does not extend over edge of the 
tub, being only eleven inches over all, and is 
absolutely POSITIVE in Its action. 

Our tubs are of standard make, large lid, being 
extensions for wringer attachment which will admit 
of the opening of lid clear of any wringer on the 
market. 




THE BUCKEYE POWER WASHER 

Showing Motor on its Base Plate and the Method 
of Transmitting the Power Direct to the 
Dasher Inside the Tub which 
Agitates the Clothes. 

Exclusive Canadian Distributors 



TO-DAY 

DO IT NOW 



Write for PRICES 



WE GUARANTEE 

all parts of the Buckeye 
Power Washer against 
breakage for one year by 
replacing free of charge. 



Now, Mr. Dealer, if you 
want a good selling article — 
one that works itself as well 
as sells itself — investigate the 
merits of the Buckeye Power 
Washer. Every housewife 
who has running water in her 
home is a prospective pur- 
chaser, and it requires but 
for her to see the machine in 
operation and have its merits 
explained to her to make her 
enthusiastic about owning one. 



LEWIS BROS., LIMITED 

Shelf and Heavy Hardware 

Offices and Ware room* i 14 to 28 Bleary Street 



And at 



Ottawa 



MONTREAL 
Toronto Winnipeg 



Calgary 



Vancouver 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



►♦♦♦♦> + »+♦♦>♦♦•»♦ 



Consumers Cordage Co., 

Manufacture every variety of 

BINDER TWINE 



LIMITED 



CORDAQK 



PACKINU 



LATHYARN 



SMALL TWINES 



From Manilla, Sisal, Italian, Russian, Jutb 

Tallow Laid Transmission Rope, 3 or -4 Strand 

Oil Well Drilling Cables, Lariat Hope, 3 or 4 Strand, 

Halyards, Deep Sea Line, Snap Halters, Snap Plow Lines, 

Clothes Lines, Hide Cord, Pulp and Paper Cord, 

Tarred Rope, Marline, Houseline 

Wrapping, Rolling, Seaming, Sewing* and Grape Twines 

Careful Execution SPECIAL ORDERS Prompt Shipment 

Mills: nONTREAL, QUE., and HALIFAX, N.S. 



BRANCHES: 



F.H.ANDREWS & 80N, Quebec. CONSUMERS CORDAQ.E CO., Limited, 8t. John, N.B. MacQOWAN & CO., Vancouver 

TEE8 & PERSSE, Limited, Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton. QEO WOOD, London,. England. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg, Binder Twine Distributors for Northwest. 




Davidsons 
"Empire" Stove Pipe 

Improved Patent 

Neatly packed in crates of 25. 
Secures lowest possible freight rate. 

Deep Swage Prevents Telescoping. 
Coated to Prevent Rust. 

Sold as low as ordinary Stove Pipes. 



SIMPLE and EASY to put together. 
No Profane Language Necessary. 
The only tools required are a pair of hands. 
Pipes being cut out with dies ensure abso- 
lute fit and conformity. 




Wash Tubs— Galvanized 

With Wringer Attachment 



Miners' Camp Kettles 

Strong and substantially made in 
extra heavy tin. 

Nineteen sizes, from 'i, quart to 29 quarts. 




Nos 1 J 3 

Top measurement, inches .. . 21V 3 22% 25 

Bottom " " .... I7y 8 18V4 20 

Height " "... 9y 2 10V4 11 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MFC. CO., Ltd., M w^t 



Montreal a d 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S HOWLAND, SONS &. CO. 



Only 
Wholesale 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 

138-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO. 



LIMITED 



Wholesale 
Only 




Lightning Apple Rarer 



leu Tongs 

Csst S(eel. 12, 16. 24 In. 



Barrel Hatchets 



Our Prices are Right 



H. 8. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 

Opposite Union Station 

GRAHAM WIRE NAILS ARE THE BE8T 

Are you receiving our monthly illustrated circular? IF NOT WRITE FOR IT. 



LIMITED 



We 8hip Promptly 



II A R 1)\V A k ! \ \ D M ET AL 



LOWMOOR IRON IS THE IRON 

TO SELL for use in all worK where 
strength, ductility, ease in worKing' 
and ability to withstand repeated 
shocKs are required. 

We have sold it for thirty years and it has 
always been found reliable. 

It is largely used by the leading Canadian 
railway, car and locomotive builders and machine 
shops. 

Recommend LOWMOOR IRON wherever 
reliable iron is needed, and keep it in stock. 

We have it in rounds, squares, flats. 

Also LOWMOOR IRON boiler rivets 
and plates. 



F.oW. 



Hardware 
Montreal 

THINGHAM <£ WORKMAN, Limited 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



A New Automatic Pistol 



the "Webley"— 
from the shops of Scott and 
Webley, Limited, makers of 
the small arms used in the 
British Army. 

The "Webley" pistol combines all the advant- 
ages found in the various automatic pistols at 
present on the market. In addition, however, its 
construction is simple, it has greater strength, and 
is lighter and less bulky. 

An efficient safety is provided, permitting the 
pistol to be carried at full cock without danger 
of discharge. This safety is always in engagement. 
Before firing it is necessary to raise the safety lever 
on the side of the pistol until the word safe is 
covered. 

The advantages of automatic pistols are now 
generally recognized. They are easier to manipu- 
late, can be fired more rapidly, and with greater 
precision and hitting-force than ordinary revolvers. 

This arm uses Kynoch smokeless cartridges 
adapted to 7.65 M.M. Browning and .32 calibre 
automatic pistols. Order them as 7.65 M.M. Brown- 
ing or .32 automatic pistol cartridges. 

Because it is British-made and enjoys the 
preference, it is lower ' in price than other pistols 
on the market. 



Ask 
about it. 



for prices. Speak to our travellers 




8 shots ; [weight with maga- 
zine, 20 oz. ; length, 6% in. ; 
depth, 4]4 in. Penetration 
at 20 yards : 7 one-inch pine 
boards. 




and put together again in a few minutes 




without the use of any tools. 

The Cartridge. 




%mdMSwmwki(& 



WINNIPEG, 



MONTREAL 

OTTAWA, QUEBEC, FRASERVILLE 



H A RDWARE AND M E T A L 



Canada Leads the World in the Manufacture of 

HIGH-CLASS SAWS 







■ 



No. 81 



The best and cheapest Hand Saw on the market, quality, temper and finish considered. 
Every saw warranted. Carved applewood handle. Patented, wave finish blade. 




No. 1 Maple Leaf Lance Tooth Cross-Cut Saw, and the No. Eacer are tempered under 
our secret process. 



^(W™ 





Wo. O Narrow Racer Cross-Cut Saw 



If you want saws that will sell and give your customer satisfaction, you will stock 
the Maple Leaf Saws. 



MtmuTaoUj rod 
by 



SHURLY & DIETRICH, 



CALT, Ontario 



HARDWARE AND METAL 








\SSw! ( 



Simonds 
Crescent-Ground Cross-Gut Saws 

For logging camps where work must be fast and economical there is no other saw made that can 
give results equal to the Crescent-Ground Saw. Made of Simonds Steel. It cuts easy, runs fast 
and gives good results. This cross-cut saw is sold by most of the leading jobbers in Canada. 

Simonds Canada Saw Co., Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 



A Shop F"Lill of Triplex Blocks 

Cuts out much of the waiting time of men and machines. The saving effected 
by installing YALE and TOWNE BLOCKS is generally enough to cover 
their cost in six months. In hanging shafting, etc., a TRIPLEX BLOCK often 

saves its cost on one job. 

HOT FORGED DRILLS. SHEFFIELD FILES. SMALL TOOLS. 



THE CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO., Ltd., 



I6K0NI© 



WINNIPEG 



MONTREAL 

VANCOUVER 




Wheelbarrows 



All kinds and sizes. The cut repro- 
duced here is just of one of the many, 
but the kind every contractor should 
use. The substantial, satisfactory, 
steel tray Contractor's Barrow. 

The London Foundry Co. 

LONDON, CAN. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

THREE BUSINESS BOOMERS 

Maxwell Lawn Mower Two Household Favorites 




Durable, 
Clean-cutting, 
and 

Beautifully 
W Finished. 




They are 
both 
"Self- 
Sellers." 
Keep 
them in 
stock. 



David Maxwell & Sons, St. Mary's, Out. 




SIMPLE 




STYLE F. 



TI1E 



LEADER 



A Name Familiar to Butter Maker* in Connection with the 

Highest Grade Churns 



IT6 STRONG POINTS: 

Stiff Steel Frame, with malleable iron fittings, Combination Bow 
Lever and Pedal Drive. Bicycle Ball Bearings. Bolted Trun- 
nions. Cream Breakers. Barrel easily drained and conveniently 
detatchable for cleaning. 
Dealers : When you handle this line you handle QUALITY. 

The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., Limited 



W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal 

EASTERN AGENTS 



HAMILTON 

ONTARIO 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK ^ '""■'■•»•••" "«" •■•'■■ 



[NOES- 




WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO.. Limited, 



■ LONDON, ONT. 



- [E$T'$CLIPPER5| | 

TwSTHiad^fclwstrta Pewer 

. ARE THE BEST. 

High wt Quality Oroomli^ and 
Sheep-Shearing Machine,. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

aXKI> FOB OITAIOSDI TO 
I— tH* SfcMTW ■«* ■ «•* iHkU, ■ .H,C»» 

Waibusch & Hilger, Limited special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 




V 



The Peterborough Lock Manufacturing Company, Limited 




Qyllnd.r Night Latch, No. lOa. 




Peterborough, Ont. 



Manufacturer* of all klna~* 



Rim and Mortise Locks, 
Inside, Front Door, and 
Store Door Sets, also full 
line High-class Builders' 
Hardware. 

Sold by all Loading Jobboro 
In tho Dominion. 



IO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




THE POSTED 
DEALER KNOWS 



that H & R gives greatest revolver value for the 
money. The new 



H&R 



DOUBLE ACTION 
REVOLVER MODEL 1906 



is no exception to the rule. It is surprisingly good for the price. Surprisingly 
cheap for so good a revolver. Is a thoroughly well made, durable and serviceable 
arm. Light in weight, only ten ounces, and small in size, it is particularly 
adapted for those who desire a safe and efficient revolver at a moderate price. 



c» mj, . • 22 Call 

Specifications Finest 



Nickel Finish. Also made with 4', in. and 6 in. barrel. 



The Celebrated H & R Hammerless is always a good seller. 
Catalog of Revolvers and Single Barrel Shot Guns. 



Write for 



Model 
1906 




H&E 

Greatest 

Revolver 

Value for 

the 

Money 



HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 



314 Park Ave., 



Worcester, Mass. 



FOR BEST 




QUALITY 



IN 



ENAMELLED and GALVANIZED 



WARE 

Buy goods 
manufactured by 

Ontario Steel Ware, Limited 




115-121 Brock Ave*, and 79-91 



renca St. 



TORONTO. ONT 



ii 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ATKINS 



SILVER 
STEEL 



SAWS 




are profitable Saws. 
Full of Quality, you 
can safely recom- 
mend them to your 
trade. Every Atkins 
Saw you sell, sells 
others — There's 
money in them for 
YOU. Shall we 
call? 



£. C. A TKINS & CO., Inc. 

The Silver Steel Saw People, 

Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Canadian Branch— No. 77 Adelaide St., E„ Toronto 



The Long and the Short of It 



IT" MEANS 




THE "LONG" 

is the time it wears. It stands the test of heat 
and frost, wind and rain, and gives your cus- 
tomers manv years of solid satisfaction. 

THE "SHORT" 

part is the time needed to put it on. A great 
deal of time- — which means a great deal of 
money — is saved to the man who uses 

SHIELD BRAND 
READY ROOFING 



LOCKERBY ®> McCOMB 

<33 SHANNON STREET 

MONTREAL 



Scrap I ron for Re-working 

Better bars for reworking are obtained from selected scrap than ton 
pig iron — have more life and strength. 

London Bars are made from selected scrap and come in Flats, Rounds, 
Squares, Ovals, Half-Ovals, Half-Rounds and Bands. 

Large stock always on hand, insuring prompt shipment n 

London Rolling Mills_^^ 

London, Canada. (^ \ 








When in the 

market for 

GANG CHEESE 

PRESSES and 

up- to - date 

CURD CUTTERS 

i u s t sit 

down and 

write to JAMES & REIO, Perth, Ont. For 

FARMERS FEED COOKERS write JAMES BROS 

FOUNDRY CO., Perth, Ont. 



The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO 

— Manufacturers of the celebrated — 

"Saugeon Brand" 

OF PORTLAND CEMENT 

Prices on application. Prompt shipment 




NEWMAN'S PATENT 

INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualltiet rt<>»irable in a DoorCloser. 
They work pilently and effectually and nevpr cct 
ont of order. In use in inat'y oi the publio buildings 
throughout Great Britain and the OoloDies. 
MADE SOLELY BY 
W. NEWMAN & 80N8. Birmingham. 



.Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their adver- 
tisement in this paper. 



12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



A RECORD BREAKING SELLER 



22 CALIBRE 
16 SHOT 



■ 




HOPKINS & ALLEN'S 



MILITARY BOLT ACTION REPEATING RIFLE 



7£ There has long been a demand for a good rifle at this price— and the 

HOPKINS & ALLEN Junior Repeater fills the bill. This rifle has been and 

LIST * s oe i n g extensively advertised, and a heavy sale for it is created. 

SPECIFICATIONS :— 22-inch barrel, take-down, 22 calibre. Magazine handles 22 short, 22 long and 22 
long rifle cartridges without change of carrier. Shoots 16-22 short or 12-22 long or long rifle cartridges. 
Action, Militaty Bolt Pattern with positive safety device. Length over all, 40 inches, weight S l / 2 pounds. 



$ 



10 



FOR SALE BY ALL FIRE- 
ARMS JOBBERS. 




PLENTY OF GOOD SUPPLE- 
MENTARY ADVERTISING 
MATTER— FREE. 





WRITE FOR CATALOGS 



THE HOPKINS & ALLEN ARMS CO. 




LONDON OFFICE 



6 Olty Road, Finsbury Square, London Dept, 67, NORWICH, CONN., U.S.A. 



Shows Bolt Drawn Back— Position for Ejecting 
Shells. 



Typewriter Wanted 

If you want to buy or sell 
a second hand typewriting 
machine, insert a "want ad." 
in Hardware and Metal. 

The "want ad." will only 
cost you twenty-five or fifty 
cents and it will probably be 
the means of saving you five 
or ten dollars. 

Rates 2c. per word first insertion 
Ic. per word subsequent insertions 

WRITE OUR NEAREST OFFICE 

HARDWARE and METAL 

Montreal - Toronto - Winnipeg 



Tested and Proved the Best ! 

Good axe blades should only be 
affixed to the very best 

AXE HANDLES 

That's why you should make a 
customer-pleasing specialty of 

Empire, Imperial and Champion 

Axe Handles. They are the 
best. So are our 

Hammer, Sledge and Pick Handles 



Our free lists and discounts may be had for the asking. 



J. H, Still Manufacturing Company, 



ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO 



LMtii 



13 



HXKDWARE AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED 
1847 



FACTORIES 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. 



SHEFFIELD CUTLERY AND SILVERWARE 



Round's goods have stood the test for over sixty years and for good "All Round" 
values you will find they can't be beaten. We carry the largest stock of silverware and 
cutlery to be found in Canada — ready for immediate delivery. 



aPfcfcs 




■HHMilllMilM 

4!:37— E.P.N. S. Entree. 10-in., 11-in. and 12-in. sizes 



9365— E.P.N. S. Revolving Breakfast Dish; 10-in. and 11-in. sizes 





29368' i— 12 pair Desserts. Five ply oak case. 

(Guaranteed not to warp) 



R 619 -Cabinet 29 pieces. Five ply oak case. 

(Guaranteed not to Warp) 



JOHN ROUND and SON, Ltd. 

MONTREAL 



14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Dunn Hollow Concrete Block Machine 



Many dealers are in- 
creasing their trade in 
Cement by pushing sales 
of the^Dunn Machine. 

Some are also making 
a good profit by renting 
machines to parties 
building. Machine is 
compact, portable, sim- 
ply operated and mod- 
erate in price. 




WRITE US FOR CATALOGUE H. 



The James Stewart Mfg. Co., Limited, Woodstock, Ont. 



OalfSuregripShinglej. 

are simply wonders to sell, to lay and to make friends. Once used 
and you would never use any other — your customers wouldn't let you. 

"Sure-Grips" make a really handsome roof, as well as the most 
weatherproof. Try them — that's all we ask. 

"Galt" Corrugated Sheets are best English galvanized stock, pressed 
straight and true. Our prices are right, and we can ship promptly. 

Consult us before purchasing Ceilings, Sidings, Roofings, Cornices, 
Skylights, Ventilators, Finials, Fire-proof Windows, Expanded 
Metal Lath, etc. 

The "Galt Kind" is the line to push ; we protect 
and assist our customers. 

THE GALT ART METAL CO., Limited 

GALT, - ONT. 




Past Due Accounts. 

We can assist you to convert 
these into Working Capital. 

Intelligent and up-to-date at- 
tention given to all claims en- 
trusted to us. 

Let us assist you. 

The Beardwood Agency 

Claims Collections and Commercial 
Reports 

313 New York Life BIdg., MONTREAL 



MITCHELL'S SELF-TESTING SAFETY CODE 

REVISED EDITION 

A New and Scientific System for the Transmission of 
Messages ' ,v ' e ' 1 'graph or Cable, so arranged that one word 
may convey several meanings, such as Article. Quality, Price 
Quantity, Terms, etc. 

- Jiy other codes three and four words are required to 
express what this system will convey in one word, thus 
costing three and four times as much as the same message 
if sent by this system. 

EXAMPLES 

Code Words 
LUDSELPIKI, MEBDIKOLAF WOOUMZEXG] Shipby 

Cunard Steamer from your port 28th June, 150 pieces 

Bevelled Plate Glass, 1J" bevel, 1SJ x 24". 
WULYRSAUM S eel sheets2?g, 24 xiri", 10,000 packages. 
WUrTMIiAliHK Wire Nails 5d. Buy 500 kegs. 
WIWIU.K AKDi: Uosin, 'T quality, quote cost and freight 

shipment. 1st half of next month, 200 barrels 
XASYSJABBA-Delivery Waggon Platform SpringB 2 to 

3,000 lbs , increase our order to ten. 
Try these with your codes. An 8-page prospectui with full 
particulars sent free on request 

The Mitchell Self -Testing Safety Code Co. 



8 COLBORNF ST. 



TORONTO, CANADA 



Jardine Hand Drills 

New Designs 

Get samples of these machines ior 
your show room. They will interest 
your customers and prove a good in- 
vestment. 

It pays to sell the best Tools. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 



HESPELER 



ONTARIO 



...FULL STOCK... 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERP1PE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

THE GANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO, »1" 

■T. JOHNS. «UE. 



15 



TI A R D\V A R F. A ND MET \ I. 



"Standard' Fixtures Give Permanent Satisfaction 




"Siandard" Piste P507 

-^ XtlttQtif Q Porcelain Enameled "Lenox" Design Lavatory with Slab, Apron, 

Bowl and Overflow all in one piece, Porcelain Enameled 

Brackets, Nickel-plated Waste Plug, Rubber Stopper, Chain Stay and Chain, Low 

Pattern Compression Faucets with China Indexes, Supply Pipes, and "P" Trap with 

Waste and Vent to Wall. 



When an architect's client finds that 
"Stotidwd" Porcelain Enameled Fixtures 
have been specified for his property 
he is pleased, because he has been taught 
by actual experiences to regard *jStattdo#d* 
Fixtures as the most beautiful, the most 
sanitary and the most satisfactory 
equipment that he can secure. The 
Architect, on the other hand, knows that 
his customer has the right impression 
of "5taKf«d" fixtures and that the test 
of use will increase his satisfaction. 

Standard ^attitans lt)fe. Co. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 



Growth of Canada's Export 

Trade. 

Value of Annual Exports from Canada : 

1886— $85,251,314.00 1896 -$118,011,508.00 1906 - $256,586,630.00 

What is YOUR share of this ever-increasing business ? 

THE BEST WAY to reap the profits of foreign trade is through the unique foreign trade service of the 

AMERICAN EXPORTER. 

HALF A THOUSAND Manufacturers use this method of reaching the buyers abroad. Among them : 



Dominion Cartridge Co., Limited - - Montreal 

Waterous Engine Works Co. - - Brantford 

Canada Horse Nail Co. - Montreal 

Sylvester Bros. Mfg. Co. ... Lindsay 



Qoold, Shapley & Muir Co. - 
Brantford Carriage Co. 
Metallic Roofing Co. 
Page Wire Fence Co., Limited 



Brantford 
Brantford 
Toronto 
Walkerville 



ANNUAL HARDWARE NUMBER PUBLISHED AUGUST 1st ^ 

AMERICAN EXPORTER 

Established 1877 Conducted by Export Specialists 

135 William Street, New York City, U.S.A. 

16 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




A QUESTION OF MERIT 



Registers, like all other articles, 
appeal to people on their lasting 

merit— their superiority to the next best on the market. The reason 

why most shrewd dealers recommend the 

JONES' SIDE-WALL REGISTERS 

is apparent to the practical man at a glance. They reduce the initial 
cost of a heating system by reducing piping 50 per cent.— save money 
for your customer, and give thorough and lasting satisfaction. 

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS 

The Jones Register Co. 



732 King St. West 



Toronto, Canada 



Wrought Steel Registers 



Standard Sizes, All Finishes 
Perfect Operating Device 
Unusually Large Air Space 
For Sale by Leading Jobbers 



HART (EL COOLEY CO. 

New Britain, Conn., U.S.A. 




H. &. C. No. 100. 



FERROSTEEL REGISTERS 



The only house in the world manufacturing 



CAST IRON FLOOR 

SEMI STEEL FLOOR 

WROUGHT STEEL FLOOR 

CAST IRON SPECIAL SIDE WALL 

WROUGHT STEEL SPECIAL SIDE WALL 

FLAT OR CONVEX EXTRA SHALLOW SIDE WALLS 

DEFLECTORS, PANCAKES, WAFERS 



In all Designs and Finishes. 

Mechanism Perfect. 

Capacity Greatest. 

Finish Unsurpassed. 

No reputable line can undersell us. 



MM 



I****** 



lissii 




MOORISH DESIGN 



FERROSTEEL COMPANY, 



CLEVELAND, OHIO 



94 **• 




Brantford Roofin g 

We beg to announce to the Trade throughout 

Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia 

that our representative, MR. J. S. McGUIRL will call upon 
you shortly in the interest of 

Brantford Roofing Co., Brantford, Canada. 



17 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED 1795 



JOHN SHAW & SONS 

WOLVERHAMPTON, Limited 




WOLVERHAMPTON 



Coil Chain 

Canada Plates 
Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Galvanized Sheets 
Bar Iron 

Lowest Prices for Import. 

J. H. ROPER 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE 

82 St. Francois Xavier Street, - MONTREAL 



fA ■ 







A Profit-making Fence 



which is also customer-pleasing 
is a boon to the hardwareman. 
That combination is found in the 

"Dillon" Hinge-Stay 
Field Fence 

It is ECONOMICAL, DURABLE and SALEABLE 

Write for descriptive literature. 
It costs you nothing. 

THE OWEN SOUND WIRE FENCE CO., Lintel 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

Cnlrl hit | Messrs - Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal 
OOIQ DY | Messrs. Christie Bros. Co., Limited, Winnipeg 
(The Abercrombie Hardware Co., Vancouver 




BEAVER POST-HOLE DIGGER 

will please your customer. A pleased customer is an 
asset to any business. No wood to rot, check or break. 

Special Discounts to Trade 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 

LIMITED ■ 



HEAD OFFICE and WORKS, TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices : Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, 

Vancouver, Roseland 



Winnipeg 



"KANDA" RBgi LIQUID METAL POLISH 

BRITISH MANUFACTURE. 

Absolutely non-inflammable. Has no bad smell. 

Leaves no Verdigris. Contains no acid or grit. . 

Leaves no greasy smear. KANDA polishes all metal. 

ii-**!'**-'-'* ^ N - /N - / '» LONDON. ENGLAND 

SOLE AGENTS for Ontario: 

THE KENNEDY HARDWARE CO., Ltd. 

TORONTO 




CONTRACTS 



mean dollars for the pockets of 
contractors. The weekly re- 
ports Id the 

CANADIAN 

CONTRACT 

RECORD 

tell where contracts may be had. 

$2 per year buys them. Address 

The Contract Record 

TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG and VANCOUVER. 



Expert Bookkeeping 

Investigation and auditing of all classes 
of accounts undertaken. Trading, profit 
and loss accounts and balance sheets 
prepared. Sets of books opened and 
office systems devised in an up-to-date 
manner. Collection of accounts a 
specialty. 

Davenport, Pickup & Co. 

622 Mcfnijre Block and 422 Ashdown Block 

WINNIPEG MAN. 
AND AT BRANDON, MAN. 

Square your Accounts 



II \ ROW A R E A X I) M I. I'M. 




You May Be a Good Salesman 

But, is everything in your favor? Are you selling 
the new Imperial Oxford ? A continuous stream of 
repeat orders tells the story to us. 



Removable Nickel 
Removable Fire Linings 
An Oval Firebox 
The " Divided Draft" 



All contained by 
the best looking 
stove in the mar- 
ket. 



It gives a good salesman a chance to spread 
himself. 

Drop us a card, or, better still, tell us the size 
range you want on your floor. If you get this 
agency you're lucky. 



TKe Gurney Foundry Company, Limited 



Toronto 



Winnipeg 



Vancouver 



Hamilton and London 



THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO.. LIMITED. MONTREAL. Que 
THE GURNEY STANDARD METAL CO.. LIMITED. CALGARY. Altt 



"SUNSHINE" ELRNACE 

The most successful hot air furnace in Canada. 

Built to burn all kinds of fuel successfully. 

Large double feed doors admit rough chunks of 
wood and make it an easy furnace to feed with coal. 




~3|!£?Jy ore «7*~ 




All parts exposed to fire and wear are made extra 
heavy. 

Never gives any trouble after being properly 
installed. 

Has more good selling arguments than any other 
furnace made. 

Extensively advertised from Halifax to Vancouver. 

If you are dissatisfied with your present line write 
for catalog and complete information on the " Sunshine." 



THE McCLARY MEG. CO 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, ST. JOHN, N.B., HAMILTON, CALOARY 



19 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



To 



EVERY MAN 

who uses 

Fire Bricks 

We handle the best makes of Scotch 
Fire Bricks, and our prices are right, 
but there are occasions when you 
must have more refractory materials, 
and then please remember that we 
are the Canadian representatives of 
the 

"HARBISON WALKER REFRACTORIES" 
COMPANY 

and this should indicate that we are 
the Fire Brick House of Canada. 

Others ol our exclusive specialties 
are 

Lafarge 

Non-Staining Cement 

Iron Clad 

Portland Cement 

United Paving 
Be wo in r,i he Bricks 
Enamelled Bricks 

All Colors 

Drain Pipes 
Plaster, etc. 



Francis Hyde&Co, 

KING, QUEEN and WELLINGTON STS. 
MONTREAL 



Smooth finish, perfect threads and first-class 
material, are the reasons why 

"Diamond" brand Fittings 

are in such constant demand. 
WHOLESALE ONLY 

OSHAWA STEAM & GAS FITTING CO., 

OSHAWA, CANADA 




LIMITED 



Don't Stop 




to ask your neighbor, lift 

the load yourself with 

The Burr Self-Locking 

Tackle Block. Saves the labor of two or three 

600 to 5,000 pounds capacity. 



Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Munro Wire Woiks, Winnipeg 
Vokes Hardware Co., Toronto 
F. Hamilton & Co., Hamilton 
The Bnrr Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio 




Every Pound Guaranteed 



It's not good business to stock any Furnace or Stove 
Cement you are not sure about. Why not be absolutely 
certain by stocking 



Sterne's Asbestos Stove 
Furnace Cement 



and 



easily the best by any ten ever placed on the markets 
of the Dominion. There's no waste with Sterne's Furnace 
and Stove Cement. It must give satisfaction. Ask for 
proofs of its superiority. 

G. F. STERNE & SONS, 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 



Queen City Water White Oil 

GIVES PERFECT LIGHT 

The most economical high-grade oil ever sold in Canada. 

FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS 



Ml 




SIMONDS HAND SAWS 

are good sellers. Dealers should send for 1907 Catalogue and discounts. 

SIMONDS MANUFACTURING CO. 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

Branches Throughout The United States 



SIMONDS No. S 

This Saw is of the general style 
and shape which carpenters have 
been accustomed to using for years 
past. Has a carved apple handle 
with highly polished sides and edges, 
making a very pretty Saw. Holds its 
cutting edge and saws true. Its high 
quality and even temper are due to 
the fact that it is Made of 8lmonds 
8teel. Covered by the broadest 
Simonds warranty. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





WE DESIGN AND MANUFACTURE 
An Extensive Line of 

ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

Gas and Combination Fixtures 



We make these 
goods in com- 
bination with 
Art Glass, 
Crystals and 
Hammered 
Brass. 



The Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Limited 



EUREKA HANGERS 

The best on the market. Particular men say so— so 

we merely repeat their 
statements. It does hold 
the collar correctly, and 
a well-made coat cannot 
wrinkle on this hanger. 
The only hanger which 

holds the concave shoulder properly in place. 

The Eureka Trousers Hanger is tha simplest and best. 
No rough edges to mar 




the finest fabric. The 
adjustable hook can be 
turned down to occupy 
the least possible space. 



Ornamental, Economical and Useful. Hence the 

best possible sellers. Let's mail you 

interesting facts. 



Forsyth Manufacturing Co 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

W. F. Canavan, 13 Si. John Street, Montreal, Representative 




X 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Architects, Builders and Plumbers 
freely endorse 

Standard Ideal Porcelain 

Enameled Ware 

Dealers handling Standard 
Ideal Ware are assured of 
larger sales, better satisfac- 
tion and greater profits. 
' » '• Manufactured in Canada, 

this ware is the equal ot any 
foreign product ol a like 
nature. 

Standard Ideal Ware has 
the strength of iron, together 
with a beautiful, smooth, 
china - like surface, which 
with it's one-piece con- 
struction ensures its freedom 
from dust, dirt and germs. 

We manufacture Bath 
Tubs, Sitz Baths, Shower 
Baths, Sinks, Lavatories, 
Urinal Ranges, Slop Hop- 
pers, Laundry Tubs, Closet 
Ranges, Steamship Supplies, 
Railway Car Supplies, Hos- 
pital Appliances, Etc. 

The Standard Ideal Co., Limited 

Head Off ioes and Factories, - PORT HOPE, Ont. 

Sales Office* and Sample Rooms, 60 Colborne Street, TORONTO 
128 West Sralg- Street, MONTREAL, and 24 Telfer Blook, WINNIPEC 




CREENING'S 




PATENT 

COW 
TIES 



These cow ties 
have stood the test 
for years. 

Undoubtedly the 
best and strongest 
on the market. 



It will pay to 
handle only the 
best. 

A complete line 
of all sizes ready 
for shipment. 



For Sale 
By All Jobbers 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., 



LIMITED 




GENUINE 




QUALITY 



•SALUTE" 
Flushing Oiler 




SIGHT FEED STEAM LUBRICATORS 
STANDARD STEAM WHISTLES 
PLAIN ENGINE LUBRICATORS 

WATER GAGES 

GAGE COCKS 
OIL CUPS and GREASE CUPS 

PRIMING CUPS 

AIR COCKS, CYLINDER COCKS 

RADIATOR AIR VALVES STEAM GAGES 

XL-96 EJECTORS™ SYPHONS"' 




PLAIN ENGINE 

LUBRICATOR 

With Drain and Tube 



"8AM8ON" 
Screw Compression Grease Cup 




"SILEX" 
Self-Feeding Grease Cup 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURING CO. 

MONTREAL TORONTO """" 

Manufacturers of 
PLAIN WIRE All Sizes and for all purposes, 

GALVANIZED WIRE X>neTu%%e T s e .' e9raph and Te ' e ' 

Copper and Brass Wire 

WIRE NAILS 
WOOD SCREWS 

BrightJNire Goods 
Staples 
Steel and Brass [Jack Chain 
Strand Guy Wire, Steel Wire Barrell Hoops 



Spring Cotters, 



% 



its the GLASS CONE 




that 
makes 
this new 
burner a 
great 
success 



It gives full benefit of flame 

down to the very 

wick top. 

FOR SALE BY ALL PROMINENT DEALERS. 
Manufactured by the 

ONTARIO LANTERN AND LAMP CO. 
HAMILTON, OUT. llMITBD 



W Mi*, it s 6 « 



When you get our goods you know you 

get THE BEST. 

We manufacture 
Water Filters 
Water Coolers 
Chafing Dishes 
Table Kettles and 

Stands 
Coffee Extractors 
Wine Coolers 
Nursery Chests 
Baking Dishes 
Crumb Trays and 

Scrapers 
Tea and Bar Urns 
Bathroom Fixtures 
Coal Vases and 

Hods 
Candlesticks 
Cuspidors 
Match Safes, Etc. 

All High Grade and exceedingly presentable. 

REPRESENTED BY 

H. F. MclNTOSH & CO. 




34 Yonge Street 



Write for 

Catalogue 



TORONTO, ONT. 



23 



II \ K D\\ A K E AND METAL 



4 ^A^AA^^^#*^*^##^^^M*^^^^U^MA^#*^»^^^**^^^^f 



H. BOKER &. CO.'S CUTLERY 




Recommend Boker's Pocket Knives, Scissors and Razors, if you want 
to work up a good Cutlery trade, and at the same time insure for yourself 
a good profit. You can double your cost price on every sale and still give good value 
and satisfaction to your patrons. 

FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES 



! TtTTtf y,yy T ^^ ttf * tT - tf *# TT „# t ^ f t * TY , ,„ Tf trvTtT „ tTyYvrTrvvrt7YrTfTf , { 



Telegraphic Address : 
"MADDERETTE, LONDON " 

W. J. COWAN 

AND 

SONS 

Fine Colour Manufacturers 

Works : 
Hague St., Bethnal Creen, London, E. 

SPECIALTIES : 

Blues, all shades and qualities 
Chromes, " " 

Creens, " " 

Imitation Vermilion and Carmine 
Lakes 

Also all colours made from 

Aniline, Cochineal, Madder, Wood Extracts, 
Llthol, Paranitranlllne, Etc. 

REPRESENTATIVE 

WM. O. GREENWAY 

13 ST. JOHN ST., - MONTREAL 




Will Hold up A Shelf 

That's what a shelf brackets for. 
For this purpose there can be 
Nothing Better, Nothing 
Cheaper thao the BRADLEY STEEI 
BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong and 
Light. The saviug on freight is a good profll 
aside from the lower price at which the goodr 
are sold. Order direct or through your jobbers 

ATLAS MFC. CO., Hew Haven. 




it 



Quality Unsurpassed 



J 9 




IGH-GRADE MATERIAL, 
Skilled \A/orl<nr»©ri, 

Up-to-date Equipment, 

Careful Supervisioi 

Account for the success of 

Belleville J\. Brand 

HORSE SHOES 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Toronto and Belleville Rolling Mills 





^aii^m^Mfmafm&iWM^ 



HOW TO BUIIiD A GOOD FENCE 



Everyone intending fence building should send for our folder on Erecting 
Fences. It's full of valuable Information on feme building, tells how to erect 
woven wire fencing quickly and eubntantiallv, describes the manufacture of 
fence wire and has an article quoted from bulletin of V. S. Dept. of Agriculture 
on concrete post making, showing how these durable posts can be economically 
made at home. Don't fail to write for acopy. It's free. 

THE RANWKM. HOXJE WIRE I'MCE CO., Ltd. , t 

Dept. J Hamilton, Ontario. Winnipeg! Manitoba. 



THE fENCr; 

1 WITH TBt V 



24 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Alumino" and "Electric 



»» 



OIL HEATERS 

You know the burner is the very soul of the oil heater. If the burner 
is not perfect the heater is utterly unreliable, unsatisfactory. 

"Alumino" and "Electric" Oil Heaters are equipped with our Grand 
Safety Burner with its solid flame spreader ; its liberal air passages, which 
give thorough circulation and therefore perfect combustion. See beiow. 

Noodor. No smoke. No danger. No trouble. And a furnace for heat. 

The only oil heaters which radiate heat like a base burner, from the 
sides and bottom as well as the top— heat the whole room. 

Sell on sight and stay sold. Never come back for repairs nor is it 
ever necessary to send a man out to rewick and explain and operate. 

No other oil heater possesses all these merits, sells so quickly, or 
is so profitable to the dealer. 



Sectional view showing con 
struction grand"S*FETY BURNER' 



A — Flame Spreader ; B — Air space outside of Wick ; 
C— Air space inside of Wick Tube; D— Wick; 
E — Outside Casing to Burner ; F — Air space between 
Fount and Outside Casing ; G — Fount for oil, entirely 
separate from Burner; H— Pipe Feed carrying oil 
from Fount to Burner. 




Get your order in with- 
out delay; somebody will 
have to wait, if we can 
judge from the demand. 




Lewis Bros., Ltd. 



Montreal 
Winnipeg 



Toronto 
Vancouver 



Ottawa 

Calgary 




IS BURMAN 

"PusH-Spring" 
Toilet 




Emerson & Fisher, Ltd. 

ST. JOHN, N.B. 



THE NEW HAIR CLIPPER 

Elegance with True Mechanical Design. 
Ease of Action with Accurate Fitting. 

Interchangeable Parts. Precise Machining. 
Detachable Plates. 



MADE FN FOUR SfZES 



No. to cut 1-16 inch 
No. 1 to cut J s inch 
No. 2 to cut Vi inch 
No. 3 to cut 5-1 6 inch 

FROM ALL J0BBER8. A stock of machines and parts is held in Canada. 

BURMAN & SONS, Ltd., Lee Bank Works, BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND 



.'-■.CUJflEHUWaH 



When ordering your stock of Cutlery, specify the 

AM 

brand of The R. Berg Cutlery Co. There is quite a 
demand for these goods, as they have proved to be 
of the very best quality and finish which will satisfy 
even the most particular customers. 

Our "Diamond Edge" Scissors are to-day a 
favorite in the market, and your stock is not com- 
plete without them. It is just the kind your customers like, and as to quality, well, we guarantee it to be second to none. 
Ask your jobber for details and prices, or write to 

F. W. LAM PLOUGH & CO., * Oe Bresoles Street, MONTREAL 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



PROFIT and REPUTATION 
4SSI RE SUCCESS 

Are your profits reasonable and secure? Unless you are absolutely certain on both 
points you are playing a losing game. You can secure both reputation and profit 
permanently by stocking the proper kind of 

WINDOW GLASS 

We do not pretend to manufacture imperishable window glass, but it is an easily 
proven fact that we manufacture the next best thing. 

Have you our catalogue ? You ought to have it because it contains suggestions 
for Faif Lights, Door Lights, Hall Windows, Side Lights, Etc., made in Copper or German Brass. 

All orders shipped landed in proper condition because they are properly packed. 
LETS MAIL YOU SOME INTERESTING FACTS. 

The Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited 

LONDON TORONTO WINNIPEG 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 

Mtnufaoturtn RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 

HIGH-GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES 

MONTREAL. 



A Certain Sense 

of Satisfaction 



1830 1907 



Seymours 
shears 



FOR OVER 
HALF A CENTURY 

FULLY WARRANTED 




Above is a reproduction of Show Card 9 in. x 15 in- in colors which we will send free to dealers in 

exchange for business card. 

HENRY T. SEYMOUR SHEAR COMPANY. WIEBUSCH AND HILGER, LIMITED, Sole Agents, NEW YORK. 



goes with every MERREiL PORTABLE HAND 
MACHINE, PIPE THREADING and CUTTING 
MACHINE. We build them that way. 

For doing all kinds of threading— under all con- 
ditions — labor trouble and faulty material included 
—where speed, durability and ease of control count 
for something, our word to you is to investigate the 
MERRELL. 

Whether it be stationary or portable— hand or 
power driven— 30 DAYS FREE TRIAL must 
prove conclusively that your choice should be the 
MERRELL. 

This Portable Hand Machine has encased gears, 
MERRELL standard quick opening and closing die- 
head, and the latest improved Cutting-off Knife. 

Let us tell you more about this machine — The 
Chasers, Vise and the large range of work covered. 

Catalogue for the asking. 
Quick shipments. 

m CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO. 

Sole Agents tot Canada Limited 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, VAN00UVER 



26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



•' 



PRESSED ZINC ORNAMENTS 




# 

i.i 



® 



We are offering the trade spendid values in all kinds of architectural 
pressed zinc ornaments, including: 

CABLE ORNAMENTS, CAPITALS, 
BRACKETS, GARLANDS, ETC. 

We can make up special ornaments to order, and invite your cor- 
respondence on the subject, m 



" WE WORK WITH THE TRADE ' 



The Metal Shingle and Siding Co., Limited | 

Montreal Preston, Ont. Toronto o 

ST. JOHN, N.B. SALES AGENTS: WINNIPEG g 

Emerson & Flshir, Limited QUEBEC Clare & Brockest (•) 

CALGARY J. A. Bernard VANCOUVER # 

Ellis & Grogan McLennan, McFeely & Co. ® 

•©•••••••••••••••••••••••••J. ••»«•* 



». 




FOR PLATE 



Will Call on You 

Our Canadian representative is 
calling on the trade from Montreal 
to Vancouver. His trip will oc- 
cupy about three months. He 
will be pleased to show you our 
complete line of Silverware, 
Cutlery, Flasks, etc. 
Kindly address the Montreal 
office, making an appointment. 

Uf>e House of Hutton 

Established in England in 1600 



Sole Canadian Agent 
W.J.GRANT, Lindsay Bldg., MONTREAL 



.^ \ 




FOR CUTLERY 



Canadian National 

EXHIBITION 

1907-T0R0NT0, ONT.-1907 

Saturday, Monday, 

Aug. 24th Sept. 9th 



$400,000 In New Buildings $400,000 
In Premiums $45,000 In Premiums 
$40,000 For Attractions $40,000 



Historical Art Loan 
in New Art Gallery 



Extra Fine Exhibit of 
Pure Bred Live Stock 



Five Acres of Industrial Exhibits 

Grand Musical Festival 

Brilliant Military Speotacle 

Highest Class Special Features 

Battle of Badajos (Nightly) 

Largest Fire-Proof Grand Stand In America 



Six Tickets 

for 
One Dollar 



Reduced Rates 

on all 
Lines of Travel 



Creat Dog 

and 
Cat 8hows 



The First Week is the Best Week for Comfort 



The Rowland Pump Oiler 



FOR SALE BY 



J. H. Ashdown Hdw Co., 
Geo. D. Wood & Co., 
Miller-Morse Hdw. Co., 
Jas. Robinson & Co., 
Lewis Bros., Lid., 




Winnipeg 



Montreal 



A slight 

pressure of the 

thumb 

regulates the 

flow. 



Maple City Manufacturing Co, 

Monmouth. III. 



27 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Some Facts About 



the 




Brand 
Hot 

Forged 
Horse 

Nails. 



\ 



The material of which they are made 
is the best obtainable, or used in the 
world for making horse shoe nails. It 
is a special quality of Swedish Charcoal 
Steel Nail Rods, combining the greatest 
strength and toughness — made ex- 
pressly for our purpose. 

We use the old reliable hot-forged 
process, by which the nails are 
hammered down from the end of the 
rod while at a forging heat. 

The nails produced by the cheaper 
and rival cold process have the heads 
upset cold, which crystalizes the 
material in the neck, making them 
more liable to break off at that point. 
The graduated taper and fine hardened 
bevel points of the "C" brand nails 
enables them to be driven into the 
hardest hoofs without buckling or 
breaking. 

They will hold the shoes on firmly 
under the most severe strain or hard 
usage, to which they are likely to be 
subjected. The quality is right, and 
the price is right. They have been 
"made in Canada" for over forty years. 

We solicit your inquiries and orders, 
and shall be pleased to furnish you with 
samples and other information, on 
application. DO IT NOW! 

Canada Horse Nail Company 

Established 1865. MONTREAL 

28 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




PROFITABLE LINES 

You are handling the best manufactured in 

Cutlery, Electric Plate and Solid 
Nickel Silver Flatware 

if the goods bear our stamps. The trade mark guarantees. 



QUALITY. 



FINISH. 



DISPATCH. 



The McGlashan, Clarke Co., Limited 

NIAGARA FALLS, - ONT. 

MR. J. MACKAY ROSE. 1 17 Youville Square. Montreal. Que. MR. N. F. GUNDY. 47 Hayter St.. Toronto. Ont. 

MR. DAVID PHILIP, 291 Portage Ave.. Winnipeg, Man. 




HOTTEST ON EARTH 



The No. 8 Alcohol Blow Pipe produces nearly 
3000 F. Will do lead burning on storage 
batteries. Produces a needle blue tlame pointed. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. 
Jobbers sell at factory price, $10.40 net. 



THE TURNER BRASS WOkKo 

53 MICHIGAN STREET, - CHICACO, U.S.A. 



******* World's Best Cutlery 

^B^^ (► J trf You make no mistake in specifying goods made by 

^ JOSEPH RODGERS &. SONS, Limited 

^•flNTED »" when ordering cutlery. A reputation of over 200 years 

at stake, insures the quality of every article. 

Write for catalogues from Sole Canadian Agents 

JAMES HUTTON & COMPANY, MONTREAL 



High-grade Bathroom Fixtures 





ARE MADE IN CANADA BY 



The Carriage Mountings Co., Limited, Toronto 



NO ACID OR GRIT 

will be found in "Majestic" polishes 
The brilliant and lasting lustre im- 
parted by " Majestic " polishes is 
not susceptible to atmospheric con- 
ditions and weather changes. 

Majestic' polishes are une- 
qualled for brass, copper, nickel 
and all finished metallic surfaces. 

Write for sample and prices. 

MAJESTIC POLISHES. Limited 

575 Yonfie Street - - Toronto, Canada 



Manufacturers' Agent s 

ALEXANDER "cTl B B 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker. 
13 8t. John 8treet, Montreal 



Representing Canadian, Ifritish and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence invited Irom 
firms wishing to be represented. 



CHARLES H. FOX 

Vancouver, Canada 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 
Selling to the Hardware Jobbers Only. 
Representing Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers, correspondence invited. Cable 
Address, Chastox Vancouver, P.O.Box 1105. 

H. W. MITCHELL 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Correspondence is solicited from manufacturers 
wishing a representative in Winnipeg. 

Travellers call regularly on the wholesale and 
retail trade in Western Canada. 

Highest references and financial responsibility. 



THE WAGGONER EXTENSION LADDER 

is the lightest, handiest, 
strongest and safest 
ladder made. Re-in- 
forced with steel wire. 
Patent safety lock. 
Made in all lengths from 
20-ft., 24-ft., 28-ft., etc., 
up to 100 ft. if desired. 
Every painter, tinner, 
stacker and farmer 
needs one 

Write for circulars 
and prices. 

The Wagoner Ladder Co., Ltd. 

LONDON, - - CANADA 

E. H. BrigysCo., Ltd., Western Representative 
Winnipeg, Man. 




JENKINS 4 HARDY 

Assignees, Chartered Accountants, Estste and 

Fire Insurance Agents, 15J Toronto St. . Toronto. 

465 Temple Building, Montreal. 




■ Covert Mfg. Go. 



7 77 



TROY, N.Y. 





Harness Snaps, Chain, « 
c Rope and Web Goods, ■ 
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HARDWARE AND Ml-; TAT. 



Drummers' Snack on Annual Frolic 

Alton Welcomes Travelers on Their 6th Jamboree — An Immortal Outing and a Record-breaking Snack— A Mammoth Con- 
cert, An All-night Serenade, a Costume Procession and an Afternoon of Sports Were the Features — 
Mass Meeting of Drummers' Snack Club Held and New Officers Elected. 

(From the Canadian Grocer.) 



Laugh, and ilic world laughs with you : 
Weep, and you weep alone. 

For the dear old earth must borrow its tnirth, 
It has trouble enough of its <>\\ n. 

Now this is a true saying, and worth} 
of all acceptation, for in it lies the full, 
perfect and sufficient reason tor tin' es 
istence of the Drummers' Snack. 

''To be great, one must have a his- 
tory," says Monmouth sagaciously ; "in 
have a history, one must have lived," 
he concludes a trifle obviously , and 
thus it is with the Drummers' Snack. 
They are great, tor they have a history 
(not necessarily that it follows) ; they 
have a history because they have lived 



obscurity it has attained to the recog- 
nition that it enjoys to-day. 

Seventeen years ago the Algie family, 
thru in the general stoic and woolen 
mills business at Alton, Ont., made .1 
practice o f annually entertaining, at a 
two days outing held in t he vicinitj of 
thf town, .til ilic travelers who pa 
through Alton during the veai The 
boys had nothing to do but come. The 
Algie family did the rest. As the years 
wenl by, and more trabelers were added 
to the list the function became too 
large and unwieldy for the Algie's to 
handle, generous and open-homed as 
the] were. The outing had by this 



of men who yearly since that date have 

been Belecti d to watch over ami direct 

Hairs. After Bill] Colville i 

I Cooper. Col. E. E W. Moore, Hob 

Charlie Smith, and Jack Charles, 
ami this year Vfike Mai— but of that 
tei 

A Trainload of Smiles. 

The sixth annual outing went to Al- 
ton on -July 20. It returned 36 hours 
later. There is the bare statement 
1 1< i e are the details. 

On Friday evening the C.P.R. took on 
a 1 1 .unload of assorted smiles at Toron- 
to, picked up small quantities of simi- 




Drummers' Snack — The baseball teams and some of their admirers. 



Individually they have seen the world, 
and human nature has become to them 
as an open book. Collectively they are 
unitetl, knit together in a bond of fel- 
lowship that shall endure with the sun. 
Of ..history they have no lack. The 
founding of their club was a perform- 
ance unattended by civic authorities, 
destitute of hackneyed and stereotyped 
speeches, unnoticed by the world, lack- 
ing even the conventional corner-stone 
laid by a worshipful hand. But in the 
very modesty of its inception lies its 
present strength. Through its initial 



time become an event to which a large 
proportion of the traveling world eager- 
ly looked forward, and its popularity 
was proved by the clamour that arose 
at the first hint of abandonment. A 
club was formed and officers appointed 
to take charge of the outing, and the 
Drummer's Snack was fairly launched 
upon its career. To Billy Colville fell 
the honor of being its first president, 
and should one seek a reason for the 
club's phenomenal growth and prestige 
since the election of its first chief officer, 
it is but necessary to glance at the stamp 

31 



lar freight at wayside stations dotted 
along the track, and three hours later 
orged the lot onto the Alton plat- 
form. 

The noise began at once. There was 
no waiting. Sol Walters' voice was 
heard raised in hysterical enquiry for a 
short cut to the cyclone cellar. He was 
suppressed, and persuaded under pres- 
sure to fall in line with the procession. 
The Alton citizen's band, presided oveJ 
by Cap. Alberton and Dr. Algie, headed 
by a profusely flagged and be-ribboned 
carriage, wherein Harry C'ofFen and 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Reeve Willougbby sat in state, and fol- 
lowed bv a bevy of little girls, cos- 
t timed in white dresses slashed with 
broad red ribbons, broke into a burst 
of melody and swung up the road. What 




Drummers' Snack — Will J. White and 
the Occasional Offender. 

does it matter what tune they played ? 
Every man in the procession sang a dif- 
ferent version of it, whatever it was. 
The net result, if not musically perfect, 
was at least harmoniously discordant. 
All Alton was at its doors, every ear 
was attuned to intercept those dulcet 
strains ; every eye was levelled at the 
procession. The latter, proudly con- 
scious of an exalted position, redoubled 
its efforts to give them something worth 
listening to. In this manner came the 
Drummer's Snack to Alton. 

The Concert. 



Long before eight o'clock, the hour 
set for the big concert, the mammoth 




Drummers' Snack — .Mike Malone, the 
new president. 

tent was stretching itself to accommo- 
date the audience. The tent itself is 
important enough to deserve a passing 
mention. Just an ordinary tent with 



no conceit about it at all, made of can- 
and built with an eye to solidity 
rather than beauty. Many tender mem- 
ories are associated with it by the mem- 
bers of the Drummers' Snack, Here is 
the home of the club, herein have the 
concerts been held from the beginning ; 
herein not infrequently have slumbered 
many dozen of the elect. Staunchly it 
has withstood the elements for many 
years, and more exacting test than this 
lias successfullv weathered the sonorous 
snores of Mr. Walters and Jack Charles. 
For once the expected came to pass. 
A general idea appeared to have circu- 
lated among the audience that some- 
thing out of the ordinary was going to 
happen. But was anybody gifted with 
imagination sumcient to foresee the net 
result ? If so, they were unfortunate 
in cheating themselves of the delights 
of anticipation. This is the programme 
presented by the Drummers' Snack for 
the critical appreciation of an audience 
prepared to be satisfied with anything : 




Drummers' Snack — John W. Charles, 
retiring president. 



1. Song, " The Wanderer."— Ford. 

Chas. Leslie. 

2. Contralto Solo, " 'Twas the Rose." 

— DcKoven. 

Miss Olive Belyea. 

3. Baritone Solo, ''In the Days of Old." 

— Nevin. 

Donald C. McGregor. 

4. Soprano Solo, " Sing, Sweet Bird." 

Shafera. 

Miss Bertha Crawford. 

5. Humorous Song, " Insanity." — 

Will J. White. 

fi. Duct, " Good-Night, Beloved."— 

Pensul i. 

Miss Belyea and Donald C. McGregor. 

Intermission, Selections by Alton Hand. 

The Piece de Resistance. 

Followed the chief event of the even- 
ing. This was the production by the 
Hamilton branch of the Snack, of a 
pathetically-humorous plantation sketch, 
called " The Darkey's Dream," written 
especially for the club by their old and 
well-tried friend John B. Nelligan, and 
produced in Canada for the first time. 

The four principal parts were taken 
by Bay Hill, Court Thompson. Col. 

3* 



John Stoneman, and Hy. Eckstien. but 
though they were conspicuously promi- 
nent, they didn't make an ounce more 
noise than the following promising 
bunch of amateur mummers :— Charley 




Drummers' 



Snack — The vice-president 

in kilts. 



Smith, Vernon Smith, George Smye, 
Neil Pufford, Peter Smith Bob Smith, 
Jas. Smith, Jack Smye, John Hooper, 
Ed. Zimmerman. To attempt to make 
any distinction among these last ten 
would be an abortive task, similar to 
splitting hairs. Let them be classed, as 
they would themselves desire— equally— 
neither with flattery nor derogatory re- 
marks ; only this must be said, they 
worked hard, they never wearied, they 
did their best, and it was a good best. 

The Artists. 

Bay Hill, the Hamilton Dockstadcr, 
Court Thompson, a disciple of Munion, 
by the great horn spoon, Col. John 
Stoneman, a master of the histrionic 
art, and Hy. Eokstien, who like Napo- 




Drummers' Snack— Will J. White and 
Billy Colville. 

leon, does things without talking, earn- 
ed individually in the highest degree the 
thunders of applause that again and 
again swept like a wave over the audi- 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Btice. John Nelligan must have been a 

proud man as he watched and listened 
BO the way his work was produced, and 
heard the manner in which the audience 
received it. Songs, cake-walks and 
dances were liberally interspersed 
throughout the performance, and it is a 
safe bet that most of the actors sur- 
prised themselves as much as they 



such. The irrepressible Mr. Walters, 
gathering around him a choice band <>i 
dime novel desperadoes, and arming his 
little company with torches and instru- 
ments of music, descended upon Alton, 
as a young tvphoon descends upon the 
luckless mariner. Barred doors and 
closed windows greeted them on every 
side. The inhabitants, having ascertain- 




Drummers' Snack — A bunch of baseball humorists. 



pleased the audience. The production of 
this play places us in a position flatly 
to contradict the rumour that the stage 
is going to the dogs. 

Of the other artists who took part 
i 1 the concert, special mention is al- 
mosl impossible, everyone of them was 
vociferously encored, some more than 
once. The professional talent, repre- 
sented by Miss Olive Belyea, Miss Ber- 
tha Crawford, Miss Hazel Bell, accom- 
panist, Donald McGregor and Will .1. 
White, gave their services for the even- 
ing freely and unconditionally. Will 
White, who was billed for only one song, 
gave nearly half-a-dozen. Charles Bod- 
ley was to have acted as accompanist, 
but upon his non-appearance, Miss Bell, 
who is herself a soprano of high note 
(top c, anyway 1 offered to officiate in 
bis stead. The duet by Donald McGreg- 
or and Miss Belyea seemed somehow to 
catch the hearts of the audience, and 
a burst of clapping and cheering broke 
out as the last note died away. " Cod 
Save the King " was sunt; in unison by 
the whole audience standing before the 
gathering broke up, and the old canvas 

oof fairly crackled with the strains. 

The Night's Work. 

All the articles attaching to their per- 
sons that could be conveniently got rid 
of, such as wives, sweethearts, sisters, 
children, friends and other impediments, 
were now escorted by the members to 
the station and carefully returned to 
Orangeville, whence they re-appeared 
next day in time for the games, sports 
and other frivolities that characterized 
the passing of that Jewish sabbath. 

But Friday night will not soon be 
forgotten in the annuals of the Snack 
Club. The man into whose mind enter- 
ed even a thought of slumber was a 
traitor to the cause, and branded as 



ed by annual and bitter experience ap- 
proximately what they might expect by 
attempting to parley with the enemy, 
have become at last wise in their gener- 
ation, and upon such occasions as this, 
retire silently and with what dignity 
?hey can command at ten o'clock sharp. 
Sol, his faithful little band at his heels, 
look a brief review of the situation and 



were promptly resucitated by Mr. Wal- 
who displayed a truly Napoleon r 
fortitude in the face of many discomfi- 
tures and i < • I > 1 1 fTs . About four a.m. the 
party attacked Bill A line's house and 
meed thru intention "i remainin) 

there lor the night. Mr, Algle poll 
showed them into the kitchen, where 
about a score of their less energetic 
comrades-in-arms were 1 already slumber- 
ing in peace. 

The Snack in Session. 
Al ]U o'clock on Sal unlay a > 
meeting of the club was held in the 
tent. Considering thai it was the morn- 
ing after the night before the attend 
ance was very creditable. President 

John \V. Charles occupied ill*- chair, mi 
his right and left hand, respectively, 
being f. < '. Hunt, the Toronto secre- 
tary, ami Robert Algie, of Alton, the 
home secretary. 

.M. P. Malone, the Hamilton seerc- 
tary, read the minutes, of the last meet- 
ing of the Snack, held several weeks 
ago in Hamilton to make arrangements 
lor the present outing, They were eon- 
firmed. The president then informed 
the meeting that under ordinary cir- 
cumstances the next item would be the 
treasurer's report, hut the present cir- 
cumstances being far from ordinary, 
owing to the absence of' I lie treasurer. 
Bill Irwin, and his presence by proxy 
in the shape of a mass of incomprehens- 
ible figures, he found himself somewhat 
at a loss for the correct method of pro- 
cedure. Having spent the whole morning 
trying to decipher them, he was now 
prepared to take the figures for granted 
coincident upon the accession of the 
meeting. The meeting was graciously 
pleased to access. 

Followed a pause, which Mike Ma- 
lone filled in a very timely manner bj 




Drummers' Snack—Part of the costume parade. 



commenced operations with a compre- 
hensive serenade of the entire town. No 
quarter was given, though in some 
cases as much as fifty cents was offered 
to anyone who would remove the mid- 
night Lotharios. The architecture of 
Alton was thoroughly analyzed, over- 
hauled and replaced as nearly as possi- 
ble in the same position. One or two of 
the band becoming hilariously hysterical 

33 



a short recitative descriptive of the 
way in which the expression "Sure 
Mike*' had first been brought to his 
notice. It was a good story, hut Mr. 
Malone made a mistake in trying to 
throw it at the meeting from the floor 
of the house. The house wouldn't stand 
for it and Mike had to take the plat- 
form. 



H \ K D \Y A R E A N T D META T. 



Robert AJgie, who during the intro- 
duction of ilus extraneous matter bad 
rved a gravity, but ill according 
with hi* eustoman smih'. now ruse, and, 
with some hesitation informed the meet- 
ing of :i partial victory over the ma- 
thematical mess of Bill Irwin, whose 




Drummers' Snack— Tin- winner of the 
Melagama tea race. 

.character and probable future, he de- 
clared himself willing, but unable to de- 
scribe. 

• - .\s far as 1 can learn/' said Mr. 
Algie, "the financial status of the club 
is on a very satisfactory basis. There 
is a handsome balance on the right side. 
.our concert receipts last night having 
been considerable.*' Toronto secretary. 
F. C. Hunt, confirmed this estimate with 
a statement of the exact amount taken 
at the concert, giving the president an 
opportunity to rise and remind the mem- 
bers that the spirit of the Snack was 
to have a good time not to amass large 
profits financially. 

A Vote of Thanks. 

•• While I'm talking," said President 
Charles, "1 want to ask everyone here- 
to pay tribute to Donald McGregor ami 
Will White, and all the Hamilton men 
and lady artists, aid to Charlie Leslie. 
We owe a big debt of gratitude also to 
that illustrious Dockstader, Bay Hill 
and his enthusiastic helpers. His per- 
formance was unique in character and 
daring in enterprise." A vote of thanks 
to all these members, coupled with the 
name of .John I',. Nelligan, was propos- 
ed, seconded and unanii isly adopted. 

while the canvas shook to the tune id' 
"They are jolly good fellows." 

Donald McGregor, Will White. Bay 

Hill. Bill Algie, John Nelligan and Col. 

Stoneman all replied to this evidence of 

appreciation according to their s< 

temperaments. Some replied wittily. 

modestly, some seriously and some 

humorously, but all enthusiastically and 

all characteristically. Will While with 

tir oi great sacrifice, --aid he'd soon 

.1 dog-fighl than a Snack ; that 

you couldn 'l bribe him to stay away, and 



that he'd be there next year as U 
ready to help in any way he could. 
Ba\ Hill, who doesn 't relish sp> 

making, said that his feelings coincided 

in a remarkable manner with those of 
.Mr. White and if it pleased the chair 
he would like to let it go at that. It 
didn't please the chair, so Day added 
that the feature of the whole Snack 
which had appealed to him most was 
the harmonious and frictionless manner 
in which Hamilton and Toronto had 
worked together for a common interest, 
that it had been a great pleasure lor 

him personally to do what he had done. 
and that he attributed the unique suc- 
cess of this entertainment to the mem- 
bers all having a definite object to work 
towards. Here he quoted some re- 
marks of Bill Algie, who was promptlj 
called upon to confirm or deny them. 
Mr. Algie started to speak of himself in 
a deprecatory manner, but was called 
to order with great sternness by the 
chair. Being driven to land on this 




Drummers' Snack— F.' C. Hunt, vice- 
president. 

tack. .Mr. Algie pul out on another one 
and referred with the deepest sympathy 
and respect to the memory of their old 
comrade and brother, Samuel E. Ryan, 
who was a prominent member of the 
Drummers' Snack Club and a favorite 
with everybody. Mr. Algie displayed to 
the members a handsome memorial 

hound in black morocco and engrossed 
in gold lettering, "Condolence of the 
Drummers' Snack Club," whose pre- 
paration had been in the hands of Boh 

Algie. The memorial read as follows: 

MRS. RYAN. 

The members of the Drummers' Snack 
Club desire to place a tiny forget-me- 
not on the grave of your late husband 
and to express to you their united sym- 
pathy in your bereavement. 

Our comrade and brother, Samuel E. 
Ryan, was a loved and loving husband, 

34 



an affectionate father, a good citizen, 
and an honest man. 

No nobler or grander epitaph can be 
inscribed on the greatest monument. 

A life well lived ends well at any 
time. Your husband lived, he loved, he 
was loved. This fills the vase of joy. 
The longest life contains no more. 

His old comrades in our social club will 
sadly miss his presence, which was al- 
ways cordially welcomed, either as an of- 
ficer, tried and trusted, or as a social 
companion, on the road, in the holiday 
camp, or at the festive board. 

The gentle, loving hand of time will 
partly heal the wounds made by the 
grim sergeant, and we realize that 
"words are but empty barren sounds" 
which are utterly inadequate to ex- 
press sympathy when death calls a dear 
one. 

In the windowless Palace of rest all 
must in time sleep, and we who are 
daily traveling towards the end of life's 
journey extend our best wishes to you 
and yours, 

Signed on behalf of the Club. 
JNO. W. CHARLES, 

President. 
ROBERT ALGIE, 

Secretary. 

A vote of thanks to those responsible 
I'm- this memorial, was proposed and car- 
ried. Mr. Algie's concluding remarks 
were characteristic of the man's great 
heart and generosity. "1 thank you all 
for coming to see us once again in the 
old place," he said, "and you all know- 
that as long as there is a square foot of 
ground in my house, or a crust of bread 
in the larder, no one id' you will ever 
have to go hungry. (Cheers). In con- 
cluding 1 must confess that this morn- 
ing 1 slide a ham from the cyclone cellar 
to I'vrA my 30 or 40 guests with. Hav- 
ing no defence I throw myself unre- 
servedly upon the mercy of the court." 
Discharged. 




Drummers' Snack— Sol Walters and 
the Comfort Soap Dace second 
prize winner. 

A Few Remarks. 
Jno. Nelligan, who was next called up- 
on, spoke feelingly <>f the spirit of uni- 
versal kindness, which was the key-note 



II \ R I) W A R E \ X I) M ETA L 



of the Snack. "The air of Alton is 
full of kindness," he said. "I'll try 
and write you something even better 
than ''The Darkey's Dream' next year, 
and L think 1 can do it, because the ob- 
ject for which 1 write will be an in- 
spiration in themselves." 

Col. Stoneman, M. 1'. Malone and 
Hy. Eckstein each said a few 



generdosly, and as enthusiastically as 

you did for the Bnack Of 1907. Anoth- 
er thing, I'm following a hard man — a 
popular man, a man who made las! year 

the most enthusiastic president we ever 

had. I refer to .lack Charles, and I 
don't expect to beal him. But with 
your help we'll give the Snack of 1908 
as little cause as possible to blush with 




Drummers' Snack— The Baby Show— The winner is in the go-cart, 



words, and Court Thompson was 
called out. Court proceeded in a digni- 
fied manner to the rostrum where he as- 
sumed the old Dr. Munion attitude. His 
listeners knew that one of the great 
truths of Dr. Munion was imminent, but 
there was no time for escape. "I've 
heard some of you people talking of 
shake-downs in Dr. Algie's house," he 
drawled. "Well," he continued with 
stern impressiveness, "I stayed out all 
night, and Dr. Munion says there is no 
punishment too great for those who 
neglect the afflicted." 

The president called on the membeis 
for any criticisms or suggestions. A. 
few were offered — tentatively- — and —ac- 
cepted — gracefully. A photograph was 
then taken of the rneet'.ig in session. 
The election of officers Avas next taken 
up, previous to which President Charles, 
in the course of a short address, .spoke 
highly of the help rendered him by the 
members of the executive. '"If I'd had 
an executive made to order," ho sail, 
"it couldn't have been improved upon." 

The New President. 

Col. Stoneman proposed M. P. Malone 
for the new president. Boh Keys sec- 
onded it and there being no dissenting 
voice. Mike was duly boosted to the 
platform. In his address of thanks, or 
welcome, or whatever it was, he remark- 
ed candidly: 

"It is no cinch to be president of the 
Snaek Club. It means hard work and 
lots of it. But I think that to be presi- 
dent of such a bunch as I see below me 
is well worth, a little trouble. I know 
you all. If I didn't I wouldn't take the 
office. But you'll all turn out and work 
for the Snack of 1008 as unselfishly, as 



shame by comparison with that of this 
year. Gentlemen, 1 thank you for the 
honor you have done inc." 

On the proposal of Bill Colville, an 
enthusiastic vote of thanks was tender- 
ed J. W. Charles for having made the 



Home jeeretarj (elected by acclama- 
tion) — Bob Algie. Mr. Algie also as- 
sumes the dutiefl of treasurer. He does 
the work anyway and miirht as well gel 
the title. 

Auditors — Peter Smith, Hamilton, and 

Will Mi en, Toronto. 

Hamilton executive (ieorgo Smyc, 
Hy, Eckstein, Bob Smith, Court Thomp- 
son. Col. John Stoneman, Jai. Hooper 
and ('has. Smith. 

Toronto executive — J. Wildfong, \Y. 
Meen. Sol. Walters, D. McGregor, W. J. 
White, N. Oakley, Jno. W. Charles, Q 
Campbell, T. Gloster, F. C. Hunt, Robt. 

The following were created honorary 

members — Jno. B. Xelli^an Ben Arthur, 
('has. Leslie, B. Mcintosh, of the Ceil 

tral Business College, Toronto; Alex, 
Earle, of Creemore, and Donald McGre 
gor. 

Amos Mason ami Boss MacKenzie 
were made assistants to the Beeretary. 
Before the meeting dosed, Bob Asher 
was presented with Bill Oplville's prize 

for having sold the most button-. Bob 
sold 32, and said it was pie. Snack but- 
tons cost $1 each and entitle the owner 
to full membership in the club. 

As the final wind-up to the meeting. 
William Algie recited a poem by Robt. 
W. Service, author of "'Songs of a Sour 
Dough." The poem, which was called 
"The Cremation of Sam M'Ghee," was 
of a humorous persuasion, and made a 
great hit. 

The Procession. 

Lunch was served to all who had ap- 
petites, by the ladies of the I'resbytei- 




Drummers' Snack— Members and friends in Win. Algie's grounds. 



Snack of 1007 the greatest in the history 
f\' Ihe club. 

For Next Year's Snack. 

The following officers were then elect- 
ed: 

Vice-president (an office created for 
the first time after some discussion) — 
P. C. Hunt, Toronto. 

Hamilton secretary Bay Hill. 

Toronto secretary -Robert Asher 



ian Church, in the Science Hall. One 
pqid 25 cents and ate all one could. 
The tare was e\t raprdinarilv trood value 
for the money, but this may have been 
on account of the ladies relying on the 
well-known generosity of all travelers 
to come forward at a slightly advanced 
price over the one asked. Their expec- 
tations, if they entertained any, were 
gratified many-fold. The boys dived in- 
to their pockets and wouldn't take anv 
ohange. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Alter lunch, came an event from which 
i lie writer, for one, has barely recover- 
ed. From the hill-top floated the strains 
Ol sad music, and down the street there 
swung a procession, so marvellous in 
composition, so unique in character, 
that one regrets the paucity of the Eng- 
lish language as a medium of descrip- 
tion Most Of the spectators are now 
happily reported to he convalescent, but 
many of them suffered severelj \ 
glance at the accompanying photograph 
will give the unprivileged outsnL 
faint, vague, and shadowy idea of the 
reality. Observe the illustrous Mr Sol 
Walters, consider that he was by no 
means the most picturesque of thai 
outrageous company, and in time you 
may tram your mind to comprehend in 
a dim way why Galbraith, the photo- 
grapher, is taking a forced holiday from 
business, To his credit be it said that 
he flinched not from the call of duty, 
but with clenched teeth and ashy coun- 
tenance exposed his plate and staggered 
back to the cvclone cellar 

When the kilted processionists reached 
nort's field; a baseball game was 




Drummers' Snack — William Algie — 
The Snack Club's friend. 

immediately arranged between a picked 
team from Toronto and Hamilton. It 
Listed most of the afternoon, and con- 
sidering the strict impartiality with 
which Col, Stoneman and Bay Mill 
handed out their decisions, was remark- 
ably devoid of friction. .Jack Charles, 
by lashing out a magnificent home-run 
in the last inning, secured the fruits of 
victory for the Toronto IX. The score 
was 13 to 11 Each member got a box 
of Old Abe cigars and Jack Charles, as 
captain, a tiny silver cup on a maho- 
gaay stand. The winners declared that 
the referees had conducted the game in 
an able manner. 

The teams were as follows:— 
Toronto :— .Jack Charles, captain, Bob 
Asher, F. C. Hunt, Tommy Gloster, 
Jack Wildfong, Bill Meen, Pud Oakley, 
A. R. Fraser. 

Hamilton —Bob Smith captain, Geo. 
Smye, Hy. Eckstien, Billy Miles, Fat 
Clifford, Court Thompson, Bill W'ark, 
Slim Arthurs, Ed. Nally. 



Meanwhile the games and sports were 
in full progress. The Sport's Commit- 
tee consisted of Win. ('olvillc. chairman; 
Col. Stoneman, referee , H. Asher ami 
1'. Smith, entrj clerks. The committee 
wile as follows :— William lrwm, Com I 
Thompson, William Meen, E. F. Clarke, 
Hob Keys, Guy Long and Sol Walters. 

The Sports. 

All the sports and competitions were 
pulled off in fine style, and reflect great 
credit on the management. The follow- 
ing list of the various events with th3''r 
winners, wherever it was possible to as- 
certain who were the winners, fail 1 J 
represents the large scale upon whi"h 
the whole programme was conducted 
Competitors in most of the events were 
almost too numerous to admit of per- 
fect handling. Sol Walters, smitten 
with the idea that he would like to 
help the committee, being one of thsrti 
himself, succeeded in making himself 
recognized to the extent of being on 
nine separate occasions forcibly removed 
from the grounds. But nothing could 
daunt that indomitable spirit, and Sol 
was never far away from the centre ol 
action. When last seen he was nuking 
for Orangcville, in his wake an iii'.ni 
ated mob of fellow-competitors, v ho 
with arms raised to heaven were 'ailing 
the very firmaments to witness that 
through the strategical ingenuity (only 
they didn't put it like that) of the man 
they were pursuing, they had been 
wrongfully defrauded of their just rights. 

It appears that Sol had stolen a 
march on them in one of the races, by 
rushing out of the crowd into the course 
when the judges were looking at oth- 
er people's sisters and finishing a yard 
or two ahead of the legitimate winner. 
So let us leave him, with best wishes for 
his success if he was captured, and con- 
dolences for his pursuers if he escaped. 

Baby show — 1st prize-winner may be 
seen in the go-cart in the photograph ; 
2nd prize, Clara Gracy; 3rd prize, Wm. 
Edward Algie; 4th, Dorothy Cockerene;^ 
5th, Baby Stevens. 

Past Presidents' race — 1st , Robert 
Keys; 2nd, Wm. Colville. 

Tug of war — Winning" team, Jack 
Burnett, R. L. McKenzie, William Algie, 
Joe, Dodds, John McLaughlin and Wm. 
Alexander. 

Ladies' Comfort Soap race — 2nd, Miss 
Hall; 3rd, Miss Smith; 4th, Miss Alex- 
ander; 5th, Miss Ada Saunders; 6th, 
Miss Oakley; 7th, Mrs. Smith; 9th, Miss 
Saunders; 10th, Miss Neeley; 11th, Miss 
Rodwi. 

Artists' race — 1st, Hy. Eckstein; 2nd. 
Ed. Nally; 3rd, F. C. Hunt. 

Musical race — 1st, Wm. Collins; 2nd, 
R. A. Scott; 3rd, Jim. Algie. 

Ladies' Blue Ribbon hockey broom 
match — Winning team, Miss Saunders, 
Miss Eddie Saunders, Mrs. Wilson, the 
Misses Mason and Miss Campbell. 

Needle race — 1st, B. Mcintosh; 2nd, 
J. H. Thurston; 3rd, F. C. Hunt. 

Three-deaded race — 1st, J. H. Thurs- 
ton, A. R. Fraser and R. M. Thurston; 
2nd, Walter Scott and company; 3rd, 
Bob Smith, Fred. C. Hunt and Jack 
Wildfong, 

Early-call race— 1st, Ed. Nally; 2nd, 
F. C. Hunt; 3rd, R. M. Thurston. 

36 



Frog race— 1st, Ed. Nally; 2nd, A. R. 
Fraser. 

Smoking race — 1st, Billy Mill; 2nd, 
Sol. Walters; 3rd, F. C. Hunt. 

Sank race — 1st, A. R. Fraser ; 2nd, Bob 
Smith; 3rd, Walter Scott. 

Fat man's race — 1st, Billy Mill; 2nd, 
Jack Charles; 3rd, Jack Wildfong. 

Kicking the football — 1st, Billy Meen ; 
2nd, B. Mcintosh. 

Married men 's race — 1st, Walter Scott 
2nd, Billy Meen; 3rd, 0. E. Wallace. 

Unmarried men's race — 1st, B. Mcin- 
tosh; 2nd, A. R. Fraser. 

Consolation race — 1st, F. J. White, of 
Melagama Tea; 2nd, F. Oakley; 3rd, 
Mel Tufford. 

F.J. White had a Melagama Tea race 
lor ladies. The names of the winners 
did not transpire, but a picture of the 
first lady home is shown elsewhere. 

On the sports field a big tent was 
erected, wherein was dispensed icecream 
fruit and cooling drinks. It was well 
patronized. 

Prizes for the various events were the 
gifts of the following travelers and 




Drummers' Snack — A fair spectator. 

firms: Tug-of-war, -1. W. Charles; base- 
ball match, Havana Cigar Co., cigars 
and silver cup; ladies' Comfort Soap 
race, silver salver and other prizes do- 
nated by the Comfort Soap Co., Aprons 
and soap supplied free. Little maidens' 

C fori Soap race — 12 rings given by 

the Comfort Soap Co. Blue Ribbon Tea 
hockey broom race, one pound of one 
dollar lea to each member of the win- 
ning team, donated by George F. Camp- 
bell. Boys' Comfort Soap race, twelve 
prizes given by the Com foil Soap Co. 
Three-headed race (a new one), three 
case pipes given to the first team by W. 
H. Steele, tobacconist, Toronto. Smoking 
race, "Mary Ann" cigars, donated by 
Manners & Son, of London, through 
their representative, Ed. Bingham. Foot- 
ball kicking contest, Sol. Walters. 

Envoie. 

So let us take our leave of the Drum- 
mers ' Snack. With a royal send-off that 
<amc straight from the hearts of the 
people of Alton, with a last cheer sent 
ringing back along the rails from the 
men and women in the* vanishing train, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



a memorable outing was at an end, and 
another frolic added to the credit of the 
Snack. 

And if, as Stevenson asserted, it is 
the duty of all men to be happy, surely 
this organization is fulfilling that duty 
in ihi highest degree. A club of men 
formed in the interests of clean mirth, 
of honorable enjoyment and of mutual 
service to one another, cannot well fail 
of success, and if the future of the Drum- 
mers' Snack Club is to be measured even 
proportionately by its past and present 
work, in after years a great body of 
men is destined to arise, whose motto, 
"Laugh and grow fat," will echo 
through the trackless wastes of the Si- 
berian desert, and tickle the risibilities 
of the humble Esquimaux in the bleak 
solitude of his frozen home. 

Short Snacks. 

The president wore kills. He's Scotch 

anyway. 

» * 
* 

As usual the star feature of the games 

was Rill Colville's Comfort Soap race. 

* * 

* 

Fred Hunt, the vice-president, came 

in third in more races than anyone. 

* * 
* 

Jack Charles cannot be beaten as a 

chairman. He knows how to keep things 

moving. 

* * 
« * 

Many of the boys were inquiring 

for Walter Armstrong, editor of The 

Canadian Grocer, who was away on his 

vacation. 

* • 
* 

What would a Snack be without Sol. 

He looked immense in kilts and used a 

broom for a sporan. 



The Snack resembled one huge, happy 

I'aimly picnic. The verdict retur 1 was 

'•The best ever!" There will h< 
appeal. 

« 
Will White, former member of the 
executive, now living in Vermillion, Al- 
berta, was wired the regrets of the club 
at his absence. 

» • 
• 

Jack Wildfong, of Gordon Mackay, a 

director of the Commercial Travel^-' 

Association, was on hand early. It was 

Jack's first visit, but he says he'll never 

miss a snack again. 

• * 

* 

The bonfire and freworks display 
which were held after the concert made 

a fit ending to a glorious night. As 

a home secretary. Hob Altaic has them nil 

skinned. He forgets nothing. 

• * 
* 

Some members of the defeated base- 
ball team were unkind enough to say 
that the Colonel's knowledge of the 
game antedated the new rules. And yel 
his decisions were perfectly satisfai 
to the winners. Incomprehensible! 
* 

A telegram was received by Bob Algie 
from George Nicholson, familiarly 
known as Big Nick. Nick was in Van- 
couver, B.C., and wrote "Sorry not with 

you. Success is my wishes to all." 

• * 

Mr. and Mrs. F.*J. White, of Mela- 

gama Tea, were interested spectators 

of the games. Bill Meen, who travels 

for Melagama, was very much to the 

fore in the races. He won several firsts. 
» » 
* 
Mike Malone, the new president, has 

his work cut out for him for next year's 

snack. This one was so good. But 





■~**^ T 








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mBhimm^I j 




T 




SKJ*-*? ^ i« 








thWf 


it 3 


i I J 


p 


Wt/A 




» kM t 


«M T i 


S 








IflP^J^B 


f 


&ss&^^ 




fl 



Drummers' Snack — The members in session. 
Bill Colville, as a games starter and everyone knows Mike, and when the 



general sports director, holds the belt 

He is energy personified. 

* • 
* 

John B. Nellisjan surpassed himself in 
"The Darkey's Dream." But he says 
he can write something better for next 
year's snack. 



time comes he'll deliver the goods. 
• 
Nowhere is there anybody just like 
Bert Menzies. During the Friday night 
serenade he kept the town alive 
sleepless by pounding the kettle drum. 
He made up in energy what he lacked in 
artistic feeling. 

37 



Tin- Bine Ribbon Tea nockey-bn 
match, under the able direction of 

•■ Campbell was an unqualified 
success. M.in', brooms were broken, bul 

alb. The Bingle ladies won fi| 
lv b\ a Bingle goal. 



CoL E. E. \V. Moore, whose kindly 

presence was BO gTOatlj missed at the 

snack, telegraphed to Jack Charles: 




Drummers' Snack— Bay Hill, the Ham- 
ilton Dockstader. 

"Sorry, cannot be with you. Best 

wishes for record snack." That his 

wish came true is now ancient history. 

• • 
* 

Bay Hill, the Hamilton Dockstader, 
was largely responsible for the success 
of the concert. Bay was made up as an 
old nigger, and acted, as well as looked, 
the part. With Bay Hill and Bob Asher 
as the Hamilton and Toronto secretaries, 
the success of the next snack is already 
assured. They are untireable. 



IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE. 

A theatrical manager was holding 
forth on the value of publicity the other 
day and pointed his moral with this : 

"When the teacher was absent from 
the school room, Billy, the mischievous 
boy of the class, wrote on the black- 
board : 

' 'Billy Jones can hug the girls bet- 
ter thqn any boy in the school.' 

" I'pon her return the teacher called 
him up to her desk. 

" 'William, did von write that 9 " she 
asked, pointing to 1 lie blackboard. 

' 'Y'es, ma'am,' said Hilly. 

" 'Well, you may stay after school,' 
said she, 'as punishment.' 

' The other pupils waited for Billy to 
come out, and then thev began guying 
him. 

" 'Got a licking, didn't vou ? ' 

' 'Xope,' said Billv. 

" 'Got jawed ? ' 

" 'Xope.' 

What did she do?' they asked. 
Shan't tell,' said Billv. ' but it 
pays to advertise.' " 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



What To Do This Month 



All men are good spurts ;ii heart. They 
alw a> s on the trail, whetbi i il be 
for money, fbr wide reputation, for 
amiable life-partners, or for mas- 
kinonge, for deer, for foxes, or rabbits. 
It depends largely upon their appropria- 
tion how mncfa fun they will get out of 
the sport. Ii i> certain thai only money 
ean gel money, and often ii requires 
money t<> win a buxsom maiden, and 
money coupled with a longing for lh<' 
wild t<> be able to land hiu game in the 
woods and in the river. 

Little pressure is needed to effect the 
sale of a shotgun or sectional fishing rod 
to a good sport. He wants to have theiu 
a> much ;b the store-keeper wants to 
sell them. A good deal of diplomacy ami 
patience i> essential to sell a gun to a 
man who is not quite certain whether 
he wants it or not. He is the indifferent 
Sport. There are no bad sports. 

Ii is up to the hardware merchants 
this month to make the indifferent sports 
good ones ami convince them that they 
need guns ami other autumn sporting 
requisites in order to spend what the 
Londoner calls ""a decent time" in the 
fall months. It will be well for the 
merchants not to ignore those who have 
always bougbl guns ami who neve-, 
would be without them. They must he 
looked after. 

To wholesalers the latter pari of 
August ami September has come to be 
an almost proverbially had lime to hook 
orders. The travelers come in to the 
cities at the week-end thoroughly dis- 
gusted with their week's luck. "All 
the merchants," they say, "are trotting 
around to the fairs, and there's no 
catching them." Obviously, if there 
are no fish in the brook there will be 
few bites. Such times however, can. be 
profitably spent by retail clerks in re- 
arranging stocks for busier months. 

Every year the jobbers are emphasiz- 
ing more ami more the importance, the 
necessity to the retailer of getting his 

orders hooked early. This fall undoubt- 
edly will be a bumper season for hunters. 
and those merchants who are going to 

derive the greatesl aim I of business 

from the game-seekers will book their 
orders now for all lines of sporting 
goods for the fall anil winter, such as 
'_ r uns. ammunition, skates, hockey slicks. 
pucks, snowshoes, moccasins, and curl- 
er-' supplies. The farmer must not he 

forgotten and a good stock of cow-ties. 

halters, blankets, sleigh hi Us. etc.. should 

be ordered during the next two or three 
weeks in order to insure prompt ship- 
ment. Let not the retailer he respon- 
sible for delays in shipments. 

A- for the display of fall ami winter 
goods, a model window of sporting 
will be illustrated. described, ami 
criticized in the next issue of this paper 
on the •"'Window Display" \> 



Cow chains can he effectively display- 
ed in the front window by hanging them 

from the ceiling and having them meet 
to form different 'diagrams in the centre 

of the window, making them as the 
centre work for some display of cut- 
ler) or mechanics' tools. A good way of 
displaying horse blankets and robes is 
by suspending them from the ceiling 
above the counters. It is easy to show 
sleigh hells lo good effect as they have 
in their burnished surfaces an attrac- 
tiveness independent of their arrange- 
ment. Merchants will do well lo display 
I hem in the front window as they are 
the most attractive of all the fall and 

winter stock. 

* * 
* 

Cany a full line of fall ami winter 
goods and, besides pushing their sale 
in your store, accentuate them in your 
fall advertising in the local papers. 
Don't be foolish enough to allow your- 
self t<> think that money expended in 
judicious advertising is foolishly spent. 
A wise advertising campaign will in- 
crease your business to an extent you 
never dreamed of. In this connection 
the New York Evening Journal is con- 
stantly trying to educate businessmen 
on the value of advertising and for that 
purpose is publishing daily hints which 
deserve consideration by all who suc- 
ceed in business. Here are a few valu- 
able sentences from one of that paper's 
recent sermons on advertising: "The 
Non-advertiser Lays the Other Man's 
Advertising Bills. — Does the man who 
doesn't advertise ever stop to think thai 
he is the one who really pays the ad- 
vertising bills of the man who booms 
his business? The advertiser himself 
isn't out. for he lifts back four-fold in 
increased business. The customer 
doesn't pay for the ads. for he can buy 
heller goods, from a larger assortment, 
al lower prices, from the man who is 
constantly turning over and renewing 
his slock, than from the one whose 
goods are carried over season after sea- 
son. It's the non-advertiser who pays 
for his lack of initiative and enterprise 
in decreased sales and dwindling pro- 
fits. The profits are all going to the 
other fellow to pay for more advertis- 
ing." 

Those who carry a stock of stoves ami 
heating supplies should already he think- 
i ways and means lo increase their 
sales in these during the coming autumn. 
When you begin to display your stoves 
don't keep the same stoves standing al- 
ways in the same places. Change them 
around once in a while. Put the big 
basebumer where you hail the Bteel 
range ami let the oak ami gasoline stove 

Then get out the stove 
blacking and brush ami allow your as- 
sistant to Umber up hie arm. People 
will think you have some new stoves 
in till you tell them you haven't. Don't 
forgel to make the show window sell 

38 



sio\cs lor you, either. For a while yet 
the window is too valuable for other 

things to give il up lo stoves, still if you 
can gel a small gasoline stove in one 
cornel- or work a camp stove in effec- 
tively with other camping goods, do 

it. In the fall, when stoves are the 

thinu ( (l p US jj bard, let the window do 

Us share by making new ami attractive 
displays of stoves from time to time. 



What are you doing to clear off the 
balance Of this season's stock of lish- 
illg tackles ( The sumemr will soon be 
over ami you will want your money to 
pay for fall goods which will soon be 
arriving. You cannot afford to devote 
valuable space in your store to stock 
which will not move again for another 
year. 1 have heard of one dealer who 
made a silent salesman display id' fishing 
tackle last week and as an inducement 
to sportsmen and holiday-seekers, of- 
fered a couple of fly baits as a bonus 
with every dollar's worth of tackle sold; 
the experiment worked well and his sales 
in I his class id' goods were largely in- 
creased. You may not use the same 
plan, but the method is immaterial as 
lone as you get busy in this regard and 
are not left with a heavy stock of tish- 
ing tackle to carry through the winter 
months. 

* * 

Are you satisfied with your seasons 
sale of sporting goods ? If not, what 
have you done to create .1 demand for 
the goods you have been handling '.' 
The amount of your sales in sporting 
goods will depend largely on creating a 
demand for sporting requisites in the 
town in which you live, ami the sooner 
this fact is realized by si>me hardware 
dealers, the better it will be for their 
business. One of the most effective 
methods that can be used by the trade 
in small towns to arouse interest in 
baseball, lacrosse, football, or any 
other sport, is for Hie merchant to have 
his son, clerk, or any of his employes 
join a local team, and ' thus be instru- 
mental in helping to keep the enthusi- 
asm of the local players at the highest 
pilch. The next thing to be done by 
the dealer after the team has been or- 
ganized, is to sell them uniforms at the 
lowest price possible, or e.v.!?i at actual 
cost, as afterwards he will realize 
enough on the rest of the cluh's trade 
to make up for the lost profit on the 
uniforms. After the team lias been sup- 
plied with uniforms, hats, halls, etc , 
and the grounds selected, it would he 
good policy on the part of the dealer 
in the case of a baseball club, to erect 
.1 backstop, and set forth on it in large 

letters that his house is the headquar- 
ters for all kinds of baseball and sport- 
ing supplies. A window display of 
goods a couple of weeks before the sea- 
son for each individual sport commences 
will also arouse interesl and .put the 
sport inji members of the community in 
the notion ol buying. Your display will 
also advertise the fact that you have 
.1 complete line of sporting goods, hikI 
will capture for you much local businea 



HARDWARE AND METAL 















Business Management 

By HOWARD R. WELLINGTON, 




The Management of a 
Retail 8tore. 
















In introducing a subject of this nature a few general 
remarks might not be out of place as to the recognized 
value of method and system in every business, qoI only 
as to the recording of transactions from a bookkeepn , 
point of view, but in every department of the business. 
The young man who lacks "order" will, nineteen times 
out of twenty, fail to succeed. The merchant should cul- 
tivate systematic habits in his own work. If it is known 
among his clerks and employes that the same hour each 
morning will find him in his store or office, this very fact 
will infuse punctuality throughout the house. The vvoik 
should be systematically distributed among the clerks 
and each article of goods should have its special place, 
convenient of access and ready to handle. The clerks 
should be so thoroughly familiar with their stock that 
all reasonable questions can be answered promptly. 

Buying. 

The old maxim "Goods well bought are half sold" is 
truer to-day than ever before. Nearly every mercantile 
failure finds about half the stock so old and shopworn 
and dusty and dead as to be almost unsalable, even under 
the hammer. An elaborate system of stock records may 
be installed from which the merchant may know at any 
period just what stock he carries of each line of goods, 
but as a usual thing neither merchant nor clerk, es- 
pecially in a small store where all the work is done by 
two or three, has time to post up the sales of goods. 
A practicable method would be to have an indexed book 
arranged alphabetically, in which might be entered the 
goods required from time to time to assort the stock 
depleted by sales. These goods may then be ordered by 
mail each week or through traveling salesmen, if they 
call regularly. 

Of course in a large store it is advisable to keep a 
complete record of all goods bought and sold, also prices, 
both cost and selling, and this may be done by means of 
stock cards arranged alphabetically and ruled in some 
convenient way, such as the following : 



better impression on the mind of a customer than at- 
tractive display of the stock, keeping to the front such 
articles as are likely to attract trade ; remanants and 
"dead stock" instead of being put out of reach on the 
top shelf are carefully sorted, specially marked down, and 
so displayed and advertised as to be easily worked off. 
Always bear in mind that "the first loss is the smallest 
loss" on goods which have been carried in stock too 
long. 

The Location of Your Business. 
In the retail trade the location is a very important 
matter. Trade centres around centres. People do not 
like to go out of their way to buy things. An inferior 
or small store in a good location is preferable in every 
case to a fine large store poorly located. Jut a little 
around the corner is not as good as on the corner. Two 
or three steps up is not as good as on a level with the 
sidewalk. A rent of $400 on the main street may appear 
high as compared with $10 a month three or four doors 
from the main street, but the rent is only ten times as 
great and there may be twenty-five shoppers on the main 
street for every one who passes up a side street. A 
Boston dealer made money enough in a little three-angled 
room scarcely big enough for three customers at once, 
but located on a famous corner,- to build one of the 
largest and finest business blocks for which the city is 
noted. 

Selling. 

Endeavor to impress upon your salespeople the ab- 
solute necessity of cultivating a memory for faces and 
names. A customer who is addressed by name feels a 
certain personal interest in the store where purchases are 
made, and it goes a long way toward making a sale. It 
is not the quantity, but the quality of speech, which tells. 
The successful salesman knows how to talk, what to 
talk about, and, more especially, when to stop talking. 
To say the right thing at the right time is not nearly 
so difficult as to say nothing at the right time. The 
seller should only talk enough to keep the buyer talking. 



VELVET — (BLACK SILK) 



Dale. 


From Whom 
Purchased or 
Total Sales. 


Bought. 

10 yds. 


Sold. 


Balance. 


Cost. 


Selling. 


Profit. 


Mar. 25 


J. S. & Co. 
Sales 






$1.00 


$1.50 


50 


" 28 


5 


5 















This card would be filed alphabetically, the purchases 
posted up from the purchase invoices and the sales from 
the sales files for the day, week or month, whichever is 
thought advisable. 

The Character of Your Business. 

Strive to maintain, as far as possible, a reputation 
for sterling values and moderate prices. The customer, 
who leaves your store feeling that he has secured an 
article which is good value, is the best asset a merchant 
has in building up a business. Nothing will create a 



The faculty of holding trade, or of selling repeatedly to 
the same people, is the highest attribute in the qualifica- 
tions of a successful salesman. 

Understand thoroughly what you are trying to sell. 
Know your goods, believe in yourself, and you are sure 
to inspire confidence in the buyer. There is an old 
maxim : 

"When you buy, keep one eye on the goods, the other 
on the seller ; when you sell, keep both eyes on the 
buyer."— Dry Goods Review. 



39 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware^ Metal 



Established 



The MacLean Publishing Co. 



Limited 
JOH.y BAYME MACLEAN 



President 



Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circulate in 
the Provinces of British Columbia, Alberta. Saskat- 
chewan. Manitoba. Ontario. Quebec, Nova Scotia. 
New Brunswick. P.E. Island and Newfoundland. 
offices : 

Montreal. 232 McGill Street 

Telephone Main 1255 

Toronto 10 Front Street East 

Telephones Main 2701 and 2702 
Winnipeg, - - - 511 Union Bank Building 

Telephone 3726 
London, Eno. .... 88 Fleet Street. EX. 

J. Meredith McKim 
Telephone, Central 12960 
branches: 
Chicago. III. - - - - 1001 Teutonic Mdg 

J. Roland Kai 
St. John. N.B. - - - No. 7 Market Wharf 
Vancouver. B.C. ... Geo. S. B. Perry 

Paris. France - Agence Havas, 8 Place de la Bourse 
.Manchester. Eno. ... 92 Market Street 

ZURICH, Switzerland ... Louis Wolf 

Orell Fussli & Co. 
Subscription, Canada and Unitid States, $2.00 
Great Britain, 8s. 6d., elsewhere - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

. ,, , ,, f Adscript, London 

Cable Address | Adscri £ t , Canada 



WESTERN POSTAL SERVICE. 

Complaints of inadequate postal ser- 
are still heard from all parts of 
Western Canada and lately the Winni- 
; . _ Free Press devoted an entire page to 
the extracts from complaints from sub- 
scribers as to late delivery of their 
papers. Every other paper circulating 
in the west could tell a similar story 
and western businessmen are suffering 
serious losses through delays in the de- 
livery of their correspondence. 

At the recent convention of the As- 
sociated Boards of Trade of Western 
Canada this grievance came up for dis- 
cussion and a strong resolution was 
passed calling the attention of the de- 
partment to the serious state of affairs 
now existing. Tn the course of the dis- 
■ li F. T. Fisher, ex-secretary of the 
Edmonton Board of Trade, told how the 
trouble had been dealt with in Edmon- 
ton and his remarks pointed out a 
remedy. One year ago Edmonton had 
probably the worst postal service of any 
town in the west and the businessmen 
wire loud in their complaints. But 
complaints that are not specific seldom 
accomplish much and this is the reason 
why the west has been complaining so 
long and getting so little redress. The 
Edmonton Board of Trade tooh the mat- 
ter up in a businesslike way and soon 
accomplished results. The secretary re- 
quested the businessmen of the town 
ive him the envelopes of all de- 
layed letters received. Soon he had a 
collection of envelopes, the post 
marks on which showed long and vexa- 
tious delays in delivery. These were 
forwarded to the department authorities 

and very soon an inspector was in Ed- 
monton looking into the matter and in- 



vestigating the causes of all these de- 
Lays. Edmonton businessmen estab- 
lished conclusively the fact that they had 
a serious grievance and to a great ex- 
tent that grievance has been redressed. 
The Edmonton plan might, with ad- 
vantage, be followed in every town in 
the west and specific complaints of this 
kind could not possibly be overlooked. 
It' the readers of this paper would go to 
the secretaries of their local hoard of 
trade and induce them to collect evi- 
dence of inefficient postal service accord- 
ing to the simple, direct method fol- 
lowed by Mr. Fisher in Edmonton, there 
would soon be in the hands of the postal 
authorities a mass of evidence that 
would compel instant action. 



EDMONTON IN THE CENT BELT. 

Startling news comes over the wire 
from far off Edmonton. If information 

received at this office is correct the Al- 
berta capital is now within the limits 
of the •"Cent Belt" and the inhabitants 
of lliat once progressive, ambitious, 
hustling and truly western city, if they 
fail to resent in truly western fashion 
the shameful innovation introduced by 
a newcomer from Charlottetown, P.E.I., 
will be no better than their benighted 
friends whom they have left behind in 
the "effete east" where it is said that 
occasionally the collection plate on Sun- 
days receives more coppers than silver. 
As every person knows it has for years 
been the proud boast of the Western 
Provinces that nothing of less value 
than the five cent piece was accepted 
by the western people. Newspapers have 
sold for five cents and until recently 
ninety-eight-cent and thirty-seven-cent 
articles have been quite unknown in the 
territory west of the Great Lakes. The 
genuine westerner has despised the red 
copper and for years the east has been 
referred to in derision as the "Cent 
Belt" of Canada. A man offering a red 
copper on the streets of Winnipeg or in 
any of the western towns for a news- 
paper, the price of which was plainly 
marked one cent, would incur the scorn 
and derision of the newsboy and every- 
one would know that he had just got 
oft: the train from the east. Two years 
ago the opening in Winnipeg of the 
branch of a big Toronto departmental 
store had the effect of introducing cop- 
per to the people of the Manitoba 
capital, and people Living farther west 
have been sorry to find that the "Cent 
Belt" was creeping towards them. The 
startling news now comes from Edmon- 
ton that a Mr. Sentner who hails from 
Charlottetown, P.E.I., is determined to 
introduce red cents in that city. The 
punsters might say that his name would 
imply his fondness for that particular 
kind of currency that is so much de- 

40 



spised in the Western Provinces. Con- 
sternation reigns in the Alberta capital. 
Are the people iii thai citj to be no 
better than the old boge3 easterners who 
live in Toronto or are they to be even 
as the weaklings who live in Winnipeg"? 
Is Mr. Sentner to be allowed so to de- 
grade Edmonton from her proud posi- 
tion .' Is Edmonton to be included with- 
in the "Cent Belt.'" What will they 
say in Calgary where I lie red coppers 
are still despised 1 ? 

Perish the thought that Edi lton 

should submit to this outrage. Four or 
five years ago a peddlar is said have 
visited Nelson, B.C., and to have offered 
eoppers as change to the people 
of that thriving city. It was 
more than flesh and blood 

could stand, and the story goes that lie 

was given a bath in the Kootenay and 

driven hack to the east where he be- 
longed. Since that day oo merchant 
has been so rash as to attempt the in- 
troduction of coppers in Nelson, and it 
is not to be expected that the people of 
Edmonton will submit to that which 
Calvary and Nelson would never have 
allowed. Air. Sentner is a rash man and 
we predict for him a speedy exit from 
the Alberta capital. 



ADOPT NEW IDEAS. 

A good suggestion made by an ex- 
change is that every merchant should 
have a new idea book. Many new ideas 
come to you in crude form as time goes 
by. Have a place to put them down. 
You can develop them and work them 
out to a practical conclusion as you get 
to them. 

Remember that many new ideas are 
old ones made over. You may see what 
some merchant is doing in another part 
of the country and by working it over 
you can apply it to your local condi- 
tions. It. works just as effectively with 
your people as if you picked it red hot 
from the sun itself. Constant studying 
of your problems will bring ideas. What 
your competitors are doing will furnish 
ideas for you. Never be backward about 
selecting the good things in your com- 
petitor's methods and work them into 
your own program as time goes by. If 
your own store makes the right impres- 
sion upon your community you must first 
have it right within itself. Your store 
staff and you yourself must believe 
earnestly in yourselves. The founda- 
tion of your progress should be your 
belief that, you are giving' your trade a 
square deal. 

To go farther, you should have faith 
all of the time that you are giving the 
same quaLity for less money in many 
lines than can be purchased at other 
Stores or of any competitors, no matter 
where they may be located. If you are 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



a progressive merchant, interested in 
your business and mindful of your op 
portunities, you are confident that you 
arc doing that. 

Mere boast and loud talk does not 
accomplish this. The work of your 
store from day to day, the number of 
satisfied customers you make, tells the 
story. And as each day and 
each week go by in your talks with 
customers, in your talks with clerks 
and in your talks to the genera! public 
through your advertising, keep your 
faith in yourself, your values, and your 
business well to the front. 

Believing so thoroughly in yourself, 
you will find that time brings to you 
many people who have learned to be- 
lieve as you do. 



FIRE INSURANCE RATES. 

If you are paying a high rate of in- 
surance, what are you doing to reduce 
the rate? Insurance is a steady expense 
and its cost is based on a schedule 
which charges something for every de- 
ficiency in building construction for 
every lack of precaution against fire 
thai you can be charged with. 

Are you known as a careless man in 
these particulars? Do you allow waste 
paper and any other inflammable ma- 
terial to collect in the basement, around 
stairways, or in the rear of the build- 
ing? 

Have you failed to keep the chimneys 
in good condition? Have you endeavor- 
ed to so manage things that the stove 
pipe will not have to pass through so 
many walls, floors, or partitions? 

Just where do you stand with the in- 
surance companies? What is the sched- 
ule of items fixing the status of your 
fire risk? You can get this list through 
your insurance broker. Get it and see 
where you can improve your position 
and reduce your rate. 

Make a few changes in the construc- 
tion of the building, in the arrange- 
menl of stock, and in the habits of your- 
self and clerks around the store, and 
when you are done you will have pulled 
the rate down. 

Always be an enthusiastic advocate 
and supporter of a fireman's organiza- 
tion in your town. Be in favor of good 
fire equipment and enough of an ap- 
propriation to have it well taken care 



and keenly watching the operations of 
the machines. 

Occasionally some expressions of skep- 
ticism were heard, but the generally ex- 
pressed opinions were that it is only 
a question of time — and a short time, 
too — when . these machines will be in 
general use. The devices themselves 
were their own strongest advocate 
showing how one man and a machine 
would do the work of several molders, 
giving promise that each shop will be 
able to turn out more work at a de 
creased cost. 

The fear most often expressed was 
that the union molders will make a 
fight against the general introduction 
of the machine, but it is to be hoped 
that such will not be the case. History 
has shown the futility of all such strug- 
gles against the evolution of manufac 
ture. It has been demonstrated over 
and over again that machinery, instead 
of lowering wages, results in the final 
betterment of conditions, both as to 
wages and as to the hours that men 
have to work, and journeymen molders 
will be standing in their own way if 
they fight the introduction of successful 
machinery. If they know their own in- 
terests they will welcome the day when 
molding machines have been brought to 
perfection, and placed in general use. 



The remedy may be found in the estab- 

our 
national schools. 



ADVENT OF MOLDING MACHINE. 

No feature of the recent foundry con- 
ventions at Philadelphia attracted more 
attention than the exhibit of molding 
machines. The booths where the vari- 
ous devices for turning out castings 
were being demonstrated were constant- 
ly surrounded by curious and interested 
crowds of foundrymen, asking questions 



CONCRETE SCHOOLS. 

It has been suggested by a number 
of recent writers in the American in- 
dustrial pr,ess that separate depart- 
ments for the education of those en- 
gaged or preparing to engage in con- 
crete architecture be established in the 
colleges and universities throughout the 
country. That such a suggestion is 
highly plausible is obvious. We cannot 
have too much or too highly technical 
education for our architects. After all 
the science of architecture is perhaps 
the most important of the sciences of 
our day. To have our nation solidly 
established we must have our houses, 
our stores, and our factories built well. 
If our buildings are not durable, neither 
is our nation. 

Skilful concrete architecture means 
economy of material. J. F. Haskin. in 
the Detroit Free Press (June 12) makes 
this startling assertion: "The enormous 
gri wth of the use of reinforced con- 
crete in building construction wastes 
more lumber than any other one line of 
business. As much timber is used in 
the boards into which the concrete is 
poured as would be used in an ordinary 
brick building. This lumber is usually an 
almost total loss." If such a waste of 
material is always the case in the erec- 
tion of concrete buildings, it is very 
needful that some remedy be looked for. 

41 



EMPLOY SYSTEM IN SHIPPING 

In the in.) .101 11 \ 01 ii.u dwate si 1 
is being lost every day bhro 
1 in- merchant's neglect ol freight bills 
and all matters pertaining to the 
proper transportation ol merchandise; 
for this reason freight matters should 
in e-ive 1 la- most careful at tention. 

There is good money to he made 101 
the time spent in figuring over freight 
hills and making out claims for 
charges. It is an easy matter to ob- 
tain from your agent ami your jobbers 
the correct freight rates on rail, class 
of goods you handle, and this informa- 
tion will enable you to speedily check 
over the rates charged on your fn 
hill to see that sonic railway clerk has 
not given the shipment too high a rate. 
You will see the necessity for doing 
this, when you learn that a railway 
clerk who makes an error which costs 
the company money, always has to 
stand the loss himself. It is only na- 
tural then, when there is any doubt on 
the part of the clerk as to exactly what 
classification your goods should come 
under, that you may he charged 1 he high- 
est rate. 

Those merchants who use system in 
stripping will hardly credit the fact that 
some retailers return their goods with- 
out advising the jobber or manufacturer 
that the goods are being returned. Many 
wholesale houses are forced to enter 
these in an " unknown book " until 
weeks afterwards the matter crops 
up in settling the account. It is only 
right that the retail merchant should 
advise the concern to whom the ship- 
ment is returned as soon as the goods 
start for the depot. 

Do not allow yourself or your dray- 
men to receipt for goods that have not 
been received. Check the number of 
packages received against fbe express 
receipt or freight bill carefully. 

If packages are in damaged condition 
when received, have your local freight 
agent endorse " in bad order " on the 
freight bill. Then have him come to 
your store and check the goods over 
with you after the cases are open. 
Make a hill against the railroad com- 
pany for the lost or damaged goods. 
It unable to gel redress from the rad- 
io, ol company, ask your wholesaler to 
help you. 

All railroads have what is termed a 
minimum charge, which is the lowest 
amount they will charge, no matter how 
small the shipment. Hear this in mind, 
and it will save you many dollars in a 
year ; when sending in a special order 
for some small thing, glance around 
your store and take a scpiint through 
vour order book and you will invariably 
find that there is something else you 
will need before long that can be order- 
ed with that shipment. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE TRADE GOSSIP 



Ontario. 

A. K. Harding, harness dealer, King- 
ston, Out., lias assigned to J. Lemmon. 

B. B. Scriven, Otterville, Out., is ad- 
vertising a tinsmithing business lor sale. 

.1. 11. Henderson, hardware merchant, 
Niagara Falls. Ont., spent Wednesday 
of iast week in Toronto. 

The death occurred recently oi Jacob 
Hose, a partner of the hardware firm of 

S GaimitV. Kenora. Out. 

Q. Adams, of the hardware fir:- 
J. Q. Adams & Co.. Etavensworth, Ont., 
was in Toronto last Saturday. 

S •'. Frame, with the firm of Jenkins 
A Hardy, Toronto, has left (he Queen 
City on a couple of weeks' holidays. 

Among hardwaremen noticed in To- 
ronto on Friday was W. M. Knight, 
Maple, and Geo. Peaker, Brampton. Ont. 

F. H. Heade. buyer for the Kennedy 
Hardware Co.. Toronto, is spending a 
couple of weeks holidaying in Mus- 
koka. 

.May Bros., Toronto Junction, have 
taken possession of Thos. Hoar's old 
stand and are conducting a general 
hardware business there. 

K. A. Cameron, with the wholesale 
hardware firm of H. S. Howland, Sons 
& Co., Toronto, left that city last Sat- 
urday for a two weeks' vacation. 

Frank F. llallitt. of the firm of Hal- 
lit t & Bradley, hardware merchants. 
plumbers, etc., Gshawa, was married on 
July 1 8th to Miss Phee Hezzlewood, of 
the same town,. 

David Mann. Toronto, has bought out 
the Pmkerton Hardware Co.. and has 
opened out a general hardware busi- 
ness ai 7(i(i Bathurst St.. in that city. 
Mr. Mann will carry a full line of hard- 
ware, cutlery and tinware. 

Edward Hawes, of Hawes & Co., 
Toronto, dealers in stove and shoe pol- 
. is spending two or three months 
in England, among old friends. Just 
at present he is enjoying a few weeks 
in London. He will return about the 
middle of August. 

F. C. Baker, customs house clerk, for 
Rice Fewis & Bon, Toronto, has left 
for the north to spend a couple of 
weeks' vacation in Magnctcwan district. 

Mr. Smith, of the hardware firm of 
Smith and Schaefi'er. Bolton, Out., was 
in Toronto on Wednesday. 

The condition of Harry Wilson, 
traveler for II. S. Howland. Sons & Co., 
wholesale hardware merchants, To- 
ronto, is somewhat improved. For the 
pa-t four weeks Mr. Wilson has been 
confined to a private hospital in the 
Queen City, suffering from an attack 
of typhoid fever. 

Quebec. 

LeCUyer cV Daniel. Montreal, plumb- 
ers, have dissolved partnership. 

H. .1 H. Douglas, of Caverhill, l.ear- 
mont & Co., Montreal, is away on a 

holiday. 



W. Ik Mart in . w ho brat els for < !at ei 
hill, Learmonl & Co., Montreal, in the 
Sudbury district, was in Montreal last 

week 

II Sylvestre, hardware merchant, 
Montreal, has returned from a success- 
ful fishing expedition in the Laurentian 
Mountains. 

II . \Y. Aird. oi t he ( lanada Paint Co., 
Mont ical, i- spending a three weeks' 
vacation with his fainih at Trout's 
Neck, .Maine. 

T. II Jordan, the managing director 
of A C. Leslie & Co.. Montreal, is 
spending a lew weeks' holidays at Old 
Orchard, Maine. 

J. N. Walker, a city traveler for 
Caverhill, Learmonl & Co., and one of 
the oldest travelers in Montreal, has 
gone west for a holiday. 

A. \V. Benedict, in charge of the sales 
department tor the Standard Paint Co., 
Montreal, is making an extended tour 
through the Maritime Frovinces- 




MR. GEO. CAVERHILL, Montreal. 

R. W. Leonard, of-'Coniagas Mines, 
Cobalt, spent a few days in Montreal 
last weels. He speaks hopefully of the 
strike situation and of future prospects 
of development. 

Amongst those who called in Montreal 
last week were: A. Femieux, Henry- 
ville; O. B. IF Maillc, Longueil; II. F. 
Crepin, Chateauquayy N. C. Poison', 
Kingston; Mr. Corriveau, St. Sebastien. 

The travelers for Starke, Seybold & 
Co., Montreal, were the guests of tiie 
company at the Corona Hotel, Thursday 
evening, July 25. William Starke was 
master of ceremonies and a very enjoj 
able evening was spent. 

K M treland, of Dalton & Sons, 
Kingston, was married recently, and 
parsed through .Montreal, looking up old 
friends, on his waj home from a trip 
down the Saguenay. Hardware and 
Metal .joins in wishing him a happy 
married life. 

Joseph Ridge, general manager of 
John Hound & Son. silversmiths, Shef- 
field. Eog., spent last week in Montreal 
at the Canadian offices and left on his 

42 



wav west through Canada, lie was ac- 
eoinpanied to Toronto by J. R, s. Mc 
Lemon; the Montreal manager. 

A. I). Leblanc, a representative of 
Lewis Bros., Montreal, for a number of 
years past, is severing Ins connection 
with that linn, and is going into busi- 
ness for himself. He will start up a 
sporting goods store in Montreal. J. 
A. Roche tte, of the sales department of 
Lewis Bros., will succeed him on the 
road. 

Western Canada. 

Trenholme Bros., of High Fiver, Alta. 
have sold their hardware business to 
Hallantyne Bros. 

G. E. Kingsbury, harness dealer, 
North Battleford, has assigned to W. IF 
Jarman. 

'flic Winnipeg Galvanizing & Mfg. Co. 
have bought the works of the Bed River 
Metal Co., of Winnipeg. Louis Sheldinnj 
is the manager of the new company. 

The hardware firm of Frame & Miller. 
Virden, Man., have sold out. The busi- 
ness is now being carried on by Miller 
Lros., who are carrying a full line of 
hardware and have already enlarged the 
premises to double their former size. 

The Moose Jaw Evening Times of 
July 26, says : R. J. Gay, represent- 
ing the Hardware and Metal Journal, 
one of the McLean publications, was in 
the city to-day collecting material for 
an article on conditions of the trade in 
Western Canada. Mr. Gay said that no- 
where along the line had he seen the 
crops looking better than in the Moose 
Jaw district. He is going through to 
the coast. 



A MAN OF PARTS. 

Last week George Caverhill, of Caver- 
hill, Learmont & Co., Montreal, was ap- 
pointed a director of the Montreal Street 
Railway. This is but another instance 
showing the demand for Mr. Caverhill as 
a director of corporations. His business 
capacity and influence are always called 
into requisition and they always prove 
their value. To show the powerful in- 
fluence Mr. Caverhill wields in commer- 
cial circles, it might be interesting to 
Is i low that he is president of the Mon- 
treal Board of Trade, vice-president of 
the Montreal Loan & Mortgage Co., a 
director of the Dominion Iron & Steel 
Co., chairman of the board of directors 
of the R. & 0. Navigation Co., a direc- 
tor of the Canadian Colored Cotton 
Mills Co., of the Royal Victoria Life In- 
surance Co., and a chairman of the Can- 
adian Foard of the London & Lancashire 
Fire Insurance Co. Mr. Caverhill is also 
a member of all the known clubs in 
Montreal. 



IMPROVED FILE. 

An invention by II. Gel a/.. Schenec- 
tady, X.Y., refers to that class of filesin 
which the teeth are composed of a series 
of cutting blades clamped together in 
an angular relation and adapted to be 
readily sharpened when dull. The ob- 
ject is to improve the files, especially in 
the matter of providing for the deflec- 
tion of the blades in an effective man- 
ner. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Markets and Correspondence 



(For detailed prices see Current Market Quotations, page 66.) 



MARKETS IN BRIEF. 



Montreal. 

Antimony — Weak. 
( 'upper — Weak. 
Iron — Firmer. 
Lead Firm. 

Linseed Oil- I leeline of 2 cents. 

Paris Green — Firm with heavy de- 
mand. 
Turpentine — Further decline of .'{ 

cents. 

Toronto. 

Linseed Oil — Decline of 2 cents. 
Copper — Decline of 1 cent. 
Old Material — Lower prices. 



MONTREAL HARDWARE MARKET. 

Montreal. August 2. — Considerable ac- 
tivity is noticeable in local circles. The 
fall trade is commencing to open up 
and in another week or so will be in 
full swing. More activity than is usual 
at this period of the year is now ex- 
perienced. Manufacturers are working 
at a greater pressure than is customary, 
not so much because their order books 
are all cleared up. but because they are 
sowewhat uneasy regarding the future. 
The rate at which they are producing 
material now would make it easy to ac- 
cumulate a stock which is not at all 
wished for this season. Jobbers are not 
quite as liberal in their orders and even 
now when the manufacturers of lines 
which have been scarce this last winter 
and spring, such as green wire cloth, 
screws, nuts, anfl bolts, are working 
hard, retailers have to wait for their 
supplies. The fact that the employes 
of thi' manufacturers and the jobbing 
houses arc so busy is striking evidence 
of the fact that trade is in a very 
healthy condition. Prices on lines are 
very firm with no immediate prospects 
of advances. Supplies are quite ade- 
quate to the demand and. freight condi- 
tions are in a more satisfactory con- 
dition. This fall, however, it is ex- 
pected there will be a shortage of shed 
room for heavy freight. 

Screws — Stocks are being gradually 
repleted. The manufacturers are getting 
under way and another month or so will 
be in a position to cope with the de- 
mand. Prices are firm and unchanged, 
the recent advances being well maintain- 
ed. 

Building Paper — An unusually large 
amount of building operations is being 
carried through this year, and the de- 
mand for all lines of building paper is 
strong. The manufacturers are busy, 
and supplies are coming in promptly. 
Tarred felt is still quoted at 2.25 per 
100 pounds. 

Green Wire Cloth — The situation is 
unchanged. Prices are well maintained, 
but stocks are still short. Now that the 
demand has somewhat diminished the 



factories will be given a chance to catch 
up. 

Fire Brick- The tall season will soon 

open again and it is expected a big 
business will be done. Lasl Beason made 

a splendid showing in the amount of 

business transacted. 

Cement- Prices are firm and unchang- 
ed and a strong demand exists owing to 
the increased call for this in arehitec 

t lire. 

.Mechanics' Tools- The demand for 
all lilies has been well maintained 
throughout the summer season. Prices 

are unchanged. 

Builders' Hardware— This season will 
probably be a record-breaker in the 

amount of business done in all lines of 
builders' material. This business has 
been the chief feature of the hardware 

trade this year, especially in metropol- 
itan districts. 

Sporting Goods -Now is the time for 

dealers in these g Is to get in their 

supplies and be in perfect readiness for 
this fall's business which undoubtedly 
will be a bumper season. Guns and am- 
munition, and hockey and curling sup- 
plies should be well looked after. 

The travelers for the various jobbing 
houses have been in the warehouses and 
are again on the road, and fall business 
will in a few days be in full swing. 



TORONTO HARDWARE MARKETS 

Toronto, Aug. 2. — There is very little 
activity in the local hardware markets 
this week and evidently the usual mid- 
summer calm has settled upon the trade. 
However, jobbers do not figure on being 
busy at this time of the year and they 
are quite satisfied with the more or less 
steady stream of sorting orders which, 
even in this quiet time, continues to 
How to the large jobbing houses here 
from all parts of the porvince. Though 
the weather was very backward during 
the earlier portion of the season, and 
trade was retarded as a consequence, 
this fact simply served to prolong busi- 
ness farther ineo the summer months; 
the early trade was not lost, but simply 
distributed over a wider period of time. 
Now that local jobbers have reviewed 
their season's business, they invariably 
report that the aggregate business of this 
season has broken, all records. 

Screws — The demand for these, as for 
most hardware commodities, has fallen 
oil' considerably during the lasl two 
weeks, consequently the manufacturers 
have had an oporl unity to at least par- 
tially catch up with the trade. Consid- 
ering how far the makers were behind a 
few weeks ago they have done good work 
in repleting their stocks and supplies are 
now much better. 

Nails, etc. — Supplies of these are once 
more well up with the trade, though the 
best selling sizes continue in strong de- 
mand. Supplies of wire are also much 



unproved, principally owing to the tact 

that the demand has Blackened oil' ami 
the factories are pushing the manufac- 
ture to be ready for the fall trade, which 

usually commences about September. 
Green Wire Cloth So tar as jobbers 

are concerned, 1 1 m for- tins i-- 

over and some local houses did not even 
get one-third of the amount the. 

quired. Fortunately the season ha 
been a had one for flies, so that retail- 
ers and consumers have not been hall' as 

much inconvenienced by the lack of this 
article as they surely would have been 

had the spring been hot. 

Builders' Hardware This has been a 
record-breaking year for the sal 

builders' hardware ami mechanics' tools. 

Even now when the hardware trad, is 
quiet, a strong demand prevails tor this 
class of goods, and the unparallelled 

amount of building being done all over 

the country will cause an equally st ion- 
demand all through the fall months. 

Sporting Goods — Baseball, lacrosse and 
football requisites have had a large sale 

this year, ami a good average business 

is still being done in these goods. Fish 

ing tackle continues to be the strongest 
seller, however, though the trade in tour- 
ists' supplies and general summer resorl 
goods is very satisfactory. It is notice- 
able that each year steel fishing rods are 
coming more and more into popular fa- 
vor among sportsmen. 

Class-Trade is quiet in window glass 

at present and prices remain unchanged. 

Plate glass, however, has taken a Blight 
rise iii price ..win- to an advance in the 
European market: it is now quoted at 

:;n per cent, off list. 

Binder- Twine- Trade has greatly im- 
proved during the last two weeks and 
jobbers are greatly (dated at the pros- 
pects of a far better season than they 
expected. Car shipments have reached 
their destinations and a good business in 
repeal orders is being done. 



MONTREAL METAL MARKETS. 

Montreal, August 2.— Local market 
conditions arc somewhat improved. The 
dullness characteristic of the summer 
months was of short duration this year. 
The mills have opened up earlier this 
veai than formerly. A food tonnage is 
moving, the cargoes which arrived ten 
days or a fortnight ago being readily 
dist ributed 

Much uncertainty has ruled in the 
American market owing- to the unsettled 
condition of prices on many lines. On 
some lines, however, orders are well 
hooked up with the American mills. 
prices are firm, and a large tonnage is 
contracted for ahead. For the past five 
weeks there lias been absolutely no 
mand for material in the United States 

The English market is still subjei 
wide fluctuations. The chief factor in 
causing this lack of stability is specu 
latum. Merchants in America have been 
receiving continually such contradictory 



43 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



I conditions as are supposed to 
rule in England that now the find it 
more satisfactory to ignore them. This 
able condition has main- 
tained itself for such a period of time 
night assume serious propor- 
tions. Copper is firm one da] and the 
next dav tails flat. So with iron. 

Heavy inquiries for fall stocks are 
commencing to arrive in the local mar- 
ket, and it will not be long before the 
fall trade is in full swing. 

l'ig Iron. — There has been a little 

enquiry for iron in the United 

Stat ted probably by the oncer 

tain conditions existing at Lake Su- 
perior. The dullness which has been 
ing in the local market has ceased 
ami orders for fall stocks are arriving 
in increased numbers. Scotch iron is 
plentiful. Prices are firm and unchanged. 
Middlesboro No. 1, $21.50; No. 2, 
$20.50; Summerlee, $25.50. 

Ingot Copper.— Is weak, corresponding 

imerican and foreign conditions. In 

some cases, however, even in I nited 

States a strengthening is noticeable. 

How long this firmness will last is hard 

ate. Prices are unchanged and easy. 

Ingot Tin.— No further lessening has 
been made in premiums offered for early 
delivery and conditions are easier. Ijp 
to last week business in the United 
States was good, but since then a gen- 
eral dullness has reigned. Lamb and 
Flag, and Straits, are quoted at $44. 

Antimony. — The market is much 
easier. Not much demand exists. Cook- 
son s is still quoted at 18c. 

Sheet Zinc. — Is quiet. Prices are un- 
changed. 

Zinc Spelter. — The situation is un- 
changed. The tendency in the American 
market is downward. Domestic is quoted 
at $6.50. 

Old Materials. — Very little is doing in 
the local market. It will not be long 
before business is enlivened. It will be 
interesting to note that the mines have 
set the price of copper this year at or 
about 22 cents, a cent, or two lower 
than last year's price. Prices are weak. 
No change is made this week. Machinery 
cast scrap, $17; heavy red brass, $15.50; 
heavy copper, $17. 

Lead. — The demand is steady. Pig 
lead is still quoted at $5.45. 



TORONTO METAL MARKETS. 

Toronto, Aug. 2— There is little doing 
in metals on the local market, a season- 
able dullness having settled upon the 
trade. Jobbers are quite elated over 
the record-breaking amount of business 
that has been transacted this year, ,u. : 
are confidently looking forward to a 
heavy autumn business as soon as trade 
revives again, which it no doubt will 
before the end of the present month. 
Meanwhile, few trqnsactions of any 
magnitude are reported, but a fair 
amount of orders continue to arrive for 
the various metals in sorting quanti- 
ties. 

Antimony— Since the decline of last 
week there has been no change in local 
quotations, the price remaining easy at 
the reduced figures. The American mar- 
ket shows no encouraging features, sel- 
lers are again urging for orders, and the 
market is weaker on spot and futures 
with nothing doing. In spite of the un- 
usually heavy shipments of antimony 
ore and metal from the foreign ports to 
the United States, the European market 



has continued to shade prices and this 
uncertainty has practicallj demoralized 
the American market. During the past 
Sve months the market has been dull, 
but indications seem to favor an im- 
provement in the consumption of anti- 
mony regains, and naturally the execu- 
tion of new orders should stimulate the 
market. While a lew still look for fur- 
ther reductions in prices, on the other 
hand there is good reason to believe 
that the American dealers would raise 
their prices if the European market 
would assume a stronger tone. 

Pig Iron— The market continues ex- 
tremely dull locally, with practically 
not lung doing. 

Tin— The market is quiet and very lew 
enquiries are coming in. Prices remain 
steady as last quoted. 

Lead — The price is fairly steady local- 
ly, considering the fact that both the 
British and American markets are at 
present very weak. 

Copper— The local price has declined 
one cent, and casting ingot is now quot- 
ed here at 22c. The London market is 
rather quiet at present, and as for the 
American market, the copper situation 
is dull, and there is litele buying in evi- 
dence. However, it would seem that 
stocks in the hands of consumers are 
pretty low, and developments in the 
buying line in the near future would not 
be surprising. There has been a de- 
crease in copper production since the 
lirst of the year, and it would not be 
surprising in the least, if the output of 
the country's mines in f 007 fell below 
the production in 190fi. For this reason 
many dealers across the line do not ex- 
pect a further cut from the present 
figures. 

Old Materials — Prices continue to 
drop, and the local market is exceeding- 
ly quiet. It is not expected that busi- 
ness will pick up to any extent for two 
or three weeks yet. Heavy copper and 
wire has dropped three cents and is now 
quoted at 15c. Light copper and heavy- 
red brass have each taken a further de- 
cline of one cent and the price of both 
is now 14c; heavy yellow brass has al- 
so dropped one cent, and is now quoted 
at lie; tea lead and scrap zinc have 
both declined ^c. during the week and 
both are now quoted at 3^c 



LONDON METAL MARKETS. 

London, July 30— Cleveland warrants 
are quoted at" 57s. 4kl., and Glasgow 
standards at 5fis. 4d., making prices as 
compared with last week, on Cleveland 
warrants, Is. lid. lower, and on Glas- 
gow standards, Is. 5d. lower. 

Tin— Spot tin opened firm at £182, 
futures at £180 15s., and after sales of 
250 tons spot and 450 tons futures, 
closed easy at £181 15s. for spot and 
£18o 10s. for futures, making price as 
compared with last week £2 5s. lower 
on spol, and £1 lower on futures. 

Copper — Spot copper opened weak at 
£88 15s., futures at £84, and after sales 
of 300 tons spot and 900 tons futures, 
closed firm at £89 for spot and £81 15s 
for futures, making price as compared 
with last week £1 10s. lower on spot. 
and £2 10s. lower on futures. 

Spelter— The market closed at £23 5s., 
making price as compared with last 
week, 12s. 6d. lower. 

Lead— The market closed at £19 7s. 
fi<l.. making price as compared with last 
week, £1 7s. 6d. lower. 

44 



U.S. METAL MARKETS. 

I ileveland, O.. An- 1. The iron Trade 
K'.\ irw to-day says: 

There is a marked increase in inquiry 
for pig iron in eastern markets, and a 
buying movement of some proportions 
has been started in New York, but in 
the central west the pig iron markets 
are listless, although prices show little 
change. It is understood thai the Cor- 
poration is willing to take from L0.000 
to 15,000 ions of Bessemer pig iron al 
$22 valley furnace. There is a scarcity 
of Bessemer, bul an ample supply of 
basic is obtainable. 

Although the buying- of steel rails is 
not general, contracts for 50.000 Ions 
have been placed in Chicago. Railroads 
are showing more of a tendency to buy, 
and the market in track material is 
stronger, especially in spikes and bolls. 

Lower prices for scrap are having 
effect on bar iron, and the quotation of 
1.60o Pittsburg has been shaded. The 
present tendency is toward firmness. 
One concern, which has been well known 
for ils tendency to name low prices for 
bar iron, has been placed in t'.'.e hands 
of a teeeiver. 



U.S. IRON AND METAL MARKETS. 

New York, Aug. 1 — The Iron Age to- 
day says : '• The real test of the situ- 
ation at the ore mines and at the ship- 
ping docks will come as soon as the 
Oliver Iron Mining Co. starts resumption 
seriously. This is expected at a very 
early date. The attitude of the local 
authorities and of the residents in the 
mining regions has been strongly ad- 
verse to the strikers, and the convic- 
tion has been growing that the trouble 
will soon be ended. 

The strike has had little effect upon 
the markets, it being generally under- 
stood that it does not influence the ear- 
ly supply. 

The Steel Corporation has bought 11,- 
000 tons of Bessemer pig, practically all 
of the floating supply in the Pittsburgh 
district, for August delivery, but has 
not purchased any iron in the eastern 
markets. 

On the whole, deliveries of pig iron 
are very well taken, thus indicating tlut 
current consumption is still very heavy. 
It is only rarely that complaint is 
heard by inciters that they are getting 
too much pig iron and fear an embargo. 

There is a good deal of delay in put- 
ting through contracts for structural 
material, many of which have been pend- 
ing for a considerable time. This is ap- 
parently due to jockeying for lower 
prices, since concessions are being free- 
ly made bv fabricators on erected work. 

The rail trade is very quiet, the only 
large transaction being reported from 
Chicago, where a new traction system 
has bought 25,000 tons, after negotia- 
tions protracted through efforts to fi- 
nance the new road 

The leading metals continue to show 
weakness. In small quantities electro- 
lytic copper has sold at 20c. to-day. 
No details as to reported transactions 
on a very lame scale can be obtained. 
Spelter is weaker, and a further redue 
tion in the price of lead by the Ameri 
can Smelting & Refining Oo. is regard- 
ed as imminent. 



II A R I) W \ R E A N I) M ET \ I- 




Travelers, hardware merchants and 
clerks are requested to forward corres- 
pondence regarding the doings of the 
trade and the industrial gossip of their 
town and district. Addressed envelopes, 
stationery, etc.. will be supplied to regu- 
lar correspondents on request. Write 
the Editor for Information. 



HALIFAX HAPPENINGS. 

Halifax, .July 29 — 'Mid-summer dullness 
in the hardware trade is now on, and 
there is very little business moving. 
Prices throughout the list are prettj 
steady. There was a fairly good de- 
mand for haying tools this season, but 
the rush is now over. The trade in 
builders' supplies has been exceptionally 
good, and the sales of glass, paints and 
oils, have been quite heavy. The new 
price lists have not yet cqtrae to hand. 

* * 

* 

Thomas R. (iue, president of the 
Acadia Powder Co., and president of 
the Dominion Electrical Co., died in 
this city on Sunday. He was one of the 
wealthiest citizens of Halifax, and prac- 
tically owned both of the above com- 
panies. He was born in New York in 
1843, but came to Canada thirty years 
ago, and was for some lime secretary 
of the Hamilton Powder Oo., of Mon- 
treal. He established the Acadia Pow- 
der Co., which plant at Waverly, N.S., 
is one of the largest of the kind in Cana- 
da The plant of the Dominion Electri- 
eal Works, of which he was the head, is 
near Windsor Junction, and the business 
lias grown rapidly of late. This com- 
pany manufactures electrical appliances 
for mining. The late Mr. Gue was con- 
sidered an expert authority on mining 
matters. 

* * 

The Dominion Iron & Steel Co. has 
been awarded a contract for 13,000 tons 
of steel rails for the National Transcon- 
tinental Railwav. The contract price 
is said to be $1,353,000. The first half 
of the order is to be delivered in Novem- 
ber of this year, and the remainder in 
1008. The company's output from the 
rail mill is said to be the principal as- 
set, and with the orders already on 
hand, the additional one .just received 
insures a profitable period for a consi- 
derable time to come. 



The Board of Trade, of Amherst, has 
appointed a strong committee with 11. 
.1 Logan, M.P., chairman, and A. P. 
Athcrton, secretary, to carry out ap- 
propriate connection with the opening 
of the Chignecto Power Plant, on the 
31st inst. 



The City Board of Works has decided 
to ask for tenders for three thousand 
water meters, four hundred of lead 
water pipe, and a supply of valves. The 
meters will be installed in the houses in 
the city as soon after the tenders are 
accepted as possible. 

Alexander McDougall, superintendent 
of the Boston Woven Hose and Rubber 
Co., of Cambridge. Mass., spent several 
days in the city last week. 



Mr. Donl) , I commi 

in Mexico, hit last week for 

Western I i ada I [e \\ ill v in the pi in 

cipal cities en route. 



Charles Margraves, manage] ol the 
Spring-lull Collcries, accompanied by his 
w it i- and daughter, have left on a two 
months tour of Europe. 



I.. .1. Fader, chief engineer of the 

Halifax Cold Storage Co.. left to-da\ 
I'm Tort. Ilawkesbui \ , where he will 
Superintend the erection of a cold stoi 
age plant. 



At a recent meeting of thei Water and 
Light Committee, of Moncton, the ten 
del- of fcKe Canada Iron & Found] j I '" 
of Londonderry, VS., for watei pipe 
was accepted. The lenders were : I'. 
I). Wood & Co., $13,935.00 : I) .1 
Stewart & Co., $12,776.25 ; Singleton, 
Dunn & Co . $12,384.00 ; Canadian Iron 
& Foundry Co., $12,592.50 ; Summer a 
Co., $12,894.00. 

* • 
* 

A telegram was received in Halifax 
last week from Winnipeg announcing 
that Prof. E. Brydon-.Jack had been ap- 
pointed to the chair of civil engineering 
in the University of Manitoba, it is 
understood that Mr. Brydon-Jack his 
wired his acceptance of the position, 
and that his resignation has been ten- 
dered to the board of governors of Dal- 
housie College, in which institution he, 
has for two years been in charge of the 
department of civil engineering. 



SCENIC ST. JOHN. 

St. John, N.B., July 2. — The hardware 
business in most lines is rather dull at 
present. The trade in builders' materia! 
however, continues brisk. 

It is stated that a local company, with 
a large capitalization, has been formed 
with the intention of manufacturing a 
patented dress skirt fastener, and that 
the property now being used by the 
Mowry Lock Nut Company, Avhich is to 
remove to Sydney, shortly, has been pur- 
chased, for carrying' on the industry. 
Thos. A. Linton, of Linton & Sinclair, is 
said to be the principal stockholder. Mr. 
Linton, however, was not ready to dis- 
cuss the plans of the new company. 

In a fire on Mill street on Friday last 
ten families were burned out; part of 
the stock of John MeGoldrick, junk and 
metal dealer, was destroyed : three 
stores, occupied by N. S. Springer for 
his grocery and feed business, were dam- 
aged considerably, and slight damage 
done to E. J. Carpenter's meat store. 
The loss was +10.000. and is partly cov- 
ered by insurance. 

Keith & Plummer and Horace R. Nix- 
on, whose general stores were destroyed 
in the Hartland fire, have decided to re- 
build at once. Ziba Orser has bought 
out the building and stock of T. J. Hur- 
ley, and has taken possession of the 
store. He will fit it up especially for 
the hardware trade. A new building is 
being erected for the Hartland monu- 
ment works. No new evidence leading 
to the solution of the fire mystery is 

45 



forth but the matter will be thor 

led. 

I.'.- operations in the Si. John river 
have amounted to more than 35,000,000 
Peel during the season, which has now 
been practically brought to a oiose, mak- 
ing it the best which lumbermen have 
Ol in many years. 

II. II. Dryden, Sussex, has secured 
property from (J. W. Fowler, ALP., on 
Courl street, Sussex, and will at once 
mence the erection of a large tin- 
ware factory. The factory will be serv- 
ed by a railway siding and ils location 
is one of the linesl manufacturing sites 
in the town. 

.Matthew Lodge, of Moncton, return- 
ed home 1.1,1 week from a visit to Eng- 
land. Mr. Lodge i- secretary of tin- 
New Brunswick Petroleum Company and 
his visit to the Old Country was to in- 
terest capitalists in the enterprise with 
a view to developing the Westmoreland 
oil fields. It is understood that the visit 
was very successful and that quite ex- 
Lensive operations will soon be under- 
taken. 

Mr. Lodge was accompanied by J. Mc- 
Laren Henderson and J. A. Henderson, 
of London, who are representing Eng- 
lish interests. V. W. Summer, president 
of the company; 0. P. Boggs, of Pitts- 
burg, and the Englishmen visited tin- 
oil wells at Memramcook a few days ago. 
Jl is understood that Mr. Boggs, who was 
at the wells last year looking over the 
proposition, has been engaged by the 
company to manage the work of de- 
velopment. 

John E. Moore, W. II. Barnaby and 
Col. II. II. McLean returned Saturday 
from Ottawa, where they interviewed 
Sir Wilfrid Laurier in regard to west 
side dredging. Mr. Moore reported that 
the dredging matter will be gone into by 
the premier when ministers absent from 
Ottawa ret urn to the capital this week. 

The wharf building work on the west 
side is progressing favorably. Clark & 
Adams, contractors for (he new wharf, 
have two cribs of 200 feet in length 
built to a height of 20 feet, and the oth- 
er two cribs well under way. One crib 
was moved into deeper water on Friday. 
Tin- building of the warehouse on thef). 
C. Clark wharf will be commenced this 
week. Several large gangs of men are 
engaged by the city in rebuilding Union 
street, which fell away on account of 
the dregding operations. C.P.R.. ami 
streel railway gangs are engaged in lay- 
ing tracks, and the west side presents a 
busy scene at present. 



KINGSTON KINETOSCOPE. 

Kingston. July 29.— The local hard- 
waremen here report business as being 
exceptionally brisk in all lines at pre- 
sent. So much building going on seems 
to be the cause of this and from all ap- 
pearances it is likely to continue this 
way for quite a while, as a large num- 
ber of building permits are being taken 
out and the buildings under way arc 
being rushed to completion; many are 
the plumbers and tinsmiths who are 
workinsr overtime owing to the rush in 
this line of business. The painters and 






HARDWARE AND METAL 



carpenters arc also very busy still, as a 
result of the late spring we had, along 
with the numerous new buildings which 
are being erected. There lias been a great 
demand for all lines of sporting goods 
as we have had very line weather the 
past month and a large number are 
taking their summer vacation. This, 
with the various Sunday School and 
private picnics which are being held, adds 
considerably to the sporting trade. 



Contracts have been awarded for im- 
provements to St. George's Hall and 
{pi the building of a sexton's residence 
to the following: Masonry, Henry W. 
Watts: carpentering, W, J. Chapman; 
heating and lighting, Taylor & Hamil- 
ton; painting, etc., T. McMahon & Co. 
The work is to be completed by Octo- 
ber. 

• * 
* 

The main corridors and stairways of 
the city buildings are now going under 
needed repairs and are at ldast assum- 
ing a respectable look. The walls are 
being painted green, while the woodwork 
is to be grained an oak hue. It will be 
a fortnight before the painters are 

through. 

* • 
* 

A meeting of the creditors of George 
Sears, hardware merchant of this city, 
who recently made an assignment, was 
held on Thursday afternoon. J. B. Walk- 
em was appointed assignee and A. J. 
Maedonnell. J. McDonald Mo watt and 
\V. B. Dalton were named inspectors. 
The meeting was adjourned till .Inly 
30th. If Mr. Sears is able to arrange 
certain matters, the claims may be paid 
in full, otherwise about fifty cents on 
the dollar will be the result. 



A happy time was held on Wednesday 
evening, when the employes of Mckclvcy 
i5c Birch's celebrated the re-opening of 
the new building, erected in the place of 
the one recently destroyed by fire. About 
fifty of their friends gathered to take 
part in the house-warming, which 
proved to be one of the best and most 
enjoyable parties of the season. The fine 
polished hardwood floor downstairs fur- 
nished ample space for the dancers, who 
tripped about to the strains of suitable 
music from Watson & Salisbury's or- 
chestra. Upstairs, those who preferred 
cards, found tables daintily arranged 
for their accommodation. During the 
evening refreshments were served and it 
was early in the morning before the 
merry-makers -\Ker.e able to tear them- 
selves away from the happy scene. The 
store is about completed, there being 
just some of the finishing-up jobs being 
done now and the electricians are still 
at work, but they expect to get moved 
into their new apartments in the course 
of a week and will have one of the finest 
fitted up stores for miles around. 



Work on the new cement platform at 
the Kingston and Pembroke railway sta- 
tion here, commenced several weeks ago, 
was concluded this week. The work was 
done by Mr. Holder, contractor, of this 
city. The new platform and steps gives 
the station a splendid appearance. Con- 
crete cement is becoming a very favor- 
ite material here for the construction of 
buildings and residences. H. G. Arm- 
strong has opened a new store on Mont- 



real Street, built of concrete blocks, 
which lie is manufacturing in his new 
building. He also handles farm imple- 
ments and has now space enough to 
show them to good advantage. 



Another fine brick building is rapidly 
rising into space on the corner of John 
son and Bagot Streets for P. S. Ala 
hood, merchant, of this city. The con 
tracts for this were awarded as follows: 
lia onry, Free & Slorley; carpentering, 
Hunter & Harold: plumbing and heat- 
ing, Simmons Bros.; painting, llobinson 
Bros. G. It. Thomlinson lias the con- 
tract for electric wiring and fittings. 
Mr, Mahood expects to be able to move 
into his new residence in the fall. 



The largest shipment of binder twine 
ever sent out from any factory in On- 
tario was loaded here recently to be 
taken westward, the consignment con- 
sisted of eight carloads, the output of 
the Kingston Penitentiary plant. It was 
being forwarded to Alberta. A few days 
later nine carloads were sent to the 
same destination, making the enviable 
record of seventeen carloads in one week. 
The twine goes to the Farmers' Asso- 
ciation in Alberta. Last year the asso- 
ciation tried samples and were so well 
pleased that this year they filled their 
entire needs from the prison. The prices 
paid were: 550-foot, mixed, ]0c per lb.; 
600-foot, mixed, lie; 600-foot, pure, 
.ll^c. The seventeen carloads were 
shipped on three steamers from this 
city. 

The Lake Ontario park power house, 
owned by the Kingston Street. Railway 
Co., was burned to the ground last 
week. The damage will inconvenience the 
company greatly, but will not interfere 
with the lighting of the park, as power- 
can be switched from the city current 
and Edison machine will be brought, in- 
to use. The cause of the blaze remains 
a mystery as it happened about four- 
o'clock in the morning. Bake Ontario 
Park is one of the cool spots visited by 
the people of this city, the street rail- 
way having charge of the grounds. 



BOOMING BELLEVILLE. 

Belleville, July 30— All conditions per- 
taining to the hardware, plumbing and 
steam-heating trade in this city were 
never in a more flourishing condition 
than at present. Such is the opinion 
expressed this week by the leading local 
dealers. Shops and factories are run- 
ning full blast with a full staff of work- 
men. Some places have even had to re- 
fuse big contracts owing to the Ink of 
help. 



The Belleville Hardware Co., of which 
Sir Mackenzie Bowell is president, find 
it difficult to keep up with orders. The 
firm makes a specialty of all kinds of 
locks, and they are gaining a great 
reputation for this class of goods \ 
great many expert mechanics are given 
employment at these works. A rreat 
many people in this city believe it was 
the starting of these works a few yens 
ago that has been mainly responsible for 
Belleville's prosperity in recent years. 
This company started in a very small 
way, and by strict attention to busi- 
ness, good management on the part of 



the officers and square dealing, it has 
now become one of the leading indus- 
tries of the city, and it is constantly 
growing. W. C. Springer is general 
manager, and Mr. H. C. Hunt, secre- 
tary. 



The Mac Machine Co., is another im- 
port ant industry which deserves special 
mention in your representative hardware 
journal. Under the able management of 
Harry Bennett, it has established a 
business known from one end of the 
country to the other. This firm makes 
a specialty of all kinds of mining machi- 
nery, and there is a demand for their 
goods even from far Alaska. Nearly 
every mine in this part of the country 
is installed with mining apparatus from 
the Mac Machine Co., whose mining 
drills have a splendid reputation. 



Marsh & Hawthorn's Foundry must 
not be over-looked, when one is speak- 
ing of Belleville's iron industries. This is 
one of the oldest foundries, having been 
established about 60 years ago by the 
late .lames Brown. For over half a 
century it was known far and wide as 
Brown's Foundry, from which hundreds 
of boilers and engines were sent forth, 
many of which are in existence and do- 
ing duty to-day. This firm makes a 
specialty of boilers and steam hoists, 
and every week bio - shipments are made 
throughout the country. Mr. Marsh, 
the manager, is about 38 years of age. 
and is one of the most popular residents 
of the city. 

The steel work on the new hotel 
Quinte has been completed, and reflects 
credit on the Hamilton Bridge Co., the 
contractors for the work. Mr. Mait- 
land Roy, and old Belleville boy, now 
engaged with the Hamilton Bridge Co., 
was here last week, and in company 
with the gas committee of the council 
put in plans and specifications for the 
new gas plant and also submitted ten- 
ders. 

* 

Mr. Bennen, representing Morrison's 
Brass Works, of Toronto, was a caller 
on the trade here this week. He thinks 
Belleville is a plumbing city, and pre- 
dicts for her a brilliant future. 



Over 350 men are now employed on 
the erection of the Lehigh Portland 
Cement Co.'s plant, which will be when 
completed, the largest of its kind in 
Canada. The main buildings are to be 
built entirely of steel and cement, over 
25,000 barrels of the latter being neces- 
sary. 



PETERBOROUGH PARAGRAPHS. 

Peterborough, July 30. — An agitation 
is on foot among the hardware mer- 
chants of Peterborough to close shop 
on Thursday afternoons during the 
months of July and August. Last sum- 
mer a movement was made in this di- 
rection but it did not materialize. The 
Thursday half holiday movement is 
gaining ground here and this summer 
practically all the dry goods stores, 
clothing establishments, jewelry shops, 
and several other lines of business close 
on Thursday afternoons during the sum- 
mer. Next year it is hoped that the 



46 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



hai'dwaremen will get into line and also 
have the half holiday. 
* 
The firm of F. J. R. MaePherson & 
Co., hardware merchants and dealers in 
electrical supplies, has been given the 
contract of making numerous improve- 
ments at the local customs house. 
Among other things, the electrical wir- 
ing is being overhauled and a more up- 
to-date system being installed. 

• * 
• 

With scarcely one exception, the hard- 
ware firms in Peterborough do not ad- 
vertise. This is somewhat remarkable in 
a progressive city like Peterborough, 
but a number of local men who are in 
the trade state that advertising is not 
necessary. "We are doing all the busi- 
ness we can handle now," said one of 
them, "so what is the use of advertis- 
ing." If this is true in connection with 
all the local hardware establishments, 
then they do not need to advertise, but 
if a dealer has the goods and wants to 
dispose of them more rapidly than he 
may be doing, judicious newspaper ad- 
vertising would no doubt accomplish his 
purpose. Peterborough has three live 
daily papers and advertising in them 
would no doubt pay. 

* * 
* 

Two local hardwaremen, Ernest M., 
and Ray P. Best, of the Best Stove 
Company, have recently obtained con- 
siderable repute as walkers. A short 
time ago they walked from Bests' sum- 
mer cottage at Chemong to Peter- 
borough, a distance of 6i miles, in one 
hour and seventeen minutes. 

Damage to the extent of $38,000 was 
done by fire to the mills of the Caven- 
dish Lumber Company at Lakefield on 
Saturday, July 27. A large amount of 
lumber was burned, but the loss is cov- 
ered by insurance. 

There is some talk of a company being 
organized in Peterborough to establish 
a plant and carry on the manufacture 
of bits and augurs. This city already 
has an industry engaged in the manu- 
facture of these goods, the Rapid Tool 
Company. This company has not yet 
been running a year, but it is getting 
along splendidly and is working over- 
time to keep up with orders. The goods 
turned out are said to be of superior 
quality and are finding a ready market. 



WIDE AWAKE WOODSTOCK. 

Woodstock, July 29. — Hardware men 
in Woodstock report that during the 
summer months, business has been quite 
up to the average. There have been a 
number of new buildings, private resi- 
dences and extensions to industrial 
establishments; the new Y.M.C.A., Car- 
negie Library, a new hotel, etc., are in 
process of construction, and these all 
furnish sales. " I have no reason to 
kick " is the prevailing tone of the 
dealers. 

* 

Quite an extensive business is done in 
this district, in the sale of wire fence. 
No more the old-time rail fences are go- 
ing up, and what remain are gradually 



being used as a tire w I. We know 

of a. number of farmers, who, each Bpring 
in their maple Bugar camps, barn up eord 
after conl of old rails, replacing the 
fences as they arc torn down bj modern 
wire fences. The barbarous barbed wire 
is just as much 4< out " ;is the rail fence, 

and not a small amount of it is being re- 
moved, and the wire buried deep in the 
earth, where it will never more be seen 
or heard of. The smooth u ire fence is 
undoubtedly the best kind made. There 
are two establishments in Woodstock, 
which annually turn out a good many 
miles of fence. Many farmers also have 
the apparatus for making their own wire 
fence, and weaving Hie stays. This is 
cheaper, and it is possible, they say, to 
construct just as good an article as they 
may purchase, already made. 

* • 
* 

Local dealers are this season observ- 
ing, during July and August, each Wed- 
nesday afternoon as a half holiday. No 
programs of amusement are arranged, 
but merchants and businessmen go out 
fishing or amuse themselves quietly in 

some way. 

* • 

Something was said last week about 
finding messages in packages of oranges, 
etc. I know of a man who found some- 
thing of more value than a mere address. 
He is a boot and shoe repairer in this 
city, L. E. Edwards, by name. One day 
a few months ago, when he was emptying 
out a package of small nails, he noticed 
in the pile a yellow glitter. He in- 
vestigated, and found a twenty-five cent 
gold piece. The date was an old one, 
and the piece is worth considerably more 
than the face value. How it got there 
is a mystery. Mr. Edwards couldn't 
find out. He has only one explanation. 
That is, that some person, probably 
when leaning over looking into a bin 
of nails, dropped the gold piece in, and 
then was unable to find it again. Since 
he made the discovery, he has carefullv 
watched all packages, but no such luck 
has come his way again. 



Where are the flies. So far this year, 
they have been conspicuous by their al- 
most entire absence. Doubtless hard- 
waremen appreciate their forbearance, 
but all the same, they notice a difference 
in the sael of screen windows and doors. 
"If there are no flies to keep out, what 
is the use of providing anything to 
keep them out" is the way people argue, 
and then they spend the money some- 
where else, and the hardwareman goes 
without that sale. However, as green 
wire cloth is abnormally scarce this year. 
it certainly is a godsend that flies are 
not as plentiful as usual. 

* 
Most men agree that a business may 
be carried on more satisfactorily on a 
cash basis than a credit. But the dif- 
ficulty is, to get them to put the prin- 
ciple into practice. They are afraid of 
offending some customer who has carried 
an account, perhaps for years, and al- 
ways pays up in the end. by insisting 
that he pay cash with every purchase. 

47 



They look on the dark side, and see 
their hnsiness gradually dwindling away, 
until ;il last the sheriff takes )>■ 

sum. if they looked on the brighl side. 

they would see a business system sim 
plitied by cash sales, no accuiinls to he 
sent out, no bad debts to weigh against 

the year's balance, no embarrat 

moments while refusing credit to a cus- 
tomer, tor all would be treated alike. 
They should recognize that a dealer 
Would be better off with a smaller busi- 
ness, and on a cash basis, than with a 
large business, and collections indefinite. 



INKLINGS FROM INGERSOLL. 

Ingersoll, July 31. — Few towns of 
similar size can boast of larger or bet- 
ter equipped industries than those ir, be 
found in Ingersoll. The citizens of this 
town :ne fully alive to the importance of 
manufactories, and the Board of Trade 
and the council are constantly on the 
alert to augment those already so well 
established whenever an oportunity pre- 
sents itself. The industry which pays 
its employes good wages and provides 
steady employment is an asset, the value 
of which it is difficult to determine. A 
sign of industrial expansion is to be seen 
in a large factory, on Thames St., which 
is just nearing completion and which 
will be occupied by Mitchell & Co., 
hearse builders. The new factory will 
give employment to more hands than 
are at present employed by the firm, 
and of course the merchants generally 
will be benefited to a larger extent. All 
the industries in the town are running 
to their full capacity and harmony 
reigns supreme between employes and 
employers. 

* 

"This has been* -the biggest year in 
the history of our store," said a hard- 
ware dealer to your correspondent to- 
day. Continuing, the dealer explained 
that the large increase in the volume 
of business was in a great measuer due 
to the prosperity which the farming 
community has enjoyed for the past 
six or seven years. While Canada as 
a whole has been unusually prosperous 
for the period mentioned, no class of 
people have been favored to a greater 
extent than the formers. As a result 
of the profitable seasons, which have 
come with such regularity, the farmers 
are now spending their money freely. 
Many are erecting large up-to-date barns 
while others are building handsome 
modern residences, which in many in- 
stances compare favorably with the fin- 
est to be found in towns and cities. This 
state of affairs, of course, indicates that 
the hardware dealers and the plumbers 
are reaping their harvest. The hard- 
ware merchants are a unit in stating that 
this has been a most busy season. Con- 
trary to expectations, a great deal of 
building has been going on in the town, 
while many citizens have greatly im- 
proved their premises with fresh coats 
of paint. It was feared earlier in the 
season that the increased cost of paint 
materials would interfere to a marked 
extent with trade, but people seem to 



II VRDWA R E \ X D M ET A L 



have made up their mind t" go on with 
the work, ami little or no difference can 
be noted. 

* 
The season is fast approaching when 
the hardware dealer will be giving at- 
tention to the Btove trade. This is a 
\.-i\ important part of the business, 
and one that is full of possibilities if 
properly handled. What applies to other 
retail business, applies with equal force 
to the hardware business, ami if it pays 
the grocer to make attractive displays, 
it should also benefit the stove dealer 
to do likewise. At least this is the 
argument of a local dealer who had "a 
most successful season" last year. When 

people are looking for a stove, they, as 

a rule, want a variety as well as does the 
lady who enters the dry goods stoic. 
eting and question-asking is a big 
part of purchasing nowadays, and if the 
dealer has the variety that holds the 
attention of the prospective purchaser, 
a sale is often made, largely on this ac- 
count. Opinions in regard to stows 
differe as well as in regard to other 
things, and it is well that the dealer 
should have a good assortment from 
which to choose. A large and attrac- 
tive display of stoves at the proper sea- 
son creates the impression that the 
dealer has anticipated a busy season, and 
soe how or other people like to patronize 
the busv store. 

* 
Not hint;- is heard here about the hard 
ware dealers cutting prices. They are 
all well established and apparently gel 
along with that friendliness which in- 
dicates that they have all they can do 
to attend to their own business withoui 
resorting to price-chopping. 



Although proclaimed as a "public 
holiday." Thursday was in reality In- 
gersoll's civic holiday. The feature of 
the day was an excursion to Port S:,m- 
ley which was largely attended. A rather 
peculiar state of affairs led to the day 
being proclaimed a "public holiday" in- 
stead of civic holiday. A petition s ib- 
mitted to the council requested that the 
day be observed as civic holiday, ami the 
request was granted. Some time prev- 
ious to this three lodges of the town had 
arranged to run an excursion oul of 
town, and August 1 was the day -el. 
A- soon as it was learned that civic 
holiday would come on this date it be- 
came known that the railway companies 
have entered into an agreement not to 
run excursions on a civic holiday, con- 
sequently complications arose at once. 
A little tact, however, saved the daj 

let both parties out. Mayor Coleridge 

had not yet issued his proclamation, and 
instead of proclaiming the day civic 
holiday, it was announced as a "public 
holiday" and the Grand Trunk promptly 
announced reduced fares, which gave 
the occasion the same effect as civic 
holiday. 

• 
II. Walter Knight, for the past seven 

- manager of the factory here of 
the St. Charles Condensing Co., has 



ed his connection with that firm. 
Knight's resignation came as a ureal 
surprise to the people of Lngersoll and 

the farmers of this district. ll is un- 
derstood that he has accepted the posi- 
tion of general manager id' a new con- 
cern. The Canadian Condensed Milk Co.. 
which, until a location for ils factor} 
has been decided upon, will have its 
headquarters in lngersoll. 



There are doubtless many readers of 
Hardware and Metal who are interested 
in educational mailers, who will also 
he interested in the action of the proper- 
ty committee of the public school at the 
last meeting of the hoard of education. 
In a report the committee recommended 
that the manual I raining and domestic 
science schools he discontinued and that 
I he services of a special singing and 
music teacher be dispensed with. They 
also suggested that to relieve the con- 
gested condition at the central school 
that the kindergarten be suspended for 
I lie fall term. Aflei much spirited dis- 
cussion the report was referred to the 
property and teachers-' committees and 
the action of the hoard is awaited with 
much interest bv all citizens. 



GO-AHEAD GALT. 

Gait, July 31. — There is more activity 
in hardware circles in Gait at the pres- 
ent time than there has been for some 
years. The activity is due mainly to 
the building operations under progress 
and also the brightening up the town is 
receiving in preparation for the old 
boys' reunion on August 7, 8 and 9. Mr. 
W. J. McMurtry, Main street hardware 
merchant, remarked to-day that he had 
sold more paint during the past few 
months than would otherwise have been 
disposed of in a year. The reunion will 
be a big event, and all old boys and 
their friends from the furthermost ends 
of the earth are cordially invited. 

The Gait Art Metal Company are ex- 
periencing a very busy season. They have 
completed the contracts awarded them 
for the four new Normal shools to be 
erected by the Government and are now 
busy on a number of other contracts. 
They have recently added a machine to 
l heir plant to be used in making steel 
lath. The machine was built, here at a 
cost of $10,000, including patents. A 
full description of the machine will ap- 
pear in the Call column shortly. 

The Clare Bros.' stove and furnace 
foundry in Preston is working overtime, 
and there is some talk of enlarging the 
premises on account of the rapidly in- 
creasing business. 

The first machine for the Canadian 
Brass Manufacturing Company was in- 
stalled last week. The building has been 
completed and it is expected that opera- 
tions will be commenced in earnest in 
about a month. 

The Down Draft Furnace Company 
intends putting a new line of stoves on 
the market, but as yet no information 
is available. 

4R 



The Maple Leaf Motor Company, 

which recently moved its plant from 
London to Gait, is making good in every 
sense of the word. The plant is being 
Worked overtime, and the prospects are 
that l he concern will grow to large pro- 
port ions. 

The Call Board of Trade has several 
new industries under consideration at 
present, but as the day of large bonus- 
ing is passing, it is doubtful if they will 
locate here. 

The Gait Brass Manufacturing Com- 
pany, composed of local men, is doing 
a large business. It is expected that the 
present quarters will be enlarged in the 
fall, or new quarters obtained. 



CHAT FROM CHATHAM. 

Chatham, July 30— For this season of 
the year trade has been exceptionally 
good. The majority of the seasonable 
lines are reported pretty nearly cleaned 
out. Notwithstanding the late start, 
the seasonable trade has been very good, 
much better, in fact, than the dealers 
anticipated. Plumbing and galvanized 
work, especially heating work, are 
i. it her brisk at present. 



Building operations have been slow 
this year. The high price of lumber and 
other materials is uncpuestionably to 
blame for this ; people who would other- 
wise have built say they simply can't 
afford to. Building this year has fallen 
far short of previous years, particular- 
ly 1905. But, notwithstanding this ten- 
dency, it is a noticeable fact that a 
great many householders are having 
baths put in, installing modern con- 
veniences and improved heating appara- 
tus. All of which goes to show that 
peopie are better off, and are giving 
more attention than hitherto to sani- 
tary improvements. 



C. A. Thomas, of the Sberwin-Wil- 
liam's Paint Co. was in the city this 
week, calling on the local agents, West- 
man Bros. 



Wallacebuig is beginning to discuss 
the waterworks question. The Messrs. 
Winters, surveyors and engineers, trrc 
engaged in surveying between the sugar 
factory and the ehenal ecartej with a 
view to locating the best route ii>jr 
bringing " Sny " water to the factory. 
Citizens are urging that the town join 
hands with the sugar company in bri.ig 
ing in the water and securing an ; p-to- 
date waterworks system. 



A charter has been granted by the 
Provincial Government, to the Blenheim 
& South Kent Telephone Co., Blenheim, 
capital, $10,000. The provisionbl direc- 
tors are : Geo. Taylor, merchant, Jas. 
Rutherford, miller ; Harry Drane, An 
drew Dcnholm and Chas. Henry Echlin, 
manufacturers, all of Blenheim ; Wilbcr 
James Huffman, farmer, and Neil Wat- 
son, manufacturer, both of Harwich, and 
Thomas Letson Pardo, of Raleigh. At 
the organization meeting held at Blen- 
heim last Friday afternoon, by-laws 
were adopted and the following officers 
elected : President, Br- C. B. Langford ; 
lice-president, Neil Watson, secretary- 



11 A R I) W A k 



A N D M ET \ L 



treasurer, Geo. Taylor; dure- Lois, 
Messrs. I'.icdo, Hluffman, Rutherford, 
Denholm and Dr. Hanks. The intention 
is to operate rural telephones through 
South Kent, preparations being already 
undci wav and franchises secured. 



Geo. Watt, o! Jas. Wall & Sons, was 
.1 roronto visitor last week. He has 
accepted a position with the Dominion 
Radiator Co. of that city, and will 
leave On Ufg. L5th to take up his new 
duties. 

Work on the O.W. cV" L.E. extension 
to Lake Erie is progressing rapidly, 
gsading being now complete to Cedar 
Springs. Last Thursday evening the 
first elect lie car crossed the Grand 
Trunk track, the city route along 
Raleigh street having been finished in 
a temporary fashion. The new car will 
he used in connection with the construc- 
tion w'ork. The laying, of 'the 'ties ;is 
progressing rapidly. The C.W. &, L.E. 
is, through the continuance of the in- 
junction procured by the Robertson, of 
Inches estate, prevented from building 
its permanent road on the western side 
of the highway ; but to overcome this 
difficulty, the city council on Monday 
evening granted the railway permission 
in 'ay temporary tracks in the centre 
of the street. 

* * * 

Tilbury merchants are discarding elec- 
tric lights and substituting natural gas. 
It is stated that I). W. Kett, proprietor 
of the electric lighting plant, intends 
entering action against the village for 
damages, claiming that his lighting 
franchise was exclusive and that the vil- 
lage' had no right to grant the gas fran- 
chise. The councillors express no un- 
easiness. 

* * 
* 

Word has been received that the Weber 
(Lis Engine Co., of Kansas City, intend 
sending a representative here 1o 'ook 
over the ground in reference to estab- 
lishing a plant in the .Maple City. 

* * 

Mayor Stone and Chairman Uislin, 
of the finance committee, last week in- 
structed City Solicitor Lewis to enter 
an appeal against the decision of Magis- 
trate Houston, in the Brody transient 
trader case. The magistrate, -it will be 
remembered, dismissed Hrody on the 
ground that a $100 license fee was pro- 
hibitive. The appeal has now been en- 
tered, and will come before the division- 
al court at Toronto some time in Sept 
The transient question was the theme 
of a rather warm tilt between Mayor 
Stone and Aid. Stephens at Monday 
night's council meeting, the latter ob- 
jecting to the action of the mayor in ap- 
pealing the case without lirst laying the 
matter before the council. The council, 
however, finally endorsed the mayor's 
action bv an almost unanimous vote. 



Word was received last week that the 
Canadian Wolverine Co. had been grant- 
ed a provincial charter. L. A., II. C. 
and C. W. Cornelius, of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., and Robert Gray and W. II. 
Westman, of Chatham, are named as 
provisional directors, the capital stock 
being $100,000, in 1,000 shares of $100 
each. It is expected that the Grand 
Rapids people will be here shortly to 
arrange for the organization meeting. 



The compan) ai e aul hoi ized to manu 
buy, sell and deal in plumbers' and 
waterworks' supplies, brass, metal and 

wooden goods and wale machinery and 
I oids ol all kinds This list aliords the 
concern a pretty wide scope foi ex pan 
sion. 

* * 
I 

An important business change look 
place to-day in I he well known In in ol 
James Watt <V Sons, plumbers and lit- 
ters of this city, the firm being dissolv 
ed by mutual consent. The business 
will be continued by .James and John 
B. Watt, Thomas Watt retiring from 

the partnership. 

* * 

J. W. Fleming & Sons, of Blenheim, 

had a large delivery of "Success " ma 
mire spreaders a week ago Saturda'j 
fifteen machines being taken home by 
purchasers from Raleigh, Harwich and' 
Tilbury. The firm had a parade of the 
" delivery " that afternoon, which at- 
tracted much attention. The delivery is 
believed to be the largest ever hckl in 
Blenheim. 

• 

An automobile garage is the latest 
for Chatham. WmT Haven and T. li. 
Tarsney, of Detroit, are in the city, and 
have announced their intention of open- 
ing an auto livery here. They will also 
go into the repairing business. Their 
location has not yet been decided upon, 
but they state that the concern will be 
inaugurated in the near future. 



LEAFY LONDON. 

London, Ont., July 31. — The second 
day's session of the Master House Paint- 
ers' and Decorators' Association open- 
ed with 150 delegates present. The fore- 
noon was taken up with the reading of 
papers dealing with various phases of 
the trade, followed by interesting dis- 
cussions. 

'"The Successful Master Painter of the 
Twentieth Century" was the first paper, 
which was read by Mr. Graves, of this 
city, in outlining the different qualifi- 
cations which were necessary to make a 
success as a painter, Mr. Graves fivsl 
called attention to the fact "that a man 
must be adapted to the trade," that is. 
lie must naturally have no fear of dizzy 
heights, as the business necessitated a 
great deal of work up in the air at dif- 
ferent heights, He must also hare a 
good understanding of different colors, 
so as to detect the slightest shade ; n 
lines, and above all, he must have a lik- 
ing for die trade n success wo i ; ' < v( i 
eome to him. 

The next paper read was "The Mas 
terter Painter in His Relations to the 
Architect," by J. TV. Knott, of Toronto. 
The speaker deplored the tact that the 
architects as a general rule were not ex- 
plicit enough in making specifications for 
painting, and this generally caused a 
great deal of annoyance and misunder- 
standing among the members of the 
trade. 

Different delegates spoke of misunder- 
standings they had experienced in this 
respect, and thought an attempt should 
be made to improve the con lit ions as 
thev existed. 



After a great deal of discussion a com- 
mittee was appointed t<> confer with the 
< lanaclian Societj of Architects vritfa a 

new I" ha\ lag -peeil'n-.il ions made 
plainer. 

E. .). [jinnington, of Toronto, followed 

with a paper mi "Pure Shellac." The 

liistorj of sheHae was dealt with. Its 

source, process of manu I'ael lire and uses 

were the more important points touched 
upon. The subject was dealt with in a 
\ei\ able manner, the delegates display 
in- intense interest throughout. A num- 
ber of formulas were given for making 
shellac varnish, which would be suitable 
for \erions kinds of work. 

In the afternoon the delegates enjoy- 
ed a pleasant time at Springbaiik | 

The mos| interesting discission of the 
convention took place os the (dosing day, 
Thursday, when (!. W. Freeman read H 
paper mi "Rest Means of Organiza- 
tion." At the outset he explained that 
he had been requested to formulate a 
plan for the best rneajis of or- 
ganizing a Canadian organization 
apart Prom the international association, 
lie thought that every loyal Canadian 
should be allowed to use his own discre- 
tion as to whether he should join the in- 
ternational or not. As the matter stands 
now every master painter is compelled 
to join the international as the Cana- 
dian association is merely a branch. He 
thought that if the proper measures were 
taken a Canadian organization could be 
formed which would be just as success- 
ful as the international. He did not al- 
together advocate secession from the in- 
ternational, but said that the matter of 
joining that association should be op- 
tional with every master painter in Can- 
ada. Although the international had 
been their protection and but for it they 
would not be here to-day. he predicted 
that the time was not far distant when 
the master painters of Canada would be 
an exclusively Canadian organization. 

The paper proved a startler to the 
delegates, none apparently being prepar- 
ed for such a radical proposition as made 
by Mr. Freeman. 

Mr. l'liinnemore, of Toronto, was first 
to express disagreement He thought to 
attempt the formation of a Canadian 
society at present would mean disorgan- 
ization throughout Canada. He advised 
considering the matter for some time and 
then perhaps Hie way might seem clear 
to secede from the international. 

President Brookes thought that if they 

wenl al it with a will a Canadian organ- 
ization could be formed. 

Others spoke on similar lines, some 
suggesting that il would be better to al- 
low matters to remain as they are while 
others thought it better to lay the mat- 
ter before the next convention. 

An interesting feature of the session 
was a practical demonstration by "W. E. 
Wall, of Somerville, Mass., of the art of 
graining in imitation of various woods. 

The following officers were elected for 
the ensuing term: President, H. R. Rey- 
nolds. Oitelph; vice-president. R. Booth. 
Loudon; secretary-treasurer, A. M. Mc- 
Kenzie. Hamilton; executive board. Ben- 
jamin Goodfellow, Gait: John Reede. To- 



49 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



; \Y. R. Talbot. Winnipeg; W. T. 
ft£oss< |>. London, and Win. Laessen, 
Winds 

The president, vice-president and sec- 
retar> -treasurer were appointed as dele- 
gates to the New Orleans convention next 
February. 

- wart X. Hughes, secretary-treasurer 
of the Canadian Association, has been 
elected president of the International As- 
sociation. Alter a vote of thanks and 
three cheers for the newly elected of- 
ficers the convention was dismissed. 



Mr. Donald, the Chicago man who is 
interested in the proposed new plough 
works for Chelsea Green, a southeast 
suburb of the city, has purchased from 
Col. Gartshore, of the McClary Co., two 
acres of land upon which to erect the 
works. The new industry will employ a 
large number of men, the great major- 
ity of whom will be skilled mechanics, 
and it will be a big addition to the south 
end's factories. Contracts have been let 
for the buildings, and it is understood 
that work will begin at once. 

• 
General quiet pervades the hardware 
trade. Travelers are all off on their holi- 
days. 

• 
Mention was made in this correspon- 
dence a few weeks ago of the fact that 
owing to pressure of business the Dennis 
Wire & Iron Co. were contemplating the 
erection of an addition to their present 
premises or building a new factory. This 
afternoon Ernest Dennis gave out some- 
thing definite in connection with the 
matter. The company, he says, has se- 
cured the property to the east of then- 
present works and will at once commence 
the erection of an addition 40x80 feet, 
and two storeys high, to be used chiefly 
by the steel stYuctural department. Some 
$13,000 will be spent on the building, 
and additional plant this year, which will 
enable the company to add 25 workmen 
to their staff 1 

• 
J. C. McConnell, advertising manager 
for the McClary Mfg. Co., leaves next 
week on a two weeks' trip to the Mari- 
time Provinces. 



SASKATOON SAYINGS. 

Saskatoon, July 26.— Several car- 
loads of brick and steel have arrived for 
the various buildings and are being un- 
loaded at the C.N.R. station. 



The elevator addition to the Sas- 
katoon flour mill is now completed. The 
whole building looks neat in its con: of 
red paint and is rendered fireproof by 
a covering of metal siding. 

* . ' 

S. A. Clark, one of the pioneer hard- 
waremen of Saskatoon, has disposed of 
his business. The new firm will take 
over the business on AugUSl 1 and will 
be known as the S. A. Clark, limited. 



J. F. Cairns is showing a neatly trim- 
med window df graniteware in various 
colors. To show the goods to belle. 1 ad- 
vantage Btepladdera are used and on 
these the smaller articles are displayed. 

The plumbing contract for the new 
Windsor Hotel lias been secured by M. 
1 >1 uster & Son. The same firm will also 
install a steam heating system both in 



the Windsor and in the new addition 
to the Royal Hotel. In both cases 
Florence steam boilers are specified, 
which will be supplied by the Pease- 
Waldoii Co., Winnipeg. 



W. P. Landon & Co., plumbers and 
metal workers are building an addition 
in the rear of their workshop in which 
a reserve stock will be kept. 



LEGALITY OF ESTABLISHED RESALE PRICES 

Paper read by George Puchta before the recent convention of the National Supply and 
Machinery Dealers' Association, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



We are all trying to do a legitimate, 
honest business, and to make it such we 
must have a fair prolit. How can that 
be done if goods are sold at cost or 
less ? The business man who knows 
what he is doing will not likely com- 
mence this practice. It is too danger- 
ous. It therefore follows that it must 
be instigated by the competitor who 
does not know, and which we will call 
unintelligent competition, and which 
causes most of the trouble and should 
be eradicated. 

Not in a radical manner, but by show- 
ing him the error of his ways and mak- 
ing him intelligent competition, and 
right here is where our associations can 
do much to improve conditions. How 
many have we in business that do not 
know the percentage of cost to do busi- 
ness, that keep no accurate accounts, 
but if they did, would surprise them- 
selves, and show them how much profit 
it is really necessary to have before 
they make anything. How many sales- 
men they have that are not producers. 
How often they permit salesmen to 
make prices on their goods, besides 
many others. 

Now this brings us to the present con- 
dition where we are selling some lines 
so low that we would be better off if we 
did not sell them at all, and as one of 
the remedies, the resale price is sug- 
gested where prices are demoralized, 
and is in operation in some lines with 
good results. The resale price is an 
agreement between the manufacturer 
and dealer whereby the manufacturer 
specifies a minimum price at which he 
will permit his make of goods to be 
sold by the dealer. 

Resale Prices on Rebate Plai. 

The resale price on the rebate plan is 
an agreement between the manufacturer 
and dealer whereby the manufacturer 
specifies a minimum price at which he 
will permit his goods to be sold by the 
dealer, and if the dealer has kept this 
agreement for an agreed period to the 
satisfaction of the manufacturer he re- 
ceives a rebate or commission, which in 
some cases is the dealer's entire profit. 

The resale price on the rebate plan has 
produced the best results. It is an in- 
dividual agreement between the manu- 
facturer and the dealer, and as long as 
it remains an individual agreement be- 
tween the two parties the legality of it 
is not questioned. When two or more 
manufacturers collectively, or two or 
more dealers collectively act, then the 
legality is questioned. 

When advised that I was expected to 
prepare a paper on this subject, I se- 
cured twelve pffcrent resale price agree- 

50 



ments in effect in various lines, and 
gave them to a reliable attorney for an 
opinion, and also prepared these ques- 
tions, and received the answers affixed : 

First. Do these agreements violate 
any laws ? Ans>- No. 

Second. Are these oontracts binding 
on the parties signing them ? Ans.— 
Yes. 

I also quote from this attorney's re- 
port the following : 

Important Legal Opinion. 

" If the articles manufactured are pro- 
tected by patents, the manufacturers 
have the right to make any terms, 
prices, conditions or restrictions they 
see fit. 

" The patent statute grants an ex- 
clusive monopoly which can not be cut 
down by the rule against restraint, for 
that would be to grant a monopoly by 
law and then proceed to take it away 
by law." 

If two or more manufacturers, who 
produce goods of similar class or char- 
acter, should combine either orally 01 
in writing, or by a secret understanding 
to put up prices limit output, or do 
other things against public policy or ob- 
noxious to the law, it would be in re- 
straint of trade to an extent that would 
be unreasonable and illegal. 

But if a single manufacturer of an un- 
patented article should make an agree- 
ment with his customers to Five them 
a rebate, commission or discount if they 
should refuse to sell his product at less 
than a certain price, it would not be in 
restraint of trade, as there would be 
nothing to prevent others engaging in 
the business, or the manufacturers of 
other articles from selling their pro- 
ducts to any one willing to buy. 

The attorney further states : "I have 
examined a large number of decisions 
and have used the language of the 
courts in the foregoing very largely.'-' 

Resale Agreement in Force. 

There are many resale price agree- 
ments in effect in many lines of trade 
with benefit to all concerned. 

First. The manufacturer in many 
cases has found that unrestrained com- 
petition means serious loss to him, be- 
cause the dealer, the selling end of the 
manufacturer could not make a profit, 
and he was thereby forced to sell his 
own goods direct as best he could 1 at a 
largely increased selling expense. 

Second. The dealer, who is conceded 
to be a necessity, cannot exist without 
a profit any more than the manufactur- 
er's salesman can exist without his 
salary ; consequently, when a line of 
goods becomes unprofitable, his exis- 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



tence demands a change to goods lh.it 
are profitable, or for'ces him to become 
a manufacturer, wine h In many cases is 

a detriment to both manufacturer and 

dealer. . . . 

Third. The cousin -icr is not. injured as 
long as fair profits are made, and he is 

protected againsti unreasonable charges, 
because when profits become unreason- 
able that in itself invites additional 
competition, Ifrhich is soon forthcoming 
and adjusts' the price. 

f.'roof Of Popularity. 
The resale price has been adopted in 
some lines that we as supply and machi- 
nery deal/crs handle with excellent re- 
sults, amp while it may not be advisable 
to adopt ^ m a H> it could be in lines 
that are< s °ld at little or no profit with 
much br-'netit to manufacturer and dealer 
alike, and should be encouraged. To 
show' its popularity, in a recent letter 
sen t., out by a manufacturer, asking the 
dealers what they thought of resale 
P rice agreements, and if they would sup- 
■ port same, answers were as follows : 

87.5 per cent, yes, with a few qualifi- 
cations. 

9.7 per cent. no. 

2.8 per cent, did not answer. 

But when a manufacturer arranges a 
resale price for his goods, it should be 
the solemn duty of the dealer to uphold 
that agreement to the letter and not in 
any manner violate same, and thereby 
-.make the profit the manufacturer is 
filling to allow him. The dealer must 
ha\' e the courage and honor to lose an 
ordeT rather than violate his agree- 
ments i 

Pa v ys to Uphold Agreement. 
What encouragement is it to a manufac- 
turer if he a 'lows the dealer, say, 15 per 
cent, differential, and the dealer in many 
wavs gives part' of it away, secretly Gr- 
ottier wise ? Everv time that it is done 
and discovered, and. it usually is dis- 
covered, it invariably ]?ads to a reduced 
differential, because the defers violation 
of the agreement is sufficient evidence 
to the manufacturer that the profit 
allowed is more than the dealer wants, 
and consequently it is reduced, and the 
dealer alone is responsible. 

I believe many manufacturers are will- 
ing to establish resale prices on their 
goods if the dealers will be fair, but 
fair play and a square deal are essential 
on the part of both manufacturer and 
dealer. Let us prove to the world that 
every member of these three associa- 
tions holds sacred any agreement he 
may make, and if this be done many of 
the goods sold to-day at little or no 
profit can be made profitable (there- 
by improving his condition as well 
as his competitor), and while the 
resale price will not cure all ail- 
ments and is not a cure-all, it can be 
effectively applied in many lines with 
benefit and profit to all and injury to 
none, and these associations here as- 
sembled can do much to bring same 
about. 



Files clogged with tin or lead will be 
cleaned by a few seconds in strong nitric 
acid. For iron filings use blue vitriol, 
rinse in water and dip in nitric. For 
copper or brass, use nitric several 
times; for zinc, dilute sulphuric acid. 
After any of these treatments rinse the 
files in water, brush vigorously and dry 
in sawdust or by burning alcohol on the 
file. 



Are 



Metal Ceilings 

An Experiment 

? 



Certainly not. The increased demand for this class of finish 
in all kinds of buildings, Old and New, is sufficient answer. 

"METALLIC" 

CEILINGS 

make satisfied customers. Some one else gets the trade if 
you don't. 

We will supply plans and quotations. Write us. 

" OUR DEALERS ARE PROTECTED." 



THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

Manufacturers Established 22 Years 

TORONTO AND WINNIPEG 



||OTw 



The John Morrow Screw, Limited 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONTARIO 



Shear making "up-to-date" is found in 

HEINISCH 

TAILORS' SHEARS, 
TRIMMERS, SCISSORS, 
TINNERS' SNIPS, ETC. 
"Best in the World" 

Since 1825, and a steady increase in sales 
due to their superior cutting quality. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 

NEWARK, N.J., U.S.A. 

New York Office and Salesroom, 155 Chambers St. 

51 




H A'R D W ARE \ \ D METAL 



MANITOBA HARDWARE AND METAL MARKETS 

Corrected by telegraph up to 12 ».m Kriday Aug 2 Room 511, Union Bank Hlilg, Winnipeg, Man. 

There are no changes of any account in prices this week, values continuing 

steady. A good average busii Lng transaoted for this time of the year. 

Buyers still continue to show a disposition to refrain from making Large pur 

chases until they can form some accurate idea concerning the amounl of this 

- western crop. 



ROPE— Sisal, lie. per tb., and pure 
manila, l5Jc. 

LANTERNS— Cold blast, per dozen, 
<7; coppered, $9; dash, $9. 

WIRE— Barbed wire, 100 lbs., $3.22J; 
plain galvanized, 6, 7 and 8, $3.70; No. 
9, $3.25; No. 10, $3.70; No. 11, $3.80; 
No. 12, $3.45; No. 13, $3.55; No. 14, 
$4; No. 15, $4.25; No. 16, $4.40; plain 
twist, $3.45; staples, $3.50; oiled an- 
nealed wire, 10. $2.90; 11, $2.96; 12, 
$3.04; 13, $3.14; 14, $3.24; 15, $3.39; 
annealed wires (unoiled), 10c. less; soft 
copper wire, base, 36c.; brass spring 
wire, base, 30c. 

POULTRY NETTING— The discount is 
now 47£ per cent, from list price, in- 
stead of 50 and 5 as formerly. 

HORSESHOES— Iron, No. to No. 1, 
$4.65; No. 2 and larger, $4.40; snow- 
shoes, No. to No. 1, $4.90; No. 2 and 
larger, $4.65; steel, No. to No. 1, $5; 
No. 2 and larger, $4.75. 

HORSENAILS— No. 10 and larger, 22c; 
No. 9, 24c; No. 8, 24c; No. 7, 26c; 
No. 6, 28c; No. 5, 30c; No. 4, 36c 
per lb. Discounts: "C" brand, 40, 10,10 
and H p.c; "M.R.M.'.' cold forged pro- 
cess, 50 and 5 p.c. Add 15c per box. 
Capewell brand, quotations on applica- 
tion. 

WIRE NAILS.— $3 f.o.b. Winnipeg, 
and $2.55 f.o.b. Fort William. 

CUT NAILS— Now $3.20 per keg. 

PRESSED SPffiES — i x 5 and 6, 
$1.75; 5-6 x 5, 6 and 7, $4.40; f x 6, 7 
and 8, $4.25; 7-16 x 7 and 9, $4.15; \ x 
8, 9, 10 and 12, $4.05; % x 10 and 12, 
$3.90. All other lengths 25c extra net. 

SCREWS — Flat head, iron, bright, 
85 and 10; round head, iron, 80; flat 
head, brass, 75 and 10; round head, 
brass, 70 and 10; coach, 70. 

NUTS AND BOLTS — Bolts, car- 
riage, | or smaller, 60 p.c; bolts, car- 
riage, 7-16 and up, 50; bolts, machine, 
% and under, 50 and 5; bolts, machine, 
7-16 and over, 50; bolts, tire, 65; bolt 
ends, 55; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 and ]&» 
machine screws, 70; plough holts, 55; 
square nuts, cases, 3 ; square nuts, small 
lots, 2\; hex nuts, cases,' 3; hex nuts, 
small lots, 2J p.c. Stove bolts, 70 and 
10 p.c. 

RIVETS — Iron, 60 and 10 p.c; cop., 
per, No. 7, 43c; No. 8, 42$c; No. 9, 
451c; copper, No. 10, 47c; copper, No. 
12, 50£c; assorted. No. 8, 44$c, and 
No. 10, 48c 

COIL CHAIN — a-in., $7.25; 5-16, 
$5.75; 25; 7-16; I 75; 0-16. 

1.65. 

SHOVELS— List has advanced $1 per 
dozen on all spades, shovels and scoops. 

HARVEST TOOLS— 60 an.1 5 p.c 

AXE HANDLER— Turned, s.g. hick- 
iov. doz., $3.15; No. 1, $1.90; No. 2, 
$1.60; octagon extra, $2.30; No. 1, $1.60. 



AXES — Bench axes, 40 ; broad axes, 
25 p.c. discount off list; Royal Oak, per 
doz., $6.25; Maple Leaf, $8.25; Model, 
$8.50; Black Prince, $7.25; Black Dia- 
mond, $9.25; Standard flint edge, $8.75; 
Copper King, $8.25; Columbian, $9.50; 
handled axes, North Star, $7.75; Black 
Prince, $9.25; Standard flint edge, 
$10.75; Copper King, $11 per dozen. 

CHURNS— 45 and 5; list as follows: 
No. 0, $9; No. 1, $9; No. 2, $10; No. 
3, $11; No. 4, $13; No. 5, $16. 

AUGER BITS— "Irwin" bits, 47i 
per cent., and other lines 70 per cent. 

BLOCKS— Steel blocks, 35; wood, 55. 

FITTINGS — Wrought couplings, 60 ; 
nipples, 65 and 10; T.'s and elbows, 10; 
malleable bushings, 50; malleable un- 
ions, 55 p.c 

HINGES— Light "T" and strap, 65. 

HOOKS — Brush hooks, heavy, per 
doz., $8.75; grass hooks, $1.70. 

STOVE PIPES— 6-in., per 100 feet 
length, $9; 7-in., $9.75. 

TINWARE, ETC.— Pressed, retinned, 
70 and 10; pressed, plain, 75 and 2\; 
pieced, 30; japanned wore, 37J; enamel- 
led ware, Famous, 50; Imperial, 50 and 
10; Imperial, one coat, 60; Premier, 50; 
Colonial, 50 and 10; Royal, 60; Vic- 
toria, 45; White, 45; Diamond, 50; 
Granite, 60 p.c. 

GALVANIZED WARE — Pails, 37i 
per cent. ; other galvanized lines, 30 per 
cent. 

CORDAGE — Rope sisal, 7-16 and 
larger, basis, $11.25; Manilla, 7-16 and 
larger, basis, $16.25; Lathyarn, $ll.? l j ) . 
cotton rope, per lb., 21c 

SOLDER— Quoted at 27c £ er pound. 
Block tin is quoted at 45^, p er p 0un( j 

WRINGERS-Royal. Canadian, $36 \ 
B.B., $40.75 per d/ ozen ; 

FILES— A.I cade, 75; Black Diamond, 
60; Nicho^on's, 62£ p.c. 

^ ;CKS — Peterboro and Gurney, 40 
per cent. 

BUILDING PAPER— Anchor, plain, 
66c; tarred, 69c; Victoria, plain, 71c; 
tarred, 84c ; No. 1 Cyclone, tarred, 84c ; 
No. 1 Cyclone, plain, 66c; No. 2 Joli- 
ette, tarred, 69c ; No. 2 Joliette plain, 
51c; No. 2 Sunrise, plain, 56c. 

AMMUNITION, ETC. — Cartridges, 
rim fire, 50 and 5; central fire, 33J p.c; 
military, 10 p.c. advance. Loaded shells: 
12 gauge, black, $16.50; chilled, 12 
gauge, $17.50; soft, 10 gauge, $19.50; 
chilled, 10 gauge, $20.50. Shot: ordin- 
ary, per 100 lbs., $7.75; chilled, $8.10. 
Powder: F.F., keg, Hamilton, $4.75; 
F.F.G., Dupont's, $5. 

REVOLVERS — The Iver Johnson 
revolvers have been advanced in price 
the basis for revolver with hammer be- 
ing $5.30 and for the hammerless $5.95. 



«! : j a Can of 




House j, 
Paint 

and go ahead and 
use it. 

We do not make 
or sell inferior 
Paints. / 

Sell them to y(5ur 
customer wi^ n t ne 
Stephen s ' Guar- 
antee; ' We stand 
"behind every bit 
of paint we send 
out. 

If you are in a 
hurry, we are 
always ready to 
ship as soon as 
we receive your 
order. 

G.F. Stephens & Co, 

Limited 
PAINT MAKERS 

WINNIPEG and CALGARY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



— The Best and Purest Shingle Preserver. 

Shingletint is for sale by all first-class dealers. 
—Shingletint looks well, wears well, and is easily applied. 

SAMPLE SHINGLES SENT ON APPLICATION 

Winnipeg Paint - Glass C 



CALGARY 



Limited 
IPEG 



IRON AND STEEL— Bar iron basis, 
$2.70. Swedish iron basis, $4.95; sleigh 
shoe steel, $2.75; spring steel, $3.25; 
machinery steel, $3.50; tool steel, Black 
Diamond, 100 lbs., $9.50; Jessop, $13. 

SHEET ZINC— $8.50 for cask lots, 
and $9 for broken lots. 

CORRUGATED IRON AND ROOF- 
ING, ETC.— Corrugate iron 28 gauge 
painted $3, galvanized $4.10; 26 gauge 
$3.35 and $4.35. Pressed standing 
seamed roofing 28 erauge painted $3.10. 
galvanized $4.20; 26 gauge $3.45 and 
$4.45. Crimped roofing 28 gauge paint- 
ed $3.20, galvanized, $4.30; 26 gauge 
$3.55 and $4.55. 

PIG LEAD— Average price is $6. 

COPPER— Planished copper, 44c. per 
lb.; plain, 39c. 



IRON PIPE AND FITTINGS— Black 
pipe, i-in., $2.65; |, $2.80; i, $3.50; J, 
$4.40; 1, $6.35; U, $8.65; 1$, $10.40; 
2, $13.85; 2i, $19; 3, $25. Galvanized 
iron pipe, f-in., $3.75; J, $4.35; i, $5.65; 
1, $8.10; U, $11; li, $13.25; 2-inch, 
$17.65. Nipples, 70 and 10 per cent.; 
unions, couplings, bushings and plugs, 
60 per cent. 

GALVANIZED IRON — Apollo, 16- 
gauge, $4.15 ; 18 and 20, $4.40 ; 22 and 
24, $4.65 ; 26, $4.65; 28, $4.50; 30 gauge 
or 10f-oz., $5.20 ; Queen's Head, 20 
$4.60,; 24 and 26, $4.90 ; 28, $5.15. 

LEAD PIPE— Market is firm at $7.80. 

TIN PLATES— IC charcoal, 20 x 28, 
box, $10; IX charcoal, 20 x 28, $12; 
XXI charcoal, 20 x 28, $14. 

TERNE PLATES— Quoted at $9.50. 



CANADA PLATES — 18 x 21, 18 x 
24, $3.50; 20 x 28, $3.80; full polished, 
$4.30. 

LUBRICATING OILS— 600W, cylin- 
ders, 80c; capital cylinders, 55c. and 
50c; solar red engine, 30c; Atlantic red 
engine, 29c ; heavy castor, 28c ; medium 
castor, 27c ; ready harvester, 28c ; stan- 
dard hand separator oil, 35c; standard 
gas engine oil, 35c per gallon. 

PETROLEUM AND GASOLENE — 
Silver Star, in bbls., per gal., 20c ; Sun- 
light, in bbls., per gal., 22c; per case, 
$2.35; Eocene, in bbls., per gal., 24c; 
per case, $2.50 ; Pennoline, in bbls., per 
gal., 24c; Crystal Spray, 23c; Silver 
Light, 21c; engine gasoline in barrels, 
gal., 27c; f.o.b. Winnipeg, in cases, $2.- 
75. 




DON'T SELL PAINT 
THAT IS CHEAP AND 
INFERIOR. The Falcon 
Brand for paints and 
varnishes, etc., means 
that they are not only 
good, but that they are 
the very highe«t grade 
that up-to-date paint 
v^^r 1 - making can produce. 

There's good money in it for you. 

Send us a sample order and we will prove our statement. 

PHASANTITE 

an ideal water paint. 

FALCONITE 

White Enamel of high-grade. 

LACKER ITE 

Our new Varnish Stains in 12 colors. 



Wilkinson, Hey wood & Clark, united 

EST. 1706 

300 Notre Dame St., MONTREAL 

Branches and agencies all over the world. 

FRANCIS C. REYNOLDS, Can. Manager. 



Any manufacturer can 
make a green paint. 
But there is only ONE 

IMPERIAL 

FRENCH GREEN 

It lasts years longer 
than any other green. 
Does not lose its 
brilliancy. Be sure the 
label has the name of 

LUCAS 



PHILADELPHIA 
BOSTON 



NEW YORK CHICAGO 

SAN FRANCISCO 



OJ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



GOOD CHEER LINE AT WINNIPEG EXHIBITION 



The Winnipeg branch of t lie James 
Stewart Mfg. Co . of Woodstock, made 
a fine display of their well-known line 
of Good Cheer stoves and furnaces. 

Their new, first-class steel range, the 
"Sunray Good Cheer," was given a 
prominent place in the exhibit and the 
interest in it. shown by both the general 
public and the many visiting stove deal- 
ers, evidences the attractiveness of this 
new line. The "Sunray" is supplied 
with eithei .1 IS or 20-inch oven, 1 and 
t;-hole top, on nickel-plated feet or sub- 
stantial east iron base, and in the usual 
combinations of square or with reser- 
voir, high shelf, high closet, and with 
either cast or coil waterfront. 

The construction throughout is of the 
most substantial nature, everything pos- 
sible to place it in the front rank of 
first-class steel ranges haying been done. 
In addition to the usual protection mi 
der oven bottoms of steel and asbestos. 
an additional bottom is provided, 



sen ice. There has been a most decided 
call for a furnace of its qualities by 
furnace men. the trouble having been 
that despite the first-class work of in- 
stallation which they do, the average 
furnace will often disappoint in both 
operating and radiating capacity and in 
lasting qualities, .mil as his workman- 
ship reputation is apt to suffer and fur- 
ther furnace contracts consequently in- 
ftuenced adversely through no fault of 
his, the dealer asks for a fuinaee as 
opd as his own work— and here it is. 
In tne first pi. ice, it is most easily set 
up. The radiator comes from factor) 
reads mounted and is of a height (20 
inches) which will permil of its being 
readily taken through the average cellar 
door opening and down crooked stair- 
ways. In the average good quality furn- 
ace there is a similarity up to the top 
of the firepot, and there ends, the radi- 
ators differing materially. This is the 
vital point of a furnace, as it determines 




"Good Cheer'' Stoves, Ranges and Furnaces at the Winnipeg Exhibition. 



suring the maximum radiation of heat 
with the oven through oven bottom and 
making the range a perfectly safe one 
to set on the floor without the protec- 
tive zinc or galvanized sheet usually re- 
quired. 

The fire-box linings are all of cast 
iron, the fireback being of a pattern 
which the company claim to be the 
most lasting of iron backs, as supplied 
for coal-burninti ranges All gates and 
linings are removable without disturb- 
ing waterfront. Front and end draft 
doors and sieves assure ample air to 
the fire, while the convenience of the 
end broiler door is well known. 

Another line which will be welcomed 
by the trade is their new series of 
Good Cheer furnaces for anthracite or 
bituminous coal, coke or wood. This 
line is the result of several years' de- 
signing, construction and testing, the 
aim of the company being to produce a 
warm air furnace capable of generating 
the maximum of heat from the fuel con- 
sumed, and of a construction which will 
stand the wear and tear of many vears' 



just what amount of heat is generated 
from the fuel consumed. 

The "Good Cheer," which having all 
the good constructive points as to 
roomy ash-pit, sectional fire-pot with 
cup joints, and heavy radiating flanges, 
also has a radiator which is not equal- 
led by any other in the market. This 
part alone of the 20-inch fire-pot size 
weighs 400 Its. No steel is anywhere 
exposed to direct action of the fire, be- 
iiiu only used for outside jacket of radi- 
ator. 

A series of heavy cast iron tubes sur- 
round the fire-pot. and in conjunction 
with the outside steel jacket, form a 
flue, through which all gases and pro- 
duets of combustion must pass com- 
pletely around furnace in one direction 
before passing into chimney. While this 
means that the series of tubes are heat- 
ed from both sides and therefore made 
most powerful heat radiators, all neces- 
sity of diving flues or divided drafts is 
avoided, and the result is a furnace the 
Hues of which cannot possibly choke up 
and which can be readily cleaned in five 

54 



minutes with tin- lire going at the same 
t ime. 

It has been demonstrated satisfactor- 
ily that the air admitted through feed 
door of the average furnace is not near- 
ly sufficient to create complete combus- 
tion of the gases and heat products 
arising from the lire, and as a conse- 
quence, much heat energy passes to the 
chimney and into the outside air un- 
consumed. This is the secret of the 
wastefulness of the average furnace. 

In the "Good Cheer" the top of fire- 
pot is surrounded by an air blast ring, 
which is furnished with air through 
tubes opening on either side of furnace. 
This ring distributes the necessary oxy- 
gen evenly over surface of fire and pro- 
\ ides the only medium yet devised for 
obtaining the maximum of heat from 
Hie fuel consumed. While this feature is 
of service in the use of any kind of fuel, 
it is invaluable in our Canadian North- 
west, where bituminous coals are so 
largely used. 

In other lines this company is also 
right up to the mark, as shown by their 
display of Oak Heaters, the well-known 
(rood Cheer art base burner, the smaller 
size of which can now be supplied in the 
highly artistic form as shown in their 
No. 55. Hot blast heaters, cast iron 
ranges, coal and wood cooks and a most 
complete line of small steel range cooks 
with or without high closets or reser- 
voirs. 

A. E. Karges, the oompany's man- 
ager of their Winnipeg branch, was in 
constant attendance welcoming the 
many out-of-town customers who called, 
and Charles E. Stewart, president and 
manager of the company, was also pres- 
ent making the acquaintance of the 
trade. 



LETTER BOX. 

Correspondence on matters of interest 
to the hardware trade is solicited. 
Manufacturers, jobbers. retailers and 
clerks are urged to express their opin- 
ions on matters under discussion. 

Any questions asked will be promptly 
answered. Do you want to buy anything, 
want some shelving, a silent salesman, 
any special line of goods, anything in 
connection with the hardware trade ? 
Ask us. We'll supply the necessary in- 
formation. 

Interest on Deposits and Loans. 
Editor Hardware and Metal : 

Sir —Your editorial about bank 
buildings and interests was very time- 
ly taken up. Why should the bankers be 
allowed to form a combine in restraint 
of trade, in only giving depositors three 
per cent, on deposits, then turning 
round and loaning out funds at seven, 
eight and ten per cent. ? Take for in- 
stance the case of the Home Bank, 
which previously to entering the bank- 
ers' association paid three and a half 
per ceat., and made more money than 
they are able to do at the present time. 
In order to secure the privileges of 
clearing house they had to reduce their 
rate to three per cent. 

A number of loan companys arc pay- 
ing four per cent. Of course depositors 
are not protected to the same exteat 
as in chartered banks, but, still they 
come under supervision of the govern- 
ment, which forced several weak loan 
companys to the wall. 

It looks as though the banks are keep- 
ing too much of the interests the ('•■ 
positor should get, and putting it into 
handsome buildings. DEPOSITOR. 

Toronto, July 23. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE 



Prompt Shlpmenl 



Tht ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON ONT. 



MACHINERY 

STEEL 

Smooth and 
Iron Finish 

All sizes in stock \" to 6" 

A.C. LESLIE & CO. 

Limited 
nONTREAL 



ii 



MIDLAND 



M 



BRAND. 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* far Prloa to Siln agent* 

Drummond, McCall 4 Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 

or to 

Canada Iron Furnaco Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Llmlt«o 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., unite. 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Utnuhoturtn of — ■» 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And HBMBNS-MARTII! 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



H <er 



Sure shooting, hard hitting and safe. Men dr 
light in owning it, and mothers and wives do not 
object. 

Iver Johnson A ^ a y tlc Revolver ^ 

It is the best made, the best advertised, and has the largestsale. 
1.500.000 IN USE 

Dealers always have been and always will be com 
pletely protected. 

These goods cannot be had as premiums, and we 
never sell by mail where a dealer can supply. 

Send for Catalogues or ask your jobber— he knows. 

Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works, 330 River St., Fitchburg, Mass 

Makers of Iver Johnson Truss Bridge Bicyles and Single Barrel Shotguns. 




TINPLATES 

All made out ot the 

BEST SIEMEN'S MARTIN STEEL 



Brand 

Best Coke or Charcoal "Rhyd" 

Good Charcoal "Edith" 

Second Charcoal "Sawel" 

Best Charcoal "Dryw" 

We are ready to offer the Canadian Trade 
very best value and finest quality in Tinplates. 

Baglan Bay Tlnplate Co., Limited 

Briton Ferry, South Wales 

Please mention above brands in your indents 
and inquiries. 



OAKEYS 



The original and only Genuine 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery, 6<1. and 1*. Canisters 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN 0AKEY& SONS, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Emery, Blaok Lead, Emery, Glass and 

Flint Cloths and Papers, etc 

Welilon Mi, Loin, Kuaii 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, - 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 

55 



NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Go, 

NICKEL FOR 

NICKEL STEEL 
The Orford Copper Go. 



WRITE US FOR 

PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



Ceneral Offloes 

43 EXCHANGE PLATE 

NEW YORK CITY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 

For additional items see the correspondence paces. The Editor 
solicits Information from any authoritative sourci- regarding build- 
ing and industrial news of air 6ort. the formation or incorporation 
of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, fnctorles or 
foundries, railway or mining news. 



Industrial Development. 
A Large boiler works will he establish- 
ed at Halifax, N.S. 

Valuable deposits of ochre have been 
found ileal' Saskatoon. Man. 

Fire .lest roved live blocks at Victoria 

icccnilv; damage, $3,250#00. 
Smith, Runciman >.V Co.. Toronto, will 

ereet a warehouse to COBl $45,000. 

The stock of the Fruitland Briek & 
Supply Co.. Fruitland. Out., is tor sale. 

The H. H. Dryden Co.. Sussex. N.B., 
will considerably enlarge their tinware 
plant. 

The assets of the C.ood Roadfi Ma- 
chinery Co.. Hamilton, are advertised for 
sale. 

The Massev-Harris Co. will erect a 
lacge factory 'at Brantford. Cut., to cost 
$20,000. 

The Bloomfield Packing Co. will erect 
a hirge canning factory at Ilillier. Out.. 
costing $25,800. 

A linn manufacturing heaters, stoves 
and furnaces is anxious to obtain a site 
in Sarnia. Out. 

The Canadian Bag Co.. Winnipeg, will 
erect a new bag factory in that city, 
,,. ,-ust $10,000. ' 

'flic International Turpentine Co. will 
install a plant in New Westminster, 
B.C., to cost $30,000. 

The Canada Woodenware Co. have 
been offered Btrong inducements to lo- 
cate in Chatham. N.B. 

The Canadian Shovel & Tool Co., 
Hamilton, Out., will erect an addition 
to their plant to cost $1,000. 

The Toronto Bolt & Forging Co., 
Swansea, will erect a plant at their pre- 
sent works, to cost $90*000. 

The British Columbia Electric Co. suf- 
fered damage to the extent of $1,000 
in the recent lire at Victoria. 

The pumping plant at Well ■"> of Fort 
William's waterworks system was de- 
stroyed by lire; loss. $12,090. 

A new steam heating plant and venti- 
lating system is to be installed in St. 
Joseph's Hospital. Guelph, Out. 

The Deleware Seamless Tube Co.. 

Reading, Pa., may build a Large plant 

at Sarnia. Out., to cost $200,000. 

A company has been formed for mak- 
ing ca«1 iron culverts and will estab- 
lish a plant in Fort Arthur. Out. 

The representatives id' the Ross Os 

dilating Pump are in Calgary looking 

for a purchaser for the Canadian rights. 

The plant of the Midland Engine 
Works i- again in operation. The 
capacity of the molding room has been 
doubled. 

The North Arm Lumber Co., Van- 
couver, has obtained a very suitable mill 
site and will at once erect a mill at ;< 



of $150,000. The machinerj has 

been ordered and the mill will be iii 
running order about the beginning of 

the year. 

The huge steam engine in the Ogilvie 
Flour Mills. Winnipeg, has been re- 
placed by an electric motor of L,200 
horse-power. 

The saw mill and woodworking fac- 
tory belonging to .1. 11. Simonson, at 
Spragues Mills. N.B., was destroyed by 

lire;' loss. $10,000. 

The Fells Lime Co.. at Rockport, X.I'... 
and the Rockport lee Co. suffered heav- 
ily by lire recently. The damage was 
estimated at $75,000. 

The Union Lumber Co. has been in- 
corporated in Edmonton to supply lum- 
ber to union men at a little above Cost. 
The capital is $250,000. 

The first installment of machinery lor 
the new pulp mill of the Gordon Paper 
Co., Dryden. Out., is on the ground and 
installation wilf commence immediate- 
ly. 

Fox & Co., mantel and woodwork 
manufacturers, will erect a factory in 
Windsor, Out., to cost $40,000 if the 
city will give them exemption from 
taxation and free Light and water. 

The Dominion Car tv. Foundry Co., 
Montreal, will creel a Large addition to 
their plant, to cost $2,000,000. A cast 
steed plant will cost $1,000,000 and a 
malleable iron plant and three steel car 
works will be erected. 

The fifteenth annual meeting of the 
shareholders of the Page Wire Fence 
Cd". was held recently. The year's re- 
port showed an enormous increase, the 
volume of sales being the Largest in the 
history of the company. The officers 
were all re-elected as follows: Presi- 
dent. Walter Clement; vice-president, 
X. L. ('lenient, secretary-treasurer, Mer- 
ton ChurCh. 

Companies Incorporated. 

Weston Tool and Xoveliits, Limited, 
manufacture and sell tools, cutlery, etc. 
Provisional directors, C. M. M. Colqu- 
houn, II. F. Erwin, .1. C. Webster, all 

of Toronto. 

O'Keeffe-Sanford, Limited, Toronto; 
capital. $40,008. To manufacture and 
deal in mantels, tiles and lire place 
fittings. Provisional directors, W. Webb. 
M. Whalen, T. Main. B. "F. Bennet, all 
of Toronto. 

Onaping Iron Ore Co.. Toronto; 
capital, $200,000. To carry on in all 
its branches mining, milling and reduc- 
ing of iron ores. Provisional directors, 
F. Denton. A. K. Cochrane, 0. .!. Valin, 
all of Toronto. 

Genera] Industries Construction Co., 
Toronto; capital, +100.00(1. To carry on 
a general construction business. Pro- 
visional directors, -T. A. Patterson, G. 



F. McFarland. A. McKenzie. W. II. 
Teinplelon. all id' Toronto. 

The Dominion Wheel Co.. Lindsay, 
Out.; capital, $40,000. To manufacture 

ami deal in till kinds of wheels and 

turned goods. Provisional directors. .1. 1). 
Flavelle, W. Mc Flavelle, .1. Carew, and 

T. Stewart, all of Lindsay. 

The Crown Oil Refining Co.. Hamilton, 
Ont.; capital. $40,000. To manufacture 
and deal in oil refining apparatus and 
refiners' supplies. Provisional directors, 
F. Hull. W. Perkins, .1. A. Hull, T. 
Haines, (i. F. Hull, all of Hamilton. 

Guelph Oil Clothing Co.. Guelph; 
capital, $50,000. To manufacture and 
deal in oil clothing, tents, awnings, etc. 

Provisional directors, (I. Mcl'herson, .1. 
T. Mcl'herson. R. E. Mcl'herson. G. A. 
Mcl'herson, all of (Juelpli. 

The Teciunseh and Walkerville Oil 
and Gas Co.. Walkerville. Out.; capital, 
$40,000. To carry on an oil and gas 
business. Provisional directors. .). 

Dugal, 1*. Dugal, II. A. Walker, H. C. 
Walker. R. .). Colloton. all of Walker- 
ville. 

William Hamilton Co.. Peterborough, 
Out.; capital, $300,000. To deal in ma- 
chinery, contractors' and builders' sup- 
plies and carry on the business of ma- 
chinists and engineers. Provisional di- 
rectors, W. (!. Ferguson. W. S. David- 
son, G. L. Hay, R. M. Glover, J. I). 
Clarke, all of Peterborough. 

The Xew Liskeard Clock Co., New 
Liskeard. Nip..; capital, $40000; To 
manufacture (docks, novelties, dies, tools 
and sheet metal work and to carry on 
the business of machinists and engin- 
eers. Provisional directors S. D. Bidden, 
J. Armstrong, M. McLcod, 1). McKelvie. 
J. Redpath, all of New Liskeard. 

Building Notes. 

A large armory is to he erected al 
Fernie. B.C. 

Tenders are invited for an armory 
for Brandon, Man. 

The Bank of Montreal will erect a 
block in Sudbury. Out. 

A new church will be erected at 
Lorette, Que., costing $100,000. 

A fish hatchery will be erected at 
Newcastle, X.P>., to cost $5,000. 

A mission school will be erected af 
Kitamaal. ]).('., to cost $'Jo,000. 

The Canadian Hank id' Commerce are 
erecting a branch at Elkhom, Man. 

Municipal Undertakings. 

The new jail at Sydney. X.S., will 

cost $i:;..v>o. 

Gracefield, Que., will install a water- 
works system. 

Halifax. X.S., will instal water meters 
a I a cost of $50,000. 

The land tille offices at Hattleford, 
Sask.. will coal $31,000. 

Whitewater, Man., will install a 
municipal telephone system. 

A municipal waterworks system will 
be installed at South Vancouver, B.C. 

The contract for the municipal light- 
in.; system for Hattleford, Sask., has 



II A R DWA R E AND M RT \ I. 



CONDENSED OK "WAM" 
ADVERTISEnENTS. 

AdT«rti«ement« under thi» heading 2c. a word fir«t 
■urlion ; lc. a word each aubsequent insertion. 

Contractioni count as one word, but five figures (as 
$1,000) ara allowed as one word. 

Cash remittances to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no oaae can this rule be overlooked . 
Advertisements received without remittance cannot be 
acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
tents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



AGENT WANTED. 



AGENT wanted to push an advertised line of Welsh 
tinplttes; write at first to "B.B.," care HARD- 
WARE AND METAL, 88 Fleet St., E.G., 
London, Eng. [if] 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

MINING hardware, stoves and tinware business for 
sale; sales $4,000 monthly; buildings and lot, 
$3,500; present stock, $8,000; proprietor's 
health failing; a bonanza. Box 643, HARDWARE 
AND METAL, Toronto. [32] 

EXPERIENCED business man wishes to meet cap- 
able energetic young man with a thorough know- 
ledge of hardware and Steves and with two or 
three thousand dollars in cash ; advertiser would join 
him in purchasing some desirable business and provide 
seven or eight thousand capital. Address Box 644, 
HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. 

FOR SALE — Well established hardware, tinshop, 
implement and undertaking business, also good 
lumberyard, well fenced, with lumber and lime 
sheds in good condition ; we will sell above altogether, 
or divide same to suit purchaser; proprietors are 
retiring from business in Manitoba, and therefore wish 
for immediate sale. Apply to Eaklns & Griffin, Shoal 
Lsk ;, Man. [33] 

WANTED— Partner to take half interest in one of 
the best hardware propositions in Algoma ; 
plumber preferred. Box 636, HARDWARE 
AND METAL, Toronto. [32] 

HARDWARE, tinware, stove and plumbing business 
In manufacturing town in the Niagara Penlnsnla ; 
no competition ; $250,000 factory and water- 
marks will be completed this summer; stock about 
$3,000; death of owner reason for selling. Box 85, 
Thorold, Ont. [tf] 

HARDWARE, Stove and Tinware Business for sale 
in live Western Ontario village; first class 
chance ; good reasons for selling. Address Box 
640, HARDWARE AND METAL. 

FOR SALE— A good hardware business in Western 
Ontario; stock about $6,000. For further refer- 
ence apply The Hobbs Hardware Co., Limited, 
London, Ont. [32] 

HARDWARE and Tin Business for Sale in good 
Western Ontario town of 3,000: stock about 
S3, 500; good reasons for selling. Address, Box 647 
HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. (34) 



FOB SALE. 



FOR SALE — First-class set of tinsmith's tools 
second-hand but almost as good as new ; includes 
an 8-foot iron brick almost new. Apply Pease 
Waldon Co., Winnipeg. [tfl 

FOR SALE, CHEAP— About thirteen kegs cut nails, 
sizes two to five inches. Box 642, HARDWARE 
AND METAL, Toronto. [31] 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 

TINSMITHS WANTED — Firsi-class tinsmiths 
wanted for points west of Winnipeg; must be 
good mechanics capable of taking charge of a 
metal department; thorough knowledge of furnace 
work necessary. Pease Waldon Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
ltf]_ 

WANTED — A salesman familar with plumbing 
supplies and gas rangts, to represent a Canadian 
manufacturer direct to the wholesale and retail 
trade; must have acquaintance with the trade; best of 
references will be expected ; give full information con- 
cerning experience, acquaintance with the trade, salary 
expected ; good position for the right person. Only 
those who can fill the above qualifications need apply 
Box 639, HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. 

WANTED— Hardware clerk, experienced, who can 
keep stock, and is willing to do so ; sober and 
active ; state age, experience and salary expected 
at start. Hose & Caoniff, Kenora, Ont. [32] 




When this sign 
goes up on your 
store it means big- 
ger business and 
.profits for you 



THIS sign on your store represents The Sherwin- 
Williams Agency. The Sherwin-Williams 
Agency represents the best made paints, the 
best advertised paints, and the best selling paints. It 
means bigger business and profits for you. 

Many people look for this sign when they want 
paints for any purpose. They have found from ex- 
perience, or through friends and neighbors, that 

Sherwin-Williams" 

stands for highest quality and best results in paints. They 
know the goods are the standard of excellence. 

A Sherwin-Williams Agency— this sign on your 

store— brings business you would not otherwise secure. 

You get the advantages of the reputation that goes with 

S-W. Products. 

Write us and we'll be glad to write you and tell 

you all about our splendid proposition and the way we 

will co-operate with you to build up the best business 

you ever had — a better business than you can get in any 

other way. 

The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

LARGEST PAINT AND VARNISH 
MAKERS IN THE WORLD 

Canadian Headquarters and Plant : 639 Centre St., Montreal. Que. 
Warehouses ■• 86 York St., Toronto, and Winnipeg Man. 



«•*■ 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 



SITUATION wanted as master mechanic or chief 
engineer by man of 22 years' experience as a 
mechanic; can give Al reference as to ability; 
strictly temperate. Box A, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto. [32] 

GERMAN (31), 14 years' commercial experience 
desires siluation; perfect knowledge of tools, 
hardware, fittings of every description, wooden 
goods, bar iron, steel, metals, also bookkeeping short- 
hand (English and German) typewriting, storekeeping ; 
at liberty on about October 1st. Address 0783 care of 
Messrs. Deacon's, Leadenhall Street, London, E.C. 

COMMERCIAL gentleman with nine years' trade 
connection with ironmongers, architects and pub- 
lic institutions in Great Britain desires position as 
representative of a Canadian manufacturing firm. 
Box X, HARDWARE AND METAL, Montreal. 

HARDWARE Salesman or Clerk, seven years' ex- 
perience, desires situation. Abstainer, best of 
references; position in the West preferred. A. Tilley, 
Branttord, Ont. (31) 



W 'ANTED (by Englishman) position in Hardware 
store, experience in all branches, bookkeeper, 
would invest $400 to $500, Address, Box 646 
HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. (31) 



WANTED. 







FF1CE space wanted by manufacturer In Toronto; 
state location and terms. Box 645, HARDWARE 
AND METAL, Toronto. [32] 

57 



THE WANT AD 



The want ad. has grown from a 
little used force in business life, 
into one of the great necessities 
of the present day. 

Business men nowadays turn to 
the " want ad " as a matter of 
course for a hundred small ter- 
v ices . 

The want ad. gets work foi 
workers and workers for work. 

It Rets clerks for employers and 
tinds employers for clerks. It 
brings together buyer and seller, 
and enables them to do business, 
though they may be thousands of 
miles apart. 

The " want ad." is the great 
force in the small affairs and inci- 
dents of dailv life. 



HARD W A K F. AND MET A L 



awarded to .1. Stewarl & I 
Winnipeg, agents for the Canadian 
Westinghouse I 

The conucil of the town of Hordeh, 
Man., have awarded the contracts for 
the municipal electric lighting plant 
The steam plant will be installed by the 
Robb Engineering Co., Amherst, N.S.. 
and the electric portion by the Allis- 
Chalmer^-Bullock, Limited. 

Railroad Construction. 

The C-P.R. will erect a coal handling 
plant at Fort William. Onl.. to cost 
$1,250,000. 

Track-laying will be commenced on 
the Mackenzie & Maim line at Garneau 
Junction, Que. 

The new coal chute for the C.P.R. at 
Lethbridge is completed and giving com- 
plete satisfaction. 

The Canadian Northern line from St. 
Jerome to Montford, Que., will be in 
operation this fall. 

The O.P.R. will immediately take 
steps to double-track their line from 
Brandon to Winnipeg 1 , 

Saskatoon and Goose Lake. Man., have 
petitioned .Mackenzie & .Mann for a 
branch line between those towns. 

The Sydney and Glace Bay Railway, 
Sydney. N.S.. will erect their central 
power station at Dominion No. 4. 



SIGHT FOR SHOOTING AT NIGHT. 

The development of accuracy in shoot- 
in c; at night has received a double im- 
petus in the British service. A new 
sight has been adopted, and is being 
manufactured and issued with all possi- 
ble dispatch. This sight, a telescopic 
pattern, is defined by electric light for 
night work. It has been extensively 
tried under all conditions and has prov- 
ed a signal success. Quite recently, al- 
so, a greatly improved thirty-six-inch 
searchlight has supplanted the regula- 
tion twenty-four-inch light, which is 
capable of defining an enemy at over 
double the distance of its predecessor. 
Owing to the excellent training afforded 
by the gunnery branch, naval gunners 
can now with the aid of their la lest 
sight and searchlight depend on 
disabling the enemy at from 3, 000 to 
1,000 yards on a favorable night. 



ELECTRICAL SHOW. 

A big electrical show will be held in 
the Drill Hall, at Montreal, from Sept. 
2 to 11 next. Space has already been 
ed by prominent firms, including 
the Canadian General Electric, the Al- 
lis-Chalmers-Bullock,6 the Canadiaq 
WcstinRhouse Co , the Bell Telephone 
Co., the Montreal Light, Heat &> Power 
Co., the Crocker-Wheeler Co., of New 
York City, the Wagner Electric Co., of 
St. Louis, and the Packard Electric Co., 
of St. Catharines. Without doubt this 
display will be very attractive and in- 
teresting. The show will be essentially 
of an electrical character, and various 
exhibitions will be given of the uses to 
which electricity can be put. The con- 
vention Of the Electrical Association, 
will be held in Montreal, on Sept. 11, 
12, tfc 



Consolidated 

Plate 

Class 

Company 

of Canada 

Limited 



BEST ELBOWS 

FOR 

CONDUCTOR 
PURPOSES 

BEAR 
TRADE MARK 



Glazing 
Glass 



of all kinds 



LOWEST PRICES 
ASK FOR THEM 



Write Nearest Office 



TORONTO 

MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 




PLAIN ROUND. 

CORRUGATED. 




For Sale by the TRADE 

in Canada. Write for 

catalogue and 

samples to 



Jobbers and 



Ferdinand Dieckhann 

1180-82-84 HARRISON AVB. 

CINCINNATI, 0., U.S.A. 



58 



Hardware and Metal PAINT, OIL WD BRUSH TRADES 



BERRY BROTHERS' VARNISHES 

are one grand story of success 

BECAUSE THEY ARE THE BEST 

They are the safest goods to handle, 
and the most reliable goods to use. 

Write for Catalogue, Information and Prices. 



BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 

-wvohk Varnish Manufacturers Chicago 

PHILADELPHIA DETROIT ST LOUIS 

BALTIMORE Canadian Factory— WALKERVILLE, ONT. SAN FRANCISCO 



Prove Our Claims at Our Expense 

The manufacturer — not sure of his product — dare not talk in that way over 
his name. Because we know our VARNISH TURPENTINE to be incompar- 
able and because thousands of practical men declare it to be so are our only 
reasons for making such an offer. Test, at our expense, our 

VARNISH TURPENTINE 

Tt contains no naptha. It is free from benzine. It dries as quickly as spirits 
of turpentine. It cannot leave sticky varnish. And it works just like spirits 
but is infinitely safer — having a fire test 40 degrees higher than benzine. We 
guarantee that every barrel of our Varnish Turpentine will do any work that 
spirits will do, and do that work better. Test it at our expense. 

The Defiance Mfg. ®> Supply Co. 

TORONTO .... ONTARIO 



59 



PAIXT. nil. WD BRUSH TK \.DES 



Hardware and Mefal 



News of the Paint Trade 



ISLAND CITY PAINT WORKS. 

Since i ho Large extensions were made 
in their works Last year I'. 1». Hods & 
Co., manufacturers oi paints and vai 
nishes, Montreal, have transacted a 
volume of business, and the de 
mand for their brands of paint are 
steadilj increasing, so much that even 
now with the enlarged plant thej find 
it difficult to meet the demand. The 
best evidences of progress are growth 
and expansion, for they go hand in hand. 
From the daj thai "Island City" 
brands were first pul on the market the 
popularity and demand tor them has 
Bteadilj grown, and the factories have 
Bteadirj expanded. Ten years ago when 
this paint manufactory was in its in- 
fancy its dimensions were insignificant, 
30 feet frontage and 30 feet depth. To- 
day it occupies a frontage of 2">(i Eeel 
and a depth of 130 feel 

The strongest factor in the upbuilding 
of an industry is convenience of loca- 
tion. Proximity to railroads and steam- 
ships means economy of time and 
economy in expenses. Few firms 
could be more conveniently situated 
than P. D. Dods & Co. A railroad sid- 
ing runs past their front doors, and but 
a block, distant is the Lachine Canal, 
thus affording to the company excellent 
facilities for transportation. 

The Island City Paint Co. claim to 
have the largest and most complete 
pulp-color and dry-color plant in Can- 
ada. All the latest improvements have 
been adopted in their process both for 
economizing manual help and for per- 
fecting the products. Very little pulp- 
color is now being made by this com- 
pany as a small demand exists for it, 
BO that a large percentage of the pulp- 
color is manufactured into dry-colors, 
for which there is always a steady de- 
mand. 

P. I). Dods & Co. claim for them- 
selves the discovery of a paint which is 
so impervious to rain and other forms 
of moisture as to prevent any iron or 
steel material to which the paint is ap- 
plied, from rusting. This paint has 
proved a great success and has become 
popular amongst structural steel manu- 
facturers. It is known by the brand 
"Anti-Rust" paint. 

The company has realized the value of 
branch establishments and have them 
extending across the Dominion — one in 
Toronto at 145 Church Street, recently 
partially destroyed by fire; another in 
Winnipeg at 328 Smith Street, and 
their Pacific coast branch in Vancouver. 
The Henry Darling Co. have their 
agency in Vancouver. 



PAINT AND OIL GOSSIP. 
Alexandre Cooker and Aldemars Cook- 
er, St. Poly-Carpe, Que., have been re- 
gistered to 'any on a painting busi- 
The new firm will be known as A. 
( looker & Sons. 

T. \V. Hilo, Kingston, Ont., who has 
been running a painting and livery busi- 
has sold the livery part of his es 
tablishment to A. .Mcllquhan. 

Frank Ruelena and Robert Lansloot, 
.Montreal. (Maisonneuve) have been re- 
gistered to carry on business as painters 
under the firm name of F Ruelens & 



We Have a Heap 

of other lines to sell you that are sure to follow if we can 
once get you started on Elastilite Varnish. 

It is so good and does so well all we claim it will 
do, your customers will demand other lines from the 
same makers. 

Elastilite is a Magnet that Attracts Trade and 
Holds it. For outside or inside. 

In tins only, h pts. to 1 gallon. 

See Catalogue No. 10, page 3— 
then follow on for other lines. 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

Ihe Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, CANADA 

Stocks at 

WINNIPEG, MAN., c/o MASON & HICKEY. 
VANCOUVER, B.C., C/O DURAND MERCHANDISE CO. 



LIMITED 



I 



BRONZE POWDER and BRONZE LIQUIDS 



ARE GUARANTEED WHEN MADE BY 



The Canadian Bronze Powder Works 

Backed by long experience, R. E. Thorne & Co. have unsurpassed facilities for 
filling orders at short notice. Write for particulars. 



MONTREAL 

NO ORDER TOO LARGE, 



TORONTO 

EXTENSIVE WORKS AT VALLEYFIELD, QUE 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 




To be obtained from the principal Dealers in Glass, Hardware, and Painters' Supplies. 

Contractors to H. M. Government and the principal English Sheet and Plato Glass 

Works 



OaBERTSOj^s 
COME? 



Gi/bertson's Sheets 

and the COMET Brand 

mean quality and security in whatever work 
you may undertake. 

Galvanized flat sheets that are unequalled as 
to flatness; absolute trueness to gauge; admir- 
ably suited in softness for any working. Note 
the brand "COMET." GILBERTSON on 
every sheet means security. 
W GILBERTSON & CO., Limited. Pontardiwi, South Walts 

ALEX. GIBB, 13 St. Joib St., Montreal, Ageit 



60 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



IIMT ENDURANCE 

There is a lot of paint on the market which looks all right when it's first put on. But the beauty of 

NEW ERA PAINT 

is that IT LASTS. It looks fine. when it's first put on, and it KEEPS ON LOOKING FINE. That's why hardwaremen find 
it profitable. It pleases customers— same thing with all the paints and varnishes made by 

STANDARD PAINT AND VARNISH WORKS CO., LIMITED 

WINDSOR ONTARIO 



IT IS OFTEN EASY 
TO PERSUADE 

your customer that the best 
is the cheapest. 

JAMIESONS 

Floor Enamel 

while more expensive than 
ordinary floor paint, is so 
much better for the floor 
that it should not be diffi- 
cult to induce your cus- 
tomer to try it. 

It Dries Hard 
Is Never Sticky 
Gives a Varnish Gloss 
Stands Repeated Washing 
and Wears Like Iron 

You can make more profit 
on Floor Enamel thaja you 

can on floor paint. 

Write for show cards and 
prices to 

R. G, JAMIESON & CO. 

LIMITED 

16-30 Nazareth St., MONTREAL. 



HEADQUARTERS 



FOR 



Window Glass, 
Paints, Oils, 

Fine Varnishes 

SANDERSON PEARCY & CO., Ltd. 

Toronto, Canada 




STOVE PIPE 




SCHEIP'S 
PATENT NESTED 

25 lengths in crate 

We also 

manuf aclure 

a full line 

of Cooper's 

Elbows. 

The Best 

on 

the Market. 



This is the only perfect working Knock Down Pipe made, will not telescope. 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., HAMILTON, ONT. 




GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS OF PROVED WORTH, 

Having a Century's Reputation for Reliability. 
MADE BY 

A. SHAW & SON, London. Ens. 

CANADIAN AGENT 

GODFREY S. PELTON, - 201 Coristine Building, Montreal 

6i 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



Paint and Oil Markets 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, August -. — Business con- 
tinues dull throughout the paint and oil 
markets here, though there has been a 
slighl increase in the volume of trade 
during the past two or throe days. Or* 
dors continue to arrive for paints and 
oils in sorting quantities, but, generally 
speaking, the market is quiet. However, 
us many members 01 jobbing st alt's, as 
Well as heads of departments, are still 
away on vacations, there is plenty of 
business to keep the reduced staffs of 
the local supply houses busy. 

White Lead — The demand is good for 
the end of July, when jobbers do not 
count on disposing of much. Prices con- 
tinue firm and show no disposition to 
change. Genuine pure white lead is 
quoted at $7.65, and No. 1 is held at • 
$7.25. 

Red Lead — The market continues a 
trifle dull, though a fair business is be- 
ing done in sorting quantities. Present 
quotations are as follows: Genuine, in 
casks of 500 lbs., $6.25 ; ditto, in kegs of 
100 lbs., $6.75; No. 1, in casks of 500 
lbs., $5; ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., $5.50. 

Paris Green — This commodity at pres- 
ent furnishes the most interesting fea- 
ture of the market. The demand for 
Paris urccn, which almost invariably 
falls off about the second or third week 
in July, is still strong and a supply of 
pound packages is no longer available. 
Prices remain unchanged, but the best 
selling cask goods of Paris green are 
also becoming scarce and only the fact 
that the demand is likely to slacken be- 
fore long keeps the price from advanc- 
ing. We still quote this commodity at 
the following prices: Canadian Paris 
green, 29 Jc. base; English Paris green, 
30ic 

Petroleum — The demand is steady 
and will not increase until the nights be- 
gin to grow longer. Present prices are: 
Prime white, 13c; water white, 14Jc. ; 
Pratt's astral, 18c. 

Shellac — The market is dull, though 
the quantity sold for this time of the 
year is good: Pure orange, in barrels, 
$2.70; white, $2.82* per barrel; No. 1, 
I orange), $2.50. 

Turpentine — There has been no change 
in the price since the drop of last week 
and turpentine still remains a little dull. 
'Hie price has now reached a trifle low- 
er figure than was at any time during 
the month of July last year. In the 
month of August last year the prices be- 
gaa to advance and during the month an 
advance of 4c. per gal. took place. There 
is no certainty that this will be repeat- 
ed this year, but as the price is now 
■ than was anticipated at (he be- 
ginning of the season, it would not be 
surprising if the market should take a 
firmer tone again this August. In rosins 
there has not bees much change during 
the week. The extra fine grades have 
suffered a ^Irjht decline, while the cheap 
grades have advanced at the point of 



production. The local market is still 
quid and the following prices arc still 
quoted: Single barrels Slle. ; two barrels, 
and upwards, 79c. t'.o.b. point of ship- 
ment, net .'HI days;, less than barrels, 5c. 
advance. Terms: 2 per cent., 30 days. 

Linseed Oil — The market in Great Bri- 
tain a week ago seemed to indicate some 
considerable decline, but during the past 
few days prices have again advanced and 
if any great demand should spring up in 
the next two weeks prices may stiffen, 
as stocks are light, and it will yet be 
six weeks or possibly two months be- 
fore Canadian crushers have new seed to 
work on. However, just at present the 
local market is weak and a two cent 
drop has taken place since last week. 
We now quote: Raw, 1 to 3 barrels, 65c; 
1 barrels and over, 64c. 

Add three cents to this price for boil- 
ed oil f.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, London 
and Guelph, 30 days. 

For additional prices see current mar- 
ket quotations at the back of the paper. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, August 2. — The feature of 
the past week in local paint and oil 
circles has been the multitude of sorting 
orders received for Paris green, especial- 
ly from the Eastern Provinces. On- 
tario appears to have had its quota, and 
it looks as if all the Paris green in the 
hands of the makers will be required for 
the eastern districts. 

The demand for general mixed paints 
has been very well maintained, and al- 
though the weather has been unsettled, 
a great deal of work is being done. In- 
dustrial paints are experiencing a strong 
demand. The condition of the trade 
on the whole is quite satisfactory. 
Transportation facilities are steadily im- 
proving, although there are even yet 
glaring instances of delay and in- 
capacity. 

Turpentine — This continues at the 
lowest point in price that has been 
touched for some years, and consumers 
are somewhat inclined to recover, al- 
though the outlook is very uncertain. 
Dealers report good trade. Owing to a 
controversy which is supposed to be 
in progress in the south, much uncer- 
tainty exists, and a further drop of 
3 cents has occurred in the prices. 
Single barrels are now quoted at 80 
eents. 

Linseed Oil — Continues to weaken and 
prices have been marked down 2 cents. 
We now quote: Raw, 1 to 4 bbls., 62c; 
5 to 0. (ile; boiled, 1 to 4 bbls., 65c; 5 
to 9 bbls., 64c. 

Ground White Lead — A moderate de- 
mand prevails. Prices are unchanged: 
Covernmenl standard, $7.50; No. 1, $7; 
No. '_'. $6.75; No. 3, $6.35. 

Dry White Zinc — Situation is un- 
cli.iiitred. Demand is moderate with ade- 
quate supplies: V.M. Red Seal, 7 ] / 2 c; 
Red Seal, 7c: French V.M., 6c; Lehigh, 
5c. 

62 



55 



is 



Japanese 
Enamel 

White 



s a hard -drying, high lustre 
Enamel of superior quality. 

It has been sold and used 

with great success for the 

past twenty-five years. 

The extensive demand this season 



i 



for a 



High Grade 
Interior 
Gloss 
White 



for walls, woodwork, furniture, 
etc., has increased the sale of 
"Japanese" Enamel White all 
over Canada. 

It is put up in attractive form, in 
convenient sizes, and is a good 
seller, proving eminently satisfac- 
tory wherever sold. 
Try your trade with a few cases of 
"Japanese" Enamel White. 
We manufacture "Japanese" 
Enamels in over thirty shades 



besides black and white. 




L 



Marahall-Wella Company, Winnipeg, 
Sole distributors for Western Canada. 



I 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND RRUSH TRADES 



Window Glass 



Come to us for all kinds of glass. Let us 
quote you on every specification. We have 
immense stocks in our large new warehouses. 

Star Window Glass 
Diamond Picture Glass 
Double Diamond Glass 
Colored Glass 
Rolled Glass 
Cathedral Glass 
Wire Glass 

Heavy 26 oz. 32 oz. Glass 
and Glass of all hinds. 

LET US QUOTE 



A, RAMSAY & SON COMPANY 



Class 
Dealers 



MONTREAL 



lO to 22 
Inspector St. 



What Are Your Oil Profits ? 



Are they all they ought 
to be? 

Do the losses and the 
expense of handling the 
oils, eat away the difference 
between the cost price and 
the selling price? 

You Can Increase Your 
Profits. 

You can reduce two- 
thirds of the expense of 
handling and you can stop 
the losses altogether by stor- 
ing and handling all your 
oils in Bowser Tanks. 



Catalog V 
How. 



Tells You 



Write us a postal asking 
for catalog V and we will 
send it with full informa- 
tion and prices. Tell us 
what oils you handle and 
in what quantities. 




Cut 15-Cellar Outfit. 
For Heavy Oils. 



Write to-day. 



S. F. BOWSER & C0. y Limited 

Toronto, Can. 



66-68 Fraser Ave. 




ISLAND CITY ANTI-RUST PAINTS 

To Architects and Structural Steel Manufacturers. 

Our Anti-Rust Paints are made specially to prevent the effects of Electrolysis on 
iron and steel. They are guaranteed to stand moisture, heat, frost and contraction, 
and will keep the metal covered to its standard strength — being made expressly for 
Bridges and Structural Work. Prices and Samples for testing can be had by 
applying to 



P. D. D0D5 £» CO. 



162-164 McGILL STREET, 



MONTREAL. 



63 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



White Zinc Ground in Oil — The call 
tor this is steady. Prices are firm: 
Pure, 8 x 

Putty— Manufacturers are busily en- 
d endeavoring to keep pace with 
the demand. No change is made in the 
prices: Pore linseed oil, $1.85 hulk; in 
barrels, $1.60; in 25-Ib. irons. $1.90; in 
tins. $2; bladder putty, in barrels, - 

Bed Lead— A Lair demand exists. We 
continue to quote: Genuine red lead, in 
casks. $6.25; in 100-tt). kegs, $6.50; in 
quantities at $7.25 per 100 lbs. No. 
1 red lead, easks. $6; kegs, $6.25, and 
smaller quantities, $7. 

l'aris Green — The volume of business 
being done in this is steadily increasing. 
ni districts are taking a large per- 
centage of the shipments. Prices are 
firm and unchanged. 

Gum Shellac — No change has occurred 
in the situation: Fine orange, 60c per 
Hi.: medium orange, 55c per lb.; white 
(bleached), 65c. 

Shellac Varnish — The demand for all 
linos of shellac and varnish is steady. 
Prices are firm: Pure white bleached 
shellac, $2.S0; pure orange, $2.60; No. 
1 orange, $2.40. 



tine the solid residue must be tough and 
hard, and must not "dust" when 
scratched with a knife. (6) Benzine or 
a mineral oil of any kind will not be 
permitted. 



BRUSHES IN CARTONS. 
Scrub brushes, shoe brushes and stove 
brushes put in half-dozen cartons make a 
very neat way for placing brushes on the 
shelves, besides, helping to make good 
window displays. The United Factories 
are placing- a large number of their 
lines in this more convenient way to 
handle brushes of all kinds. 



STANDARD SPECIFICATION FOR 
JAPAN. 
Robert Job, chemist of the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad, after a series of tests 
and analyses of japan, has drawn up the 
following standard specifications: 

(1) When equal parts by weight of 
japan and pure turpentine are thorough- 
ly mixed and poured over a slab of 
glass, which is then placed nearly ver- 
tical at a temperature of 100 degrees 
Falir.. with free access to air, but not 
exposed to draught, the coating should 
be hard and dry, neither brittle nor 
sticky in not exceeding 12 hours. (2) 
When thoroughly mixed with ordinary 
pore linseed oil at the ordinary tem- 
perature in proportions of 5 per cent. 
weight of japan to 95 per cent, weight 

aw linseed oilj. no curdling should 
result, nor any observable separation or 
settling on standing. (3) When the 

e mixture is flowed over a slab of 

. which is then placed nearly ver- 
tical at a temperature of 100 degrees 
Fahr., with free access to air, but not 

sed to draught, the coating shall 
dry throughout, neither brittle nor 
sticky, in not exceeding two hours. (4) 
When 5 c.c. of the japan are poured in- 
to 95 c.c. of pure turpentine ot the or- 
dinary temperature and thoroughly 
shaken, a clear solution shall result 
without residue on standing an hour. 
(5) After evaporation of the turpen- 



MASTER PAINTERS' CONVENTION. 

The sessions of the convention of the 
Blaster Painters' and Decorators' Asso- 
ciation of Canada, held at London, Ont. 
last week, were very well attended. 
Many interesting and educative papers 
were read and the keen discussion which 
followed each showed the deep interest 
taken in the subjects by those present. 

The convention concluded its sessions 
on Friday and officers for the year were 
elected as follows : President, H. R. 
Reynolds, Guelph; vice-president, Aid. 
Richard Booth, London; secretary-treas- 
urer, Alex. McKenzie, Hamilton. The 
delegates to the international conven- 
tion are Messrs. Reynolds, Booth and 
McKenzie. 

The choosing of the place for the next 
convention was left with the executive. 



FACTS ABOUT GASOLINE. 

In view of the scare which the large 
number of recent gasoline explosions have 
caused among Canadian sailing men re- 
garding the use of gasoline on yachts, a 
few facts concerning the conditions un- 
der which gasoline will explode will be 
interesting and perhaps reassuring just 
at this time. 

A gasoline tank rarely explodes. It 
cannot unless it contains gasoline vapor 
and air in explosive proportions, which 
latter condition is almost never present. 
It does not explode because it contains 
too little air or too much gasoline. Ex- 
plosive gasoline vapor consists of ten 
per cent, gasoline and ninety per cent, 
air. The accidental formation of this 
vapor might not occur in years as the 
proportions must be more or less exact. 
Even if a tank of gasoline were to burst 
from heat applied to its exterior, the 
confined heavy gas would not explode if 
in contact with flame or fire, but would 
burn instead. A tank of gasoline with 
no vent could do considerable damage 
were it to burst and throw burning oil 
and flaming gas about, but 1.000 gallons 
of gasoline in a vessel's bilges would 
not be so dangerous from explosion as 
a hundredth of that amount. The lar- 
ger quantity would burn rapidly, while 
the smaller would be sufficient, if mixed 
with the proper amount of air, to de- 
molish utterly almost any boat. 



REMOVING PAINT FROM IRON 
TANK. 

To remove paint from an iron tank, 
take lime and mix with common lye 
into a thick paste by the addition of 
water, says Engineering Review, and 
apply over the surface of the metal 
with a mason's trowel to a thickness of 
about 4 in. After allowing the mixture 
to remain a short time, wash off with 
a hose and most of the old paint will 
be entirely removed, the remainder be- 
ing easily scraped off with a scraper. 
If the tank contains several coats of 
dried paint, two or three applications 
will be necessary before the entire sur- 
face is clean. 



THE 
CANADA 
PAINT 
COMPANY'S 



Oxidised Art Enamels are ex- 
tremely popular for "touch- 
ing-up" and beautifying a 
number of articles. They 
will give a superior finish to 
Tables, Chairs, Bird Cages, 
Bedsteads, Wicker Ware and 
Ornaments generally. 

To cover larger surfaces, 
such as wood-work in the 
Parlours, Halls or Bedrooms, 
the Canada Paint Company's 
Oxidised Art Enamels may be 
ordered through the dealer 
in large tins. 

For enamelling Baths, 
please ask for the Canada 
Paint Company's Bath Enamel 
—the standard for excell- 
ence. 

The enamel effect gives 
perfect sanitation and makes 
the Canada Paint Company's 
Art Enamel impervious to the 
accumulation or absorption 
of dirt or dust. It is easily 
cleaned by being wiped off 
with a soft cloth, or tepid 
water and castile soap. 

Instructions for applying 
will be found upon each pack- 
age. 

ENAMELS 



64 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Our proposition to agents handling our line includes a com- 
prehensive plan for rendering you valuable assistance in securing 
trade. As soon as you become an agent for 

Martin-Senour Paint 

100 PER CENT PURE 

this plan immediately begins to operate in your interest; advertising 
your stock — giving your place of business greater publicity. 
We haven't the space here to make full explan- 
ation, but we will gladly do so by mail if you 
will write to us. Our plan is a trade winner. 

Write today. 

The MARTIN-SENOUR CO. Ltd., 

"Pioneers of Pure Paints" 

142-144 Inspector Street. Montreal 2514-2522 Quarry St. and Archer Ave.. Chicago (Est. 1878) 

The WINNIPKG PAINT & GLASS CO. Ltd., The MARITIME PAINT & VARNISH CO. Ltd., 

HALIFAX, N. 8. 




WINNIPKG. 




a sraiW'gyA^g-r.wre^rti^^^^ 



v*am)m**mm'\Bt 




1007. Durability 



A Flourishing Business cannot be built up in the Hardware Hue by the man who ignores 
paint and its results. Paint is the one thing no Hardwareman can afford to slight. Since 
good paint is necessary, why not eliminate all cause for worry by stocking 

ARK BRAND PAINT 

the paint thai has greater covering capacity and durability, two coats being equal to three 
coats of other mixed paints? ARK BRAND is the result of persistent effort to make a 
paint free from the faults of white lead and mixed paints. 



MURESCO 



is as much different to the ordinary wall tinisli as the light of the sun is to the 
light of the moon. No wall finish ever marketed comes near approaching 
MURESCO in Quality or Durability. MURESCO is used exclusively by the best 
decorators in Canada, and their claims for MURESCO as a profit builder should 
be in the hands of every Dealer interested in his bank account. 

BENJAMIN MOORE &. CO., LIMITED 

(Formerly The Francis-Frost Co., Limited) 

NEW OFFICES AND WORKS : 
TORONTO JUNCTION, CANADA. 

New York. Chicago, Cleveland, Carterett. N.J. 



65 




11 A R D \Y A R E A X D M E T A L 



WE Cldim to give all round satisfaction to you and yOUT customers. 
BLACK DIAMOND Tarred Felt sells easily always. 

When once used the satisfaction is established, because every part of the paper is alive with quality. All our 
lines have the same strong pulling power, and you should get afttr this trade in your district. 

OUR WRAPPING PAPER HAS NO RIVAL ON THE MARKET. ASK FOR THE BRAND. 



Our Brands 



♦ 



Black Diamond 
Tarred Felt 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



Joliette and Cyclone 
Sheathing 



Alex. Mc Arthur (SL Co-, Limited, 



82 McGillSt. 
Montreal 



r. J. COX. Winnipeg, Sole A^ent fer Norlhi 



»t Provii 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



August 2, 1907 
These prices are for mien qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
in to make it perfectly accurate. 



METALS. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cooksons perlb 17 

Hallett's " ,0 * 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES. 

Plates.} to J inch, per 100 lb.. 2 40 2 50 

Heads, per 100 lb.... 2 60 2 75 

Tank plates 3-16 inch ........ 2 60 2 ,» 

Tubes per 100 feet. U inch .. 8 25 8 50 

'.'. ■• 21 " '.'■ 10 5J 11 00 

3 ' •■ .. 12 0- 12 50 

31 ' . . 15 00 16 00 

4 " .. 19 25 20 00 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 
Plain tinned and Spun, 25 rjer cent, off list. 
BABBIT METAL. 
Canada Met al Ctmpany-Irno. ™J.« en :»° e . 
80c; Imperial Tough. 60c; White Brass. 50c. 
Metallic 35c. ; Harris Heavy Pressure, 25c 
Hercules. 55c; White Bronze 15?- *»ar 
Frinionless, 14c; Alluminoid, 10c, No. 4, 
^ja^Robertson Co-Extra and genuine 
Monarch. 60c; Crown Monarch. 50c . No I 
Monarch 40c; KingMc ; ^'^J**- 
Thurher. 15c ; Philadelphia 12c ;Ca,adian, 
10c ; hardware, No. 1, 15c; No, 2. 12c, No. 3, 
10c. per lb. bras8 

Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 25 p.c. advanoe. 

Sheet*. 12 to 14 in. ••■••••••• xS 

Tubing, base, per lb 5-16 to 2 In ... . 33 

Tubing, J to 3-inch, Iron sipe size. . u Ji 

1 to 3-inch, seamless "» 

Copper tubing, 6 cents extra. 

COPPER. Per 100 lb. 

rating ingot ... 23(0 23 50 

Cut lengths, round, bars, | to 2 in... 35 w 

Plain sheets. 14 ox * «" 

Plain. 16 ox„ 14x48 and 14x60 .... 35 00 

Tinned copper sheet, base 38 "0 

Planished base ■■ « w 

Braziers' (in sheeU). »i6 ft., 25 
to 30 lb. each, per lb., base.. 34 U 35 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 
8 to 10 gauge 2 70 2 75 

W«*° IS leo' 

17 ■• ' '" 2 50 2 60 

\a •■ 2 50 2 10 

on •• 2 50 2 60 

M ■• '" 2 55 165 

04 •• 2 55 2 70 

« " '" .'.' 2 65 2 85 

28 ■« ;; 2 70 3 00 

CANADA PLATES 

Ordinary. 52 sheet* 2 7i 3 06 

All bright " 3 75 I Of 

Galvanized— Dom. Crown. Ordinary. 

18x24x52 4 45 4 35 

60 4 70 4 60 

20x28x80 890 8 70 

'J 40 9 20 



GALVANIZED SHEETS. Colborne 
Crown 
B W. Queen's Fleur- Gordon Gorbal's 
gauge Head de-Lis Crown Best 
lt> - 2U . . 3 95 3 80 3 95 

22 - 24 .. 4 20 4 05 4 00 4 05 

26 4 45 4 30 4 40 4 30 

28 4 70 4 55 4 60 4 55 

Less than case lots 10 to 25c extra. 
Apollo Brand. 

24 guage, American 3 85 

26 •' " 410 

28 " " 4 55 

lOJoz 4 85 

25c less for 1,000 lb. lots. 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Montreal. Toronto. 

Middlesboro, No. 1 pig iron. .21 50 24 50 

Mi.ldlesboro, No. 3 pig iron 20 50 23 50 

Summerlee, " ..25 50 24 50 
special " . 24 5U 
soft " ..24 00 

Carron 26 00 

Carron Special 24 50 

Carron Soft 24 00 

Clarence, No. 3 2150 23 50 

Glengarnoek, No. 1 27 00 

Midland, Londonderry and 
Hamilton, off the market 

but quoted nominally at 26 00 

Radnor, charcoal iron 32 00 34 CO 

Common oar, per 10U lb 2 20 2 30 

Forged iron ' 2 45 

Refined " " 2 60 2 70 

Horseshoe iron " 2 60 2 70 

Hoop steel, li to 3 in. base 2 80 

Sleigh shoe steel " .... 2 25 2 30 

Tire steel 2 40 2 50 

Best sheet cast steel 12 

B. K. Morton "Alpha" high speed. 65 

Colonial black diamond 08 11 09 

Sanderson's 08 45 

Jessop's standard 14 Oil 

ark high speed 60 60 

Leonard brand .... 08 08 

Jonas & Oolver's tool steel 10 20 

JowettiSonsB.P.L. foolstee' 101 11 

INGOT TIN. 
Lamb and Flag and StraitB— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $44 00 845 00 

TINPLATE8. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright 
M.L.S., Famous (equal Bradley) Per box 

I 0,14 x 20 base $6 50 

IX, 14x20 " 8 00 

IXX. 14x20base 9 50 

Ravea and Vulture GradeB— 

10, 14 x 20 base 5 00 

IX " 6 00 

IXX " 7 00 

I X X X " 8 00 

"Dominion Crown Best"— Double 

Coated, Tissued. Per box. 

10, 14x20 base 5 50 5 75 

I X, 14x20 " 6 50 6 75 

IXX x20" 7 50 7 75 

"Allaway's Best" — Standard Quality. 

I C, 14x20 base 4 65 5 00 

IX. 14x20 ' 5 40 5 75 

I XX, 14x20 " 6 15 6 50 

Bright Cokes. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.O., 14 x 20 base 4 25 4 35 

20x28, double box 8 50 8 70 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.O., 20x28, 112 Bheet* .... 7 25 8 00 
IX., Terne Tin 9 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxg.) 

" 14x60, " > .... 7 50 

" 14x65, " J 



Tinned Sheets. 
72x30 up to 24 gauge 



8 50 

9 f>0 



LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 5 50 

Bar, " ; 5 75 6 00 

Sheets, 2J lb. sq. ft., by roll 6 50 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 6 25 

Out Bheeta Jc. per lb., extra. 



SHEET ZINC 

5-cwt. casks 7 75 

Part caskB 8 00 



8 25 



ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 75 7 00 

Domestic 6 E0 6 75 

COLD ROLLED SHAFTING. 

9-16 to 11-16 inch 06 

J to 17-16 " 051 

17-16 to 3 " 05 

30 per oent. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

Dealers buying prices : 

Montreal Toronto 

Heavy copper and wire, lb. 17 16J 

Light copper 16 15 

Heavy red brass 151 15 

'■ yellow brass 12 12 

Light brass 084 08 

Tea lead 03J 04 

Heavy lead 04 04J 

Scrap zinc 03J 04 

No. 1 wrought iron 15 50 11 50 

"2 " " 6 OC 6 00 

Machinery cast Bcrap ... 17 00 16 50 

Stove plate 13 CO 12 00 

Malleable and steel 8 00 8 00 

Old rubbers 101 10 

Country mixed rags, 100 lbs. 100 125 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 

' BRASS OOOD8, VALVES, ETC. 

Standard Compression work, 57J per cent. 
Cushion work, discount 40 per cent. 
Fuller work, 70 per cent. 
Flatway stop and stop and waste cocks, 60 

per cent. ; roundway, 55 per cent. 
J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

45 ; Standard, 55 per cent. 
Kerr standard globes, angles and checks, 

special, 424 per cent.; standard, 474 p.c. 
Kerr Jenkins' disc, copper-alloy disc and 

heavy Btandard valves, 40 per cent. 
Kerr steam radiator valves, 60 p.c, and quick- 
opening hot-water radiator valves, 60 p.c. 
Kerr brass, Weber's straightway valves, 

4U; straightway valves, IB i;.M , 60. 
J. M. T. Radiator ValveB 50 ; Standard, 60 ; 

Patent Ouick - Opening Valves. 65 p.c. 
Jenkins' Valves Quotations on application 

to Jenkins' Bros., Montreal. 

No 1 compression Dam cock net 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No 7 Fuller's " 2 25 

No. 41, " " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, 1 er dcz $16.20 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

cock, No. 2208 25 

Square head brass cocks, 50 ; iron, 60 p.c. 
Tnompson Smoke-test Machine 25.00 

BOILERS— COPPER RANGE. 

Coppe*, 30 gallon, $33, 15 per cent. 

BOILERS — (lAI.VANI2K.li IRON RANOE. 

30-gallon, Standard, $5; Kxtra heavy, $7.75 



Size (per 100 ft.) 
i inch. 



Galvanized 

3 20 

3 20 

3 75 

5 00 

7 25 

9 90 

11 »0 

15 80 

26 00 

34 00 

42 75 

48 60 



BATH TUBS. 

Steel clad copper lined, 15 per cent. 

CAST IRON SINKS. 

16x24, $1; 18x30, $1; 18x36, $1.30. 

ENAMELED BATHS, ETC. 

List issued by the Standard Ideal Com- 
pany Jan. 3, 1907, shows an advance of 10 per 
cent, over previous quotations. 

ENAMELED CLOSETS AND URINALS 

Discount 15 per cent. 

HEATING APPARATUS. 

Stoves and Ranges — 40 to 70 per cent. 

Furnaces — 45 per cent. 

Registers — 70 per cent. 

Hot Water Boilers— 50 per cent. 

Hot Water Radiators— 50 to 56 p. 

Steam Radiators— 50 to 5> per cent. 

Wall Radiators and Specials— 50 to 55 p.c. 

LEAD PIPE 

Lead Pipe, 7c per pound, net list. 
Lead waste, 8c. per pound, net list. 
Caulking lead, 61c. per pound. 
Traps and bends, 40 per cent. 
IRON PIPE. 
Black. 
2 35 1 inch. 

I " 2 35 

4 " 2 90 

j " 3 90 

1 " 5 «0 1" 

1} " 7 65 1J 

11 " 9 20 l{ 

2 " 12 25 2 

21 " 20 10 21 

3 " 26 75 3 

31 " 34 25 31 

4 " 39 00 4 

Malleable Fittings— Canadian discount 30 per 

cent.; American discount 25 per cent. 
Cast Iron Fittings 571 . Standard bushings 
571.; headers, 571; flanged unions 571, mal- 
leable bushings 55 ; nlDtiles. 70 and 10 ; 
malleable lipped unions, 55 and 5 p.c 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 

Medium and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, 

up to 6 inch, 60 and 10 to 70 per cent. 
7 and 8-itj . pipe, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Light pipe, 50 p.c. ; fittings, 50 and 10 p.o. 

OAKUM. 
Plumbers ....per 10J lb 4 50 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American disoount 25 per cent. 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1-lb. toll perlb. 451 

2-lb. or over " 421 

solder. Per lb. 

Montreal Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 25 2( 
Wiping 22 23 



PAINTS, OILS AND QLAS 

BRUSHES 
Paint and household, 70 per cent.. 

CHEMICALS. 

In casks per lb. 
Sulphate of copper (bluestone or blue 

vitrol) 09 

Litharge, ground 06 

flaked 064 

Green conperas (green vitrol) 01 

Sugar of lead 118 

Lump olive 01 J 

COLORS IN OIL. 

Venetian red, 1-lb. tins pure 0>f 

Chrome yellow " .... 15 

Golden ochre " .... 10 

French " " 08 

Marine black .... 041 

Chrome green " .... 09 

French permanent green" .... 18 

Sign writers' black " ,,,, II 



5 00 



48 
46 



66 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLAUSS BRAND 

Fancy Oxidized Embroidery Scissors 
FULLY WARRANTED ~*^ 



Hand forged from finest steel. Pressed handles, hardened 
in water. 

Full crocus finish. Finely oxidized and nickel-plated 

The Clauss Shear Co,, 




Toronto, Ont 



OLIII. 

Domestic sheet 10 104 

Frenoh med»l 12 12$ 

PARIS HKFF.N. 

Berger'a Canadian 

600 lb. cask 274 

2501b. drums 28 27i 

100-lb. " 29J .... 

80-lb. " 29* 281 

1-lb. pkgs, 100 in box 30} 291 

%.lb. " 321 U 31} 

I -lb. tins. 100 in box 311 30} 

y,-lb. tins 33} 32 

PARIS WHITE. 
Inbbls 090 

PIOMENT8. 

Orange mineral, casks 0(8 

100-lb. kegs 085 

PREPARED PAINTS. 

Bam (In bbls.) 65 90 

Sherwin-Williamspaints, 1 55 

Canada Paint Oo.'s pure 140 

Standard P. k V. Co.'s " New Era." 1 30 

Benj. Moore Oo.'s "Ark" B'd 1 25 

" British Navy deck — 1 50 
Brandram- Henderson's "English" 1 45 

Ramsay's paints, Pure, oer gal 1 30 

Thistle, " .... 1 10 

Martin-Senour's 100 p.o. pure 1 55 

Senour'B Floor Paints 135 

Jamieson's "Crown and Anchor" 1 20 

Jamieson's floor enamel 150 

" Island City " paint 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's, pure 1 20 

Robertson's pure paints 1 20 

PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 60 

Bladders In bbls 1 85 

26-lb. tins 1 90 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 2 00 
Bulk in 100-lb. irons 1 80 

SHINGLE STAINS. 

In 5 gallon lots 85 90 

SHELLAC. 

White, bleached 2 65 

Fine orange 2 60 

Medium orange 2 55 

TURPENTINE AND OIL. 

Prime white petroleum 13 

Water white " ." 14J 

Pratt's astral " 18 

Castoroil 08 10 • 

Gasoline 224 

Benzine, per gal 17 20 

Turpentine, single barrels 79 80 

Linseed Oil, " raw.. 63 65 

boiled 66 68 

WHITE LEAD GROUND IN OIL. Per 100 lbB 

Canadian pure 7 15 7 50 

No. 1 Canadian 6 10 7 15 

Munro's Seleot Flake White 7 65 

Elephant and Deoorators'Pure 7 65 

Monarch 7 40 

Standard Decorator's 7 15 

Essex Genuine 6 80 

Brandram's B. B. Genuine 8 70 

" Anchor," pure 7 40 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 7 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 6 65 

"Crown and Anchor," pure 7 25 

Sanderson Pearoy's 7 40 

Robertson's O. P., lead 7 20 

RED DRY LEAD. 

Uemiine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt .... 6 25 

(Jenuine, 100 lb. kegs, " 6 50 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 6 00 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 6 25 

WINDOW GLASS 

Size United Double 

inches. Star Diamond 

Under 26 $4 25 $6 25 

26 to 40 4 65 6 75 

41 to 50 5 10 7 50 

51to60 5 35 8 50 

81to70 5 75 9 75 

71to80 6 85 11 00 

81 to 85 7 00 12 50 

S6to90 1500 

BJ to r>5 ,,, 17 SO 



96 to 100 20 50 

101 to 105 24 00 

100 to 110 27 50 

Discount — 16-oz.,25 per cent.; 21-oz. 30 per 
sent, per 100 feet. Broken boxes 50 per cent. 

WHITINO. 

Plain, in bbls 70 

Gilders bolted in bands 90 

WHITE DRY ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal, V.M 074 08 

WHITE ZINO IN OIL. 

Pure, in 25-lb. irons 

No. 1, " " 

No. 2, " " 

VARNI8HES. 

Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 

Pale durable body 

" hard rubbing 

Finest elastic gearing 

Flastic oak 

Funii nre, polishing 

Furniture, extra 

" No. 1 

" union 

Light oil finish 

Gold size japan 

Brown japan 

No. 1 brown japan 

Baking black japan 

No. 1 black japan 

Benzine black japan 

Crystal Damar 

No. 1 " 

Pure asphaltum 

Oilcloth 

Lightning dryer 

Klastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, eaoh. . 

Granitine floor varnish, per gal 

Maple Leaf coach enamels ; size 1, 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, gal., 

Canada Paint Cos sun varnish 

" Kyanize " Interior Finish 

" Flint-Lac," coach 

BH. Go's" Gold Medal," in oases 
Jamieson's Copaline, per gal 



084 


07. 


054 


cans. 


1 50 


3 50 


3 00 


3 00 


1 50 


2 00 


1 15 


90 


80 


1 4f 


1 80 


95 


95 


1 35 


90 


70 


2 80 


2 50 


1 40 


1 50 


70 


2 00 


2 50 


1 20 


2 50 


2 00 


2 40 


1 80 


2 00 


2 00 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE. 

BELLS. 

Brass hand bells, 60 per cent. 

Niokel, 55 per oent. 

GongB, Sargeant'e doorbells.. 5 50 8 Oil 

American, house bells, Der lb. 35 u 40 

Peterboro' door bells, 374 and 10 off new list. 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 

Carpet Felt per ton 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 

Dry Surprise 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 



Tar " " 400 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 

O.K.4I.X.L.... " 400 " 

Resin -sized " 400 ' 

Oiled Sheathing " 600 " 

Oiled " " 400 " 

Root Coating, in barrels per gal. 

Roof " small packages " 

Refined Tar per barrel 

Coal Tar 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 80 

Slater's felt per roll 

Heavy Straw Sheathing f. o. b. St. 

John and Halifax 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 
Wrought Iron, 70 per oent. 
Oast Iron Loose fin, 60 per cent. 
Wrought Steel Fast Joint and Loose Pin. 

70 per cent. 

CEMENT AND FIREBRICK. 

Canadian Portland 2 00 2 10 

Belgium 160 190 

White Bros. English 180 205 

" Lafarge " oement in wood 3 40 

" Lehign " Dement, In wood s 64 



2 25 
1 00 

1 25 

60 00 
40 00 
45 
40 
50 
55 
65 
70 

45 

1 00 
70 
17 
25 
5 00 
4 00 
15 
90 
70 

42 50 



.'.'Lehigh " cement, cotton sacks 2 39 

Lehigh cement, paper sacks 2 31 

*iro brick, Scotch, per 1,100 .... 27 00 30 0U 

English 17 oo 21 00 

American, low 23 25 00 

w . , ,_ " high 27 50 35 00 

Fire clay (Scotch), net ton 4 95 

Pavinx Blocks per 1,000. 
Blue metallic, 9"x4'"x3", ex wharf .. 35 00 
Stab e pavers, 12"x6"x2", ex wharf . . 50 00 
Stable pavers, 9"x4J"x3", ex wharf . . 36 00 

DOOR SETS. 

Peterboro, 37J and 10 per oent. 

DOOR 8PRING8. 

Torrey'sRod per doz 175 

l)oil,9 to 11 In " 95 165 

English. ......... " 2 00 4 00 

Chicago and Reliance Coil 25 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 
Peterboro, 371 and 10 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

Iron, discount 40 per oent. 
Brass, 45 per cent. 

HINGES. 

Blind, discount 50 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb. net. . 06 

5-in., " 0-J 

6-in., " 051 

" 8-in., " 05} 

.... _ ,' 10-in. and larger . . 05 
Light T and strap, discount 65 p.c. 
Screw hook and hinge- 
under J 2 in.... per 100 lb 4 65 

over 12 in " 3 65 

Crate hinges and back flaps, 65 and 5 p. c. 
Hinge hasps, 65 per cent. 

SPRING HINGES. 

Spring, per gro., No. 5. $17.50 No. 10, $18 ; 

No. 20, $10.80; No. 120, $20 ; No. 51, 

810 : No. 50, $27.50 
OhicagoSpring Butts and Blanks 12J percent. 
Triple End Spring ButtB 3c and b per cent. 
Chicago Floor Hinges, 374 and . off. 
Garden Pity Fire rtonse Hinges, 12J p.c. 
" Chief " floor hinge, 5J p.o. 

CAST IRON HOOKS. 

Bird oage per do.-. 

Clothes line, No. 61.. " 

Harness " 

Hat and coat ...:.... per gro. 

Chandelier per doz. 

Wrought hooks and staples— 

Jx5 per gross 

5-16x5 ft 

Bright wire hooks, 60 p 0. 
Bright steel gate hooks and staples, 40 p.c. 
Cresent hat and coat wire, 60 per cent. 
Screw, bright wire, 65 per cent. 



Door, japanned and N.P., doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. k L. 

screw per gross 1 30 2 00 

White door knobs per doz 2 00 

Peterboro knobs, 37J and 10 per cent. 
Porcelain, mineral and jet knobs, net list. 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian 40 to 40 and 10 per cen>. 

LOOKS. 

Peterboro. 37% and 10 per rent 
Runnel) * F.rwm. steel rim $2.50 rter do* 
Eagle cabinet locks, discount 30 per cent 
American tadlocks, all steel, 10 to 15 per 
cent.; all brass or bronze, 10 to 25 per cent. 

8AND AND EMERY PAPER. 

B. k A. sand, discount, 35 per oent 

Fmery, discount 35 per oent. 

Garnet (Burton's I 5 to 10 percent, advance 

SASH WEIGHTS. 



50 
00 

60 

1 10 
50 


1 10 

70 
12 0U 
10 00 

1 00 




2 65 

3 30 



Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 

Solid " 1 50 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 

BLIND AND BID STAPLIS. 

AlliUei per lb 071 



2 25 
1 75 

31 

JO 



WROUGHT STAPLES. 

Galvanized 2 76 

Plain . ' '_' 2 50 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

Bright spear point, 75 per cent, discouut. 



TOOLS AND HANDLES. 

_ ADZES. 

Discount 224 per cent. 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 60 per cent, off list. 
AXES. 

Single bit, per doz g CO 9(0 

Double bit, " 10 00 11 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes. 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 550 g 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 700 12 00 

Handli d Axes 7 00 9 00 

Red R ; lge, boys', handled 5 75 

hunters 5 25 

T • . BITS - 

Irwin s auger, discount 474 per cent. 
Gilmour s auger, discourt 60 per cent 
Rockford auger, discount 50 and 10 per oent. 
Jennings Gen. auger, net list. 
Gilmour s car, 474 per cent. 
Clark's expansive, 40 per cent. 

Clark's gimlet, per doz 65 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 

Nail ind Spike, per gross 2 25 

BUTCHERS CLEAVERS 

German ner doz. 7 00 9 00 

American " 13 QO 18 00 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

CHISELS. 

Warnock's, discount 70 and 5 percent. 
P. S. k W. Extra, discount, 70 per cent 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

3' £ K" *!?■ ? per pair 13 

S. k D.. " 5 •' n 111 

!&D " 6 " 0W 

Boynton pattern " 2U 

CROWIARS. 

3'/ic. to 4c. per lb. 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Coaoh ana Wagon, discount 75 and 5 pe> oent. 
Carpenters' disoount 75 peroeni. 

DRILLS. 
Millar's Palls, hand and breast, net list 
North Bros., each set, 50c. 

DRILL BITS. 
Morse, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 75 percent. 

Arcade 75 •• 

Kearney & Foot .' 75 •• 

Disston s 75 ■• 

American 75 " 

J. Barton Smith 75 ■■ 

McCleDan 75 •■ 

Eagle 75 •■ 

Nicholson ,;»;* •» 

Globe ..." 75 1 

Black Diamond. 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Jowitt's, English list, 274 per cent. 

GAUGES. 

Stanley '« discount 50 to 60 per cent. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 each 165 2 40 

HANDLES. 

Second growth ash fork, hoe, rake and 

► hov.l hmdle>, 40 p 0. 
Extra ash foik hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, ib p.c. 
Nn. 1 and 2 ash fork, hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, 50 n.<\ 
White ash whittietrees and neckyokes, 35 p c 
All other ash goods. 40 p c. 
All Ivckory, maple and osk goods, excepting 

carriage and express whitfletrees. 40 p c. 
Hickory, maple, oak carriage and eipress 

whittietrees, 45 p.c. 

GAMMERS. 

Maydoles, discount 5 to 10 per oent. 
Canadian, discounc 25 to 274 per cent. 

Magnetiotack per doz. 1 li] 120 

Canadian siwlge .... per lb. 07 Cgi 
Canadian hall pean, per lb. . - 93 25 



67 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MistaKes and Neglected Opportunities 

MATERIALLY REDUCE THE PROFITS OF EVERY BUSINESS 

Mistakes are sometimes excusable but there is no reason why you 
should not handle Paterson's Wire Edged Ready Roofing, Building 
Papers and Roofing Felts. A consumer who has once used Paterson's 
"Red Star" "Anchor" and "O.K." Brands won't take any other kind 
without a lot of coaxing, and that means loss of time and popularity 
to you. 

THE PATERSON MFG. CO., Limited, Toronto and Montreal 



HATCHETS. 

Oanadian, discount 40 to 42| per cent. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

2, " 4 80 

Barrel Underhill 5 05 

BOBS, 

Mortar, 50 and 10 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz. 1 25 1 5u 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian per doz. 5 50 6 00 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

Herman, 15 per cent. 
American discount, 334 per cent. 

PICE8. 

Per dozen ... 600 900 



Wood bench, Canadian. 40, American, 25 

Wood, fancy, 374 to 40 per cent. 

Stanley planes, $1.55 to $3 60, net list prices. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English per doz. 2 00 5 ft 

8tanley, 2| inch, single 24c, double 39c. 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, 371 to 40 per cent. 

Button's imitation perduz. 5 no 9 00 

Berg's wire fencing 1 72 5 50 

PCNCHEB. 

Saddler s per doz. 1 00 1 85 

Conductors " 3 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid perset .... 72 

" hollow per inch 1 00 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 37 J per cent. 

RULES. 
Boxwood, discount 70 per oent. 
[Tory, discount 20 to 25 per cent 



Atkins, hand and crosscut, 25 per cent. 
Disston's Hand, discount 124 Per cent 

Diaston's Crosscut per foot 35 55 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only each 50 125 

S. t D. solid tooth circular shingle, con- 
cave and band, 50 per cent ; mill and ice, 
drag, 30 per cent.; cross-cut, 35 per cent. ; hand 
saws, butcher. 35 per cent.; buck, New 
Century. $6.25; tuck No. 1 Maple Leaf, 
$5.25; buck, Happy Medium $4.25; buck, 
Watch Spring, 94.25 ; buck, common frame, 
$4.00. 

Spear 4. Jackson's saws— Hand or rip 26 in., 
$12 75; 21 in, $1>.25; panel. 18 in., $8.25; 
20 in $4; tenon, 10 m., $9.90; 12 in., $10.9j; 
14 in. $11.50. 

SAW SETS. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

X -Cut Set*. " 7 50 

Maple Leaf and Premiums saw sets, 40 off. 
S. k D. saw swages, 40 off. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz. 65 100 

North Bros., No. 30 ..per doz 16 80 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SQUARES. 

Iron, discount 20 per cent. 

Steel, discount 65 and l» per cent. 

Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 524 per cent. 



TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman'e each 90 2 85 

" steel each 30 8 00 

Berg's, each 75 2 50 

TROWELS. 

Disston's. discount 10 per cent. 
« k TV. discount SR Der cent. 

Berg's, brick. 924x11 4 00 

■' pointing, 924x5 2 10 



FARM AND GARDEN GOODS 

BELLS. 

American cow bells, 63$ per oent. 
Canadian, discouut 45 and 50 per cent. 
American, farm bells, each . . 1 35 3 UU 

BULL RINGS. 
Copper, $2.00 for 24-inch 

CATTLE LEADERS 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gran- 7 50 8 50 

BARN DOOR HANGERS 

itoz. pairs 

Stearns wood track 4 50 6 TO 

Zenith ... 9 00 

Atlas, steel covered 5 0) 6 00 

Perfect 8 00 11 00 

New Milo, flexible 6 50 

Steel, track, 1 x 3-16 in(100 ft) ... . 3 25 

" l}x3-16in(100ft) .... 4 75 

Double strap hangers, doz. Bets 6 40 

Standard jointed hangers, " 6 40 

Steel King hangers ' " 6 25 

StormKingandsafetyhangers 7 00 

" rail 4 25 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Bis Twin 
Hangers, 5 per cent. 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

50 and 10 per cent. 

8. & D. lawn rakes, Dunn's, 40 off. 

" sidewalk and stable scrapers, 40 off. 

PAY KNIVES. 

Net list. 

HEAD HALTERS. 

Jute Rope, 1-inch per gross 

» : I" :::: " 

Leather, 1-inch per doz. 

Leather, 11 " " • 

Web 

HOES. 

Garden, 53 and 10 per cent. 
Planter per doz. 4 00 

LAWN MOWERS 

Low wheel 12, 14 and 16-inch $2 30 

9-inch wheel, 12-inch 2 85 

14 " 3 cC 

16 " 3 124 

High wheel, 12 " 4 05 

14 " 4 50 

16 " 4 75 

SCYTHES. 

Perdoz.net 6 25 9 25 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per oent. 
SNAPS 

Harness, German, discount 25 per oent. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1100 

STABLE FITTINGS. 

Warden King. 35 per cent 
Dennis Wire & Iron Co., 33i p.c. 

WOOD HAY RAKES. 

40 and 10 per cent. 



HEAVY GOODS, NAILS, ETC. 



9 00 


. 10 00 


. 12 00 


4 00 


5 20 


2 45 



4 50 



10J 
09} 
11} 



ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over . . . 

Brook's. 80-lb. and over 

Taylor- Forbes, prospectors 05" 

Columbia Hardware Co., per lb 09i 

VISES. 

Wright's n ]S« 

Berg's, per lb 124 



Brook's 12f 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

B " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 5 00 

Blaoksmiths' (discount) 60 per cent. 

" parallel (dlsoount) 45 per oent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list Per cent. 

" " I and smaller. . 60, 10 and 10 

" " 7-16 and up . . .. 55 and 5 

" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 50 

Machine Bolts, I and less 60 and 10 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up.... 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 10 

Blank Bolts 55 

Bolt Ends 55 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, s and less . . 60 and 10 
" 7-16 and larger 50 and 5 

Coach Screws, conepoint 70 and 5 

Nuts, square, ad sizes, 4c. per cent, off 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4Ji . per cent, off 
Stove Rods per lb., 54 to 6c 
Stove Bolts, 75 per cent. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, per 100 lb. } in., $6.00; 5-16 in., 
$4.85 ; i in., $4.25 ; 7-16 in , $4.00; J in., $3 75; 
9-16 in. $3 7<': i in., $3 65; J in., $3 60 ; J in., 
$3.45; 1 in. $3.40. 

li ai'.. r, kennel and post chains, 40 To 40 and 
5 per cent ; uow ties, 4U per cent. ; Tie out 
ohains 65 per cent. ; Stall fixrurep, 35 per 
cent ; Trace chain, 45 per oent. ; Jack chain 
iron, 50 per cent. ; .lacs chain, urass, 50 per 
cent. 

HORSE NAILS 

M.R.M. cold forged process, list May 15,1907, 

50 and 5 per cent. 
"c;" brand, 574 per cent., off list . 
Capewell brand, quotations on application. 
HORSE8HOEB. 

M.R.M. brand: iron, light and medium 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; No. 2 and larger, 
$3.65 ; snow pattern No. 1 and smaller $4.15, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.90; "XL." new ight 
steel, No. 1 and smaller, $4 25 ; No 2 and 
larger, $4 ; "X. L" featherweight steel. No. 
to 4. $5 60; toe-weight, all sizes, $6.85. 
F.o.b. Montreal. Extras for packing. 

Belleville brand : No. and 1, light and 
medium iron. $3. 90; snow, »4.15; light steel, 
$4.25; No. 2 and larger, light and medium 
iron, $3.65; sn'.w. $3.93; light steel, $4. 
F.o.b. Belleville. Two per cent., 30 days. 

hORSE WEIGHTS. 

Taylor-Forbes, 4}c. per lb. 

NAILS. Cut. Wire. 

2d 4 00 3 50 

3d 3 15 3 20 

4 and 5d 2 90 2 90 

6and7d 2 80 2 80 

8and9d 2 65 2 65 

10andl2d 2 60 2 60 

16and20d 2 55 2 55 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 50 2 50 

F.o.b. Montreal. Out nails, Toronto 20c. 
higher. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 per cent 
Coopers' nails, discount 40 per cent. 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Pressed spikes, I diameter, per 100 lbs $3.15 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60, 10 and 10. 
Iron Burrs, discount 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
Copper Rivets, usual proportion burrs, 15 p 
Copper Burrs only, net list. » 

Extras on Coppered Rivets, }-ll> packages 

lc. per lb.; }-lb. packages 2c. lb. 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 4c. per lb. 

SCREWS. 
Wood, F. H., bright aud steel, 85 and 10 p.c. 

" R. H., bright, 80 and 10 pei cent. 

" F. H , brass, !• and 10 per cent. 

" R.'H., " 7ii and 10 per cent. 

" F. H., bronze, 70 and 10 per oent. 

" R. H., " 65 and 10 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 874 per cent. 
Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per oent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent 



MACHINE SCREWS. 
Flat head, iron and brass, 35 per cent. 
Felister head, iron, discount 30 per cent. 
" " brass, discount 25 per cent. 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 
Carpet tacks, blued 75 p.c. ; tinned, 80 
and 10; (in kegs), 40; cut tacks, blued, in 
dozens only, 75; \ weigh's, 60; Swedes 
cut tacks, blued and tinned, bulk, 75 
dozens, 75; Swedes, upholsterers', bulk, 85 
and 124; brush, blued and tinned, bulk, 70; 
Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and japanned, 
75 and 12* ; zino tacks, 35; leather carpet ; 
tacKs, 40 ; copper tacks, 25 ; copper nails 30 : 
trunk nails, black, 65 ; trunk nails, tinned ana 
blued, 65 ; clout nails, blued and tinned 65 ; 
chair nails, 35; patent brads, 40; fine finish 
ing. 40 ; lining tacks, in papers, 10 ; lining 
tacks, in bulk, IF ; lining tacks, solid heads. 

iD hulk, 75 ; saddle nails, in papers, If ; 

addle nails, in bulk, l» ; tufting button", 22 
Hue in do/ens only, 60; zino glaziers' point*, 
5; double pointed tacks papers,' 90 m.o >(' ; 
double pointed tacks, bulk, 40; clinch an<* 
du ik rivets, 46 ; cheese box t p cks, 85 and 5 
trunk tackB, 80 and 10. 

WROUGHT IRON WArHERS. 

Canadian make, discount 40 percent. 



SPORTING GOODS. 

CARTRIDGES. 
" Dominion " Rim Fire Cartridges and 
C.B. capB, 50 and i\ per ceni.; Rim Fire 
B.B. Round Caps 60 and 24 per cent; 
Centre Fire, Pi-tol and Rifle Cartridges 
30 p.c; Centre Fire Sporting and Military 
Cartridges, 2 J and 5 p.c; Rim Fire, Shot 
Cartridges, 5o and 7!4 p.c; Centre Fire, Shot 
Cartridges, 30 p.c; Primers, 25 p.c. 

LOADED SHELLS. 

"Crown" Black Powder, i5 and 10 p.c ; 
"Sovereign" Empire Bulk Smokeless Powder, 
30 and 10 p.c; 'Regal" Ballisiite Dense 
smokeless Powder, 30 and 5 p.c; "Imperial'' 
Empire or Ballistite Powder, 30 and 10 p.c 

EMPTY SHELLS. 

Paner Shells, 25 and 5; Brass Shells, 
5 and 5 p.c. 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

4-lb. bags $0 7U 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 29 
Best thiok white oard wads in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Ihin oard wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,010 

each, lOgauge 25 

Chemically prepared blaok edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge til 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 lu 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads in 
boxes of 250 each — 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 ■* I 66 

S and 9 " ■ 1 90 

SHOT. 
Ordinary drop shot. AAA to dust $7.50 per 
100 lbs. Discount 5 per cent ; cash discount. 
2 ner cent, 30 days ; net extraB as follows 
subject to cash discount only ; Chilled, 40 c; 
buck aod seal, 80c; no. 28 ball, $1 20 per 100 
lbs.; bags less than 25 lbs., 4c per lb ; K.O.K. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton. London. St. 
John and Halifax, and freight equalized 
thereon. 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 30 and 10 per oent. 
Game, Hawley k Norton, 50, 10 k 5 per oent 
Game, Victor, 70 per cent. 
Game, Oneida Jump (B. k L.) 40 k 24 p. 
Game, steel, 60 and 5 per oent. 

skates. 
Skates, disoount 37% per cent. 
Empire hockey sticks, per dos . . 3 00 



(>8 



\A/«*> maki 



HARDWARE AND METAt. 
loctric Fixtures, SooKots, 



nd Cut-Outa 




Electrical Supplies of" all kinds. 



MONTREAL. 



No Waste Circulation 



in HARDWARE AND METAL. Try 
the "want columns" and see. 



J 



CUTLERY AND SILVER- 
WARE. 
razors. per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 1100 

" KingOutter 13 50 18 50 

.Vade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Lewis Bros.' " Klean Kutter' 8 50 10 50 

Henckel'i 7 50 20 00 

Berg's 7 60 20 00 

Clauss Razors and Strops, 50 and 10 per cent 

KNIVES. 
Fartiers-Stacey Bros., do* 3 50 

PLATED GOODS 

Hollowware, 40 per cent, discount. 
Flatware, staples, 40 and 10, fancy, 40 and 5. 
Hutton's "Cross Arrow' flatware, 47%; 

"Singalese" and "Alaska" Nevada silver 

flatware, 42 p.c. 

SHEARS. 

Clauss, nickel, discount 60 per oent. 
Olauss, Japan, discount 674 per cent. 
Olauss, tailors, discount 40 per cent. 
Seymour's, disoount 50 and 10 per cent 
Berg's 6 00 12 00 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS. 

APPLE PARER8. 

Hudson, per doz., net 5 75 

BIRD CAGES. 

Brass and Japanned, 40 and 10 p. c. 

COPPER AND NICKEL WARE. 

Copper boilers, kettles, teapots, etc. 30 p.c. 
Copper pitts, 20 per cent. 

KITCHEN ENAMELED WARE. 

White ware. 75 per cent. 
London and Princess, 50 per cent. 
Canada, Diamond, Premier, 5n aiv 10 p c. 
Pearl, Imperial, Crescent and granite steel, 

30 and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
Star decorated steel and white, 25 per rent. 
Japanned ware, dhcouut 45 per cent. 
Hollow wire, tinned cast. 35 per cent. off. 

KITCHEN SUNDRIES. 

-n oyeners, per doz 'J 40 75 

Mincing knives perdcz 50 n 81 

Duplex mouse t raps, per doz 65 

Potato mashers, wire, per doz. . . 60 70 

'■ wood " . . aO 60 

Vegetable sheers, per doz 9 25 

Universal meat chopper ~S o. 1 115 

Enterprise chopper, each 1 30 

Spiders and fry pans, 50 per cent. 

Star Al chopper 5 to 32 1 35 4 10 

100 to 103 1 35 2 00 

Kitchen hooks, bright 60 

LAMP WICKS. 

Discount, 60 per cent. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

fling, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

METAL POLISH. 

Tandem metal polish paste 6 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head 40 I 00 

Tin and gilt, picture wire, 75 per cent 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. PotU, No. 55, polished. ...per set 90 

" No. 50. niokle-plated. " » 95 

" handles, japaned, per gross 9 2i 

" " nickled, " 9 75 

Common, plain 4 25 

" plated ■ W 

sbestos, per set 1 5J 

TINWARE. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE'. 

2in. plain or corrugated., per 100 feet, 

fl.SO; Sin., 94.40; 4 in., 95.80; 5 in., 97.45; 
in., 99.90. 

FAUCETS. 
Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVE TROUGHS. 
10-lnob per 100 ft. 3 30 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 

Discount off revised list, 35 per cent. 
Milk can trimmings, discount 25 per cent. 
Creamery Cans, 45 per oent 



LANTERNS. 

No. 2 or 4 Plain Cold Blast .... per doz. 6 50 

Lift Tubular and Hinge Plain, " 4 75 

No. 0, safety " 4 00 

Better quality at higher prices. 

•Tananning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

Prism globes, per doz., $1.20. 
OILERS. 

Kemp's Tornado and McClary e Model 
galvanized oil can, with pump, 5 gal- 
lon, per dozen 10 92 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent. 

Zinc and tin, discount 50 per cent 

Coppered oilers, 20 per cent. off. 

Brass oilers, 50 per cent, off. 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

PAILS (GALVANIZED). 

Dufferin pattern pails, 45 per cent. 

Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 

Galvanized washtubs 40 per cent 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 35 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flariug sap buckets, discount 35 per cent. 
6, 10 aud 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 35 per cen*\ 
Copner bottom tea kettles and boilers, 30 p.c. 
Coal hods, 40 per cent. 

'stamped ware. 
Plain, 75 and 124 Per oent. oif revised list. 
Ret.li.ned, 724 per oent revised list. 

SAP SPOUTS 

Rronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 

Eureka tinned steel, hookR 8 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 7 64 7 91 

7 inch " " ... 8 18 

Nestable, discount 40 per cent. 

STOVEPIPE ELBOWS 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 32 

7-inch " 1 48 

I'oliahed, 15o. per dozen extra. 

THERMOMETERS 

Tin case and dairy, 75 lo 75 and It) per cent. 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Per doz 3 n» 15 

Clauss, discount 35 peroen' 

TINNERS' TRIMMINGS. 

Discount. 45 per cent. 



WIRE. 

ANNEALED CUT HAY BAILING WIRE. 

No. 12 and 13, 94; No. 134, 94.10: 
No 14, $i.2"s No. 15. $4.50; in lengths 6' to 
11', 25 per cent.; other lengths 20c. per 10 J 
lbs extra ; if eye or loop on end add 25c. per 
luo lbs. to the above. 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS 

Discount K0 per cent. 

CL"THES LINE WIRE. 

7 wire solid line. No. 17 94.90; No. 
18, 93.00; No. 19, 92.70; r w j re golid line, 
No. 17. 94.45 : No. 18, J3.I0; No. 19, 92 81. 
All nrioesperlOOn ft m %»ur. ; 6 strand, No. 
18, 92 60 ; No. 19, S2 90. F •> b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Mnn"eal 

COILED 8PRIN" wirv 

High Carbon, No. 9, 92 95; No. 11, 93.50; 
No. 1?, 93.2J. 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE. 

Discount 374 per oent. 

FINE fTEEL WIRE. 

Discount 25 per cent List of extnas 
In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 95 — No. 18 
95.50 — No. 19, 96 — No. 20, 96.65 - No. 21 
97l-No. 22, 97.30 - No 23, 97,65 -No 
24, 98 - No. 25, 99— No. 26, 9950— No. 27, 
910-No. 28, 911-No. 29, 912-No. 30, $13- 
No. 31, 914— No. 32, 915— No. 33, 916— No. 34, 

tl7. Extras net^tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
2— Nos. 26-31, $4^Nos. 32-34, 96. Coppered, 
75c.— oiling. 10c.— in 25-lb. bundles, loo. — in5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25a— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c. 
—in 4-lb. hanks, 38o.— in J-lb. hanks, 50o.— 
packed in casks or cases. 15o.— bagging or 
papering, 10c 



VV.NOE STAPLES. 



Bri.ht 



2 80 



Galvanized ... .'2 



HAY WIRE IN COILS. 

No 13, $2.70: No. 14,92.80; No. 15, 92.95; 
f.o.b., Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE. 

Per 100 lb.- Nos. 4 and 5, 93.9C - 
Nos. 6, 7, 8, 93.3S — No. 9, 92.85 — 
No. 10. 93.41 -No. 11, 93.45 -No. 12, 93 00 
-No. 13, 93 10-Nn. 14. 93.95-No 15, 94.30 
—No. 16. S»4.30 from stock. Base sizes. Nos. 
6 to 9. 92.35 f.o.b. Cleveland. Extras for 
cutting. 

LIGHT STRAIGHTENED WIRE. 

Over 20 in. 

Gauge No. per 100 lbs. 10 to 20 in. 5 to 10 in. 

to 5 $0.50 $0.75 91.25 

6 to 9 0.75 1.25 2 00 

10 to 11 1.00 1.75 2 50 

12 to 14 1.50 2.25 3.50 

15 to 16 2.00 3.00 4.50 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. 

No. 0-9 gauge, 92.40; No. 10 gauge, 6c- 
extra: No. 11 gauge, 12c extra; No. 12 
gauge, 20c. extra ; No. 13 gauge, 30c. extra ; 
No 14 gauge. 40c. extra; No. 15 gauge. 55c. 
extra ; No 16 gauge, 70c extra. Add 6tc. 
for coppering and 92 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c, 
spring wire 91 25, bright soft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) 91. 25, packed in casks 
or cases 15c., bagging and papering 10c, 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c. in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb 
hanks, 50c, in 4-lb. hanks 75c, in }-lb. 
hanks 91. 

POfLTRY NETTING. 

2-ip. mesh, 19 w. g., 50 p.c Other sizes, 45 p c 

WIRE CLOTH 

Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolls. $1.72%. per 
100 sq. ft.; in 5u-ft. rolls $1.77%, per 100 sq ft. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 2 95 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 30 

Galvanized barb, f.n.K Cleveland -2 70 for 
small lots and 92.60 for oarlns 



WOOOENWfRE 

CHURNS. 

No. 0, $9 ; No. 1, $9 ; No. 2, $10; No. 3. 
$11; No. 4, $13 ; No, 5, 916.; f.o b. Toronto 
Hamilton, London and St. Marys, 30 and 30 
per cent.; fob. Ottawa, Kingston aud 
Montreal, 40 and 15 per cent, discount, 

OLOTBKS RKKIS. 

Davis Olothes Reels. dj«. 40 per cent. 

FIBRE WARE. 

Star pails, per doz $ 3 00 

Tuhs, " 14 00 

1 " " 12 01 

2 " " 10 CO 

3 " " 8 50 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 
3 to 6 feet. 12c per foot ; 7 to 10 ft., 13c. 
Waggoner Extension I. adders. dis. 40 per cent. 
MOPS AND IRONING BOARDS. 

" Best " mops 125 

'900 "mops 125 

Folding ironing toards 12 00 16 50 

REFRIGERATORS 

Discount, 40 per cent. 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 7 25 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, grained 
only, 4-in., style per doz. 7 55 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, light stair 
pel doz 9 55 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting per doz 60 00 

Square " ' 63 00 

Eclipse, per doz 54 00 

Dowswell " 39 00 

New Century, per doi 75 00 

Tlmisv 64 "" 

Stephenson 74 00 



WRINOBRH. 

Royal Canadian, 11 in., per doz 

•royal Amerioan. 11 in 

Eze* 10 in., per doe 



35 00 

35 It0 

36 75 



MISCELLANEOUS 

AXLE GREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 600 700 

Best quality 10 00 12 oo 

BELTING. 

Extra, 60 per oent. 

Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 p.c. 

Agricultural, Dot wider than 4 in., 75 per cent 

Lace leather, per side, 75c; cut laces, 80c. 

BOOT CALKS 

Small and medium, ball per M 4 25 

ftm all heel •' 4 50 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 100 150 

Bullard's " 6 50 

CASTORS. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cent. 
Plate, discount 524 'o 574 per cent. 

PINE TAR. 

4 pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

" " .... 9 60 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse perdu/. 55 100 

Axle " 22 33 

Screw " 22 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian olstern 1 40 2 00 

t'anadian niicher snout ... 1 80 3 16 
Berg'swing pump, 75 per cent. 

ROPE AND TWINE. 

Sisal 101 

Pure Manilla 15 

"British' Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-lfi inch and larger 21 23 

" 5-32 inch 25 27 

4 inch 25 28 

Russia Deep See 16 

Jute 09 

Lath Yarn, single 10 

" double 104 

Sisal bed cord 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 81 

■' 72 feet " 95 

Twine. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, S-ply 25 

4-nly 29 

Mattress twine per lb 33 45 

Staging " " 27 35 

BINDER TWINE. 

500 feet, sisal 09 

500 " standard o 09i 

550 " • " manilla Oil 

600 " " " 12: 

650 " " " 1C. 

Oar lots. }c less; 5-ton lots, Jc. less. 
Central delivery. 

SCALES. 

Gurney Standard, 35 ; Champion, 45 p.c. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne — Imperial 
Standard, 35 ; Weigh Beams, 35 ; Champion 
Scales, 45 

Fairbanks Standard, 30; Dominion, 50 
Richelieu, 50. 

Warren new Standard, 35 ; Champion, 45 
Weigh Beams, 30. 

STONES— OIL AND SCYTHE. 

Washita per b. 25 9 

Hindustan " 06 10 

slip " 18 30 

" Axe " .... 10 

Deer Creek " .... 10 

DeerUck " .... 25 

Axe " .... 15 

Lily white " .... 43 

Arkansas " .... 150 

Water-of-Ayr ' o 10 

Scythe per gros* J 50 5 00 

Grind, 40to2001b.,perton 20 00 22 00 

" under 40 lb., '' 34 00 

1 200 lb. and over 38 00 



6 9 



IT \RDWARE AND METAL 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



American Exporter 16 

American Shearer Co 10 

American Sheet and Tinplate Co 1 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Oo J9 

Atkins, K. C. S Oo 12 

Atlas Mfg. Oo ij 

B 

Baglan Hay Tin Plate Co 55 

Bauwell Hone Wire Fence Oo 24 

Barnett, (I t U. Co outside back cover 

Barry Bros 59 

Beard" ood Agency 16 

Bowser, s P , 4 Co , Limited 63 

Brandram- Henderson, Limited 62 

Bruit ford Rooting Co 17 

Buffalo Mfg. Co J3 

Burman \ Sons Ltd -5 

Burr Mfg. Co 20 

o 

Canada Foundry Co 18 

Canada llor»e Nail Co 28 

Canada lion Furnace Co 55 

Canada Metal Oo 29 

Canada Paint Oo . 64 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works 60 

Canadian Copper Co 55 

Canadian Furbanks Co 9, 2b 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 15 

Capewell Horse Nail Co 30 

Carriage Mountings Co 23 

Oaverhill. Learmont A Co 7,31 

Chicago Spring Butt Co 1 

Claim Shear Oo 67 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 58 

Contract Racard 18 

Consumers' Cordage Co 4 

Covert Mfg. Oo 29 

D 

Davenport, Pickup & Co 18 

Davidson. Thos., Mfg. Oo 4 

Defiance Mfg Co 59" 

Dieckmann, Ferdinand 58 

Dods, P. D 63 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co 23 

Dorken Bros 24 

DowsweU Mfg. Oo 10 



Erie Specialty Oo . 



. . inside back cover 



Kerrosieel Company 17 

Fornian, John .' 55 

I'rsyth Mfg Co 21 

Forwell Foundry Oo 29 

Fox. C. H 29 

Frothingham A Workman 6 



Gait Art Metal Oo 15 

Gibb, Alexander 28, 65 

Gllbertton, W., A Oo 60 

Greening, B.. Wire Oo 21 

Oreenway, Win. () 24 

Qaelpta Spring A Axle Co 15 

Gurney Foundry Co... 19 

Gutta Percha A Rubber Mfg. Co 

outside back cover 

H 

Huiover Portland Cement Co 12 

Harrington A Richardson Arms Oo 11 

Harris.J. W., Oo 72 

Hart A Cooley 17 

Heinisch, R.. Sons Oo 51 

Hohbs Mfg. Oo 26 

Hopkins A Allan Arms Co 13 

Howland, H. S., Mona A Oo 5 

Hutton, Jas., A Co 47 

Hutton, Win., & Sons, Ltd 29 

Hyde, F. A Oo 20 



Imperial Varnish and Color Co 60 

J 

James A Reid 12 

Jamieson, R. C, AOo 61 

Jardine, A. B.. A Oo 15 

Jenkins A Hardy 29 

Johnson s. Iver. Arms and Cycle Works 55 

Jones Register Co •. . 17 



Kanda A Co 13 

K«ui|j Mtg. Oo 30 

Kerr Engine Oo 21 



Lamplough, F. W A Oo 25 

Leslie, A. C, A Oo 55 

Lewis Bros., Limited 3 

Lewis, Rioe, A Son inside front cover 

Lockerby A MoComb 12 

I-ondon Foundry Co 9 

London Rolling Mills 1] 

Lucas, John 63 

Lufkin Rule Oo inside back cover 

LyBaght, John outside front cover 

Mo 

MoArthur, Alex., A Oo 66 

MoOaskill, Dougall A Oo 26 

MoClary Mfg. Oo 19 

MoDougall, R., Co 72 

McGlashan-Clarke Co., Ltd 29 

M 

Majestic Polishes 29 

Maple City Mfg. Co 27 

Maxwell, David A Sons 10 

Martin-Senour Oo 65 

Metal Shingle and Siding Oo 27 

Metallio Roofing Oo 51 

Milieu, John A Son .... outside back cover 

Mitchell, H. W 29 

Mitchell Self Testing Code Co 15 

Moore, Benjamin, A Co 65 

Morrison, James, Brass Mfg. Co 21 

Morrow, John, Screw, Limited 51 

MunderlohAOo 69 

N 

Newman, W. , A Sons 12 

Nicholson File Oo 71 

North Bros. Mfg. Oo 1 

Wovr ftcntia Sfflel and Ooal Oo 55 

Novelty Mfg. Co 25 



Oakey, John, A Sons 55 

Oneida Community .... inside back covar 

Ontario Lantern A Lamp Co 23 

Ontario Steel Ware Co 11 

Ontario Tack Co 65 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Oo . . 12 

Orford Copper Co 55 

Oshawa Steam A Gas Fittings Oo 20 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 18 



Patersoo Mfg. Oo 48 

Pelton, Godfrey 8 61 

Penberthy Injector Oo 12 

Peterborough Look Oo 10 

Pink, Thos 2 



Quean City Oil Co. 



20 



Ramsay, A., A Son Co 63 

Robertson, James Co. . . . inside back cover 

Roper. T. H 18 

Ross Rifle Co 72 

Round. John, & Son 14 

8 

Samuel, M. A L, Benjamin, A Oo 2 

Sanderson, Pearcy A Co 61 

Seycoiir, Henry T., Shear Co 26 

Sharratt A Newth 60 

Sherwin-Williams Co 57 

Shurly A Deitrich 8 

Simonds Canada Saw Co 17 

Simonds Mfg. Co 20 

Stairs, Son & Morrow 71 

Standard Ideal Co i \>, 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works... 61 

Standard Sanitary Oo 16 

Stephens, O F.ftOo 52 

Sterne, G. F. . A Co 20 

Stewart, 'amen. Mfg. Co 15 

Still, J. H , Mfg 13 



Taylor-Forbes Co outside front cover 

Thompson. B. A R H.Oo. outside back cover 
Toronto -md Belleville Roll ng Mills. . . 24 
Turner Brass Works : 29 

w 

Waggoner Ladder Oo 19 

Western Wire Nail Oo It 

Wilkinson, Hey wood A Clark 63 

Winnipeg Paint and Glass Oo 53 

Wright. E. T., A Oo 61 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Alabastine. 

Alabastine Co., Limited, Paris, Ont. 

Auditors. 

Davenport, Pickup A Co., Winnipeg. 

Automobile Accessories. 

Canada Cycle A Motor Co., Toronto 

Junction. 
Carriage Mountings Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Awnings. 

Tobio Tent and Awning Co., Ottawa 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal. 
Frothingham A Workman, Montreal. 
Robertson, Jas. Co,. Montreal. 

Bar Urns. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.V. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, NY. 
Carriage Mountings Co., Ltd , Toronto. 
Forsyth Efg. Co., Buffalo. NY. 
Ontario Metal Novelty Co., Toronto 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. 

Toronto. 
Sadler A Ha worth Toronto. 

Bicycles and Accessories. 

Johnson s. Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 
Fitc.hburg, Mass 

Binder Twine. 

Consumers Cordage Co., Montreal. 

Bolts. 

Toronto A Bellevilla Rolling Mills, 
Belleville. 

Box Strap. 

3. N. Warminton, Montreal 

Brass Goods. 

Frothingham A Workman, Montreal. 
Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland. Ohio. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Lewis, Rice, A Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
Mueller Mfg. Co., Decatur 111. 
Penberthy Injector Co.. Windsor, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph, Ont. 

Bronze Powders. 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works, Mon- 
treal. 

Brushes. 

United Factories, Toronto. 

Cans. 

Acme Can Works, Montreal. 

Builders' Tools and Supplies. 

Covert Mig. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Frothingham A Workman Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. 8. Sons A Co., Toronto. 



Hyde, F., A Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros. & Co. , Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, A Son, Toronto. 
Lockerby A McComb, Montreal. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Newman A Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mig. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stanley Rule A Level Co., New Britain. 
Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Stephens, G. F., Winnipeg. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Carriage Accessories. 

Carriage Mountings Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Covert Ml(s. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 

Carriage Springs and Axles. 

Guelph Spring and Axle Co., Guelph. 

Carpet Beateas. 

Ontario Metal Novelty Co., Toronto. 

Cartridges. 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 

Cattle and Trace "Chains. 

Greening. B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

ChaBng Dishes. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Churns. 

DowsweU Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mig. Co.,Nashua,N.H 

Clothes Reels and Lines. 

Hamilton Cotton Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 

Clutch Nails. 

J. N. Warminton. Montreal. 

Congo RooSng 

Buchanan Foster Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cordage. 

Consumers' Cordage Co.. Montreal. 

Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 
Cork Screws. 

Erie Speoialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Cow Ties 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton 
Cuspidors. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo. N.Y. 

Cut Glass. 

Phillips, Geo., A Co., Montreal. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., A Son Co., Ottawa. 
Claims Shear Co., Toronto 
Dorken Bros. A Co.. Montreal. 
Frothingham A Workman Montreal. 
Heinisch's. R., Bonn Co., Newark. N.J. 
Howland, H. S. Sons A Co., Toronto. 
Hutton, Wm., A Sons, Ltd., London, 

Eng. 
Lamplough, F. W., A Oo., Montreal. 
Phillips, Geo., A Co., MontreaL 
Round, John, A Son, MontreaL 



Electric Fixtures. 

Canadian General Electrio Co.. Toronto. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh A Co., Montreal. 

Electro Cabinets. 

Cameron A Campbell Toronto. 

Euameled Ware 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Engines, Supplies, etc. 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

Eavetroughs 

Wheeler A Bain, Toronto 

Fencing— Woven Wire 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Owen 

Sound. 
Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Co., 

Hamilton. 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co.. G. A H., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Nicholson File Co., Port Hope 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington A Richardson Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Johnson's, Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

FUbing Tackle. 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Akron, Ohio 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lamplough, F. W., & Co., Montreal. 
Shirreff Mfg. Co., Brockville, Ont. 
Furnaces. 
Pease Foundry Co , Toronto. 

Galvanizing. 

Canada Metal Co.. Toronto. 
Dominion Wire Mig. Co., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Wind Engine A Pump Co., 
Toronto. 

Glass Ornamental 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto 

. Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Gibsone, J. B., Montreal. 
Pelton, Godfrey 8. 
Sharratt A Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw. A., A Son, London, Eng. 

Handles. 

Still, J H., Mfg. Co. 

Harvest Tools. 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co , Tillson- 
burg Ont. 

Hoekey Sticks 

Still, J. H. Mfg. Co., St. Thomas. 

Hoop Iron. 

Frothingham A Workman, Montreal. 



Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
J. N. Warminton, Montreal. 

Horse Blankets. 

Heney, E. N., A Co., Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills. Montreal. 
Capewell Horse Nail Co., Toronto 
Toronto A Belleville Rolling Mills 
Bellevi le. 

Hot Water Boilers and Radi- 
ators. 

Cluff, R. J.. A Co Toron'o. 
Pease Foundry Co. Toronto. 
Taylor- Forbes Co., Guelph. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North BroB. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Injectors — A utomatic. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Iron Pumps. 

Lamplough, F. W., A Co., Montreal. 
McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wright, E. T., A Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Birkett, Thos.. A Son Co., Ottawa. 
Frothingham A Workman, Montreal. 
Maxwell, D., A Sons, St. Mary's, Ont. 
Taylor. Forbes Co.. Guelph. 

Lawn Mower Grinders 

Root Bros. A Co., Plymouth, Ohio. 

Ledgers — Loose Leaf. 

Business Systems, Toronto. 
Oopeland-Ohatterson Oo , Toronto. 
Grain, Kolla L , Co.. Ottawa. 
Universal Systems, Toronto. 

Lithographing. 

London Printing A Lithographing Co., 
London, Ont. 

Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
National Hardware Co., Orillia, Ont. 

Lumbermen' s Supplies. 

Pink, Thos., A Co., Pembroke Ont. 

Lye 

GiUett, E. W.. A Co., Toron 



70 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Manufacturers Agents. 

Fox.O. H., Vancouver. 
Mcintosh, U. F., 4 Co., Toronto. 
Uibb, Alexander, Montreal. 
Hoi.lt. Bathgate 4 Co., Winnipeg. 

Metals. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Eadie. H. G., Montreal. 

Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal. 

Qibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Kemp Mfg. Co.. Toronto 

LeBlie, A. C, * Co., Montreal. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Roberts ,n. Jas., Co., Montreal 
Roper, J. H., Montreal. 
Samuel, Benjamin* Co., Toronto. 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifai. N.S. 
Thompson. B. & S. H. 4 Co. Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co., Preston, 
Ont. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Oakey, John, 4 Sons, London, Eug. 
Nails Wire 
Dominion Wire Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

Oil Tanks 

Bowser. S. P., 4 Co., Toronto. 

Ornamental Iron and Wire, 

Denn s Wire 4 Iron Co , London, Ont. 

Packing. 

Gutta Parcha 4 Rubber Co. Toronto 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Glass. 

Blanchite Process Paint Co., Toronto. 
Brandram-Henderson, Montreal 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Oil Co. Toronto 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Torouto. 
Do Is, P. D., & Co., Montreal 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto 
Jamieson, R. 0.. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lucas John 4 Co., New York 
McArthur, Corneille 4 Co., Montreal. 
MoCaskill, Dougall 4 Co., Montreal. 
Moore. Benjamin, 4 Co. Toronto. 
Ottawa Paint Wor<*s, Ottawa 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay 4 Son, Montreal 
Sanderson ' earcy4 Co., Toronto 
Sherwin-Williams Co.. Montreal. 
Standard Paint Co., Montreal 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works 

Windsor, Ont. 
Stephens 4 Co., Winnipeg. 
Martin-Senour Co.. Montreal 
Winnipeg Paint 4 Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B , Wire Co., Hamilton. 



Plumbers' Tools and Supplies. 

Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
ClutT. R. J., 4 Co., Toronto 
Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal. 
Glauber Brass Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Jardine, A. B., 4*Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Jenkins Bros., Boston. MasB. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Torouto. 
MerreU Mfg. Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
Mi ntreal Rolling Mills Montreal. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Mueller, H., Mfg. Co., Decatur, 111. 
Oshawa Steam 4 Gas Fitting Co.,Oshaw 
Robertson Jas., Co. Montreal. 
Robertson, Jas., Co., Limited, Toronto 
Sonierville, Limited, Toronto 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., Port Hope, 
Standard Sanitary Co., Pittsburg. 
Stephens, G F., 4 Co.. Winnipeg, Man. 
Turner Brass Works, Chi, ago. 
Vickery, Orlando, Toronto. 

Polishes. 

Majestic Polishes. Toronto 

Portland Cement. 

International Portland Cement Co. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 
Hyde, F., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Thompson B. 4 S. H. 4 Co., Montreal. 

Poultry Netting. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Printing. 

London printing 4 Lithographing Co., 
London, Ont. 
Razors. 

Clause Shear Co., Toronto. 
Refrigerators. 

Fabien, 0. P., Montreal 

Registers 

Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Roohng Supplies. 

Brantf ord Roofing Co. . Brantf ord. 
Barrett Mfg. Co., New York. 
F. W. Bird, EaBt Walpole, Mass. 
Buchanan Foster Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
McArthur, Alex., & Co., Montreal 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co. .Preston, Out. 
Metallio Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto 4 Montreal. 
Wheeler and Bain, Toronto 

Saws. 

Atkins, E.G., 4 Co., Indianapolis, Ind 
Shurly 4 Dietrich, Gait, Ont. 
Spear 4 Jackson, Sheffield, Eng, 

Scales. 

Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal. 

Screw Cabinets. 

Cameron 4 Campbell, loronto. 



Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co , Montreal. 
M unreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 

So i7 Pipe 

McFarlane, Walter, Glasgow 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamiltor 
Hyde, F., 4 Co., Montreal. 

Shelf Boxes. 

Cameron 4 Campbell, Toronto. 

Shears, Scissors. 

Clauss Shear Co., Toronto. 

Shovels and Spades. 

Eclipse Mfg. Co., Ottawa 
Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal. 
Pcterboro Shovel 4 Tool Co., Peterboro. 

Silverware. 

Huttop, Wm., 4 Sons, Ltd., London, 

Eng. 
McUlashan, Clarke Co., Niagara Fal s, 

Out. 
Phillips, Geo., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Round, John, 4 Son, Sheffield, Eng. 

Skates. 

Canada Cycle 4 Motor Co., Toronto. 
McFarlane, Walter, GlaBgow. 

Sprayers 

Cavers Bros., Gait 

Spring Hinges, etc. 

Chicago Spriug Butt Co., Chicago, 111. 

Stable Fittings 

Dennis Wire 4 Iron Co., Loudon 

Steel Rails. 

Nova Scotia Steel 4 Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stove Pipe. 

Chown, Edwin, and Son, Kingston 

Stoves, Tinware, Furnaces 

Canadian Heating 4 Ventilating Co. 

Owen Sound. 
Copp, W. J„ Sod 4 Co., Fort William 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal 
Down Draft Ftirnaoe Co., Gait 
Guelph Stove Co., Guelph. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Howard, Wm., Toronto 
Kemp Mnfg. Co. Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co. London. 
Merrick Anderson, Winnipeg 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Smart, James, Mfg. Co., Brockville 
Stewart, Jas., Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph. Ont. 
Wright, E. T.,4 Co., Hamilton. 



Tacks. 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton. 

Tents. 

Tobin Tent and Awning Co., Ottawa 

Tin Plate. 

American Sh-et .4 Tin Plate Co., Pitts- 
burg, I'a, 
Baalan Bur Tin Plata <'■>, Briton Ferry 

oouth Wales 
Ly agnt, John, Bristol, Newport ami 
Uontreal 

Turpentine 

Defiance mi i d . Toronto, 
Ventilators. 

Harris, J. W, Co , Montreal. 
Pearson, Geo. D., Montreal. 

Wall Paper 

Staunton Limited Toronto. 

Wall Paper Cleaner. 

Gilbert, Frank U. S., Cleveland 

Washing Machines, etc 

Dowswell Mfg. Co.. Hamilton, frnt 
The Shultz Bros. Co., Brantford. 
Taylor Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Water Filters. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Wheelbarro ws 

London Foundry Co., London Ont. 
Schultz Bros. Co., Ltd., The B rantford. 
Wholesale Hardware 
Birkett, Thos., 4 Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Caverhilt, Learmont 4 Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal. 
Hobbs Hardware Co., Ixmdon. 
Howland, H. 8.. Rons 4 Co.. Tornn'n. 
Lamplough, F. W., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Broa. 4 Co., M ont real. 
Lewis, Rice. 4 Son, Toronto. 

Window and Sidewalk Prism* 

Hobba Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc 

Banwell-Hoxie Fence Co., Hamilton 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfv. Co., Montreal 
Greening, B., Wire Co.. Hamilton. 
Owen Sound Wire F ence Co., Jweu 

Sound 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Western Wire 4 Nail Co., London, Ort. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Alez., 4 Co , Montreal. 
Stairs. Son 4 Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 

Wringers 

Connor, J. H.4Son, O awa, Out 



Wrought Iron Pipe and Cast Iro n Fittings 

Our Stock in these lines is complete. 
Can fill all orders promptly. Be sup- 
plied before the Spring rush commences. 



WM. STAIRS, SON & MORROW, Limited, HALIFAX, N.S. 



WELL KNOWN BRANDS MADE IN CANADA BY 

AMERICAN j ^^^~ ^y^s. S ~Y / 

ARCADE /m /C // // " v t ^V^A^f 



KEARNEY and 
FOOT 

McCLELUN 




GREAT 
WESTERN 

J. B. SMITH 



Dominion Works, 



'ort Mop< 



On-t. 



HAP n\V \ R E \ \ T D MET A L 



"Seeing is Believing" 

IJ As the Ross Sporting Rifle represents the best in modern 
ritie manufacture, the highest grade materials and minute 
accuracy in workmanship, it is to your interest to learn fully 
about this Canadian Rifle — 

If The Ross Straight Pull 3o3 Sporting Model M is one of 
our leaders to retail at $26. The barrel is the celebrated 
Ross high pressure, non-fouling, gun-barrel steel — The 
breech action is dependable. 

Our representatives are now demonstrating the merits 
of this rifle — It places you under no obligation to drop 
us a line to make sure you will be on their calling list. 



Our advertising policy is co-operative. 



THE ROSS RIFLE CO., 



Q UEBEC 



McDOUGALL PUMPS ARE 
STANDARD PUMPS 

We are going to make the 
above expression known over 
the whole civilized portion of 
this good old world and inci- 
dentally educate a few heathen 
tribes into the bargain. We 
will do this by "Delivering the 
Goods" and nothing better in 
the Pomp way is procurable anywhere. We have 
them for all duties and the price is in your favor. 

Quality first, however. 
THE 

R. McDOUGALL CO., Ltd. 

6ALT, CANADA 




Chances for Business 



In these days of prosperity large 
public buildings are constantly being 
planned in all parts of the country. 

These are your chances for getting 
business. 

c Good air is a necessity in all build- 
ings, but more especially in those built 
for public use. 

The best way to get good air is by 
the use of our 

AEOLIAN VENTILATORS 

They have been tried all over 
Canada, and have never failed to give 
complete satisfaction. 

Montreal, June 15th, 1903 
Messrs. J. W. Harris Co., Limited, Montreal. 
Dear Sirs, 
In answer to your request, we take very much 
pleasure in saying that we have your system of ven- 
tilation installed in our Church for several years 
and it has given us entire satisfaction. 

Fre. MARIE RAYMOND, O.F.M. 

Write us for terms. 

THE J. W. HARRIS COMPANY, LIMITED the aeolian ventilator 




Contractors 



Montreal 



(Can be supplied in cop- 
per, if so desired.) 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ROBERTSON'S 
SOLDERS 

Bar-King, Strictly Merchant's, 
Wire (any gauge) Tri- 
angular, Oval, Plumbers' 
and Canners' Solders, 
Electricians' Solder 

ARE STANDARD 



Ask Quotations 



The 



James Robertson Co., umited 

144 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 



A CHAIN 



of REASONS 



IN APPEARANCE the moat attractive, in uae toe 
-** smoothest and moat flexible ana in construction the 
strongest of their kind on the market are the 

AMERICAN ifjf 

By meana of our patented Lock Ring you can adjust 
the loop to any aize and it locks fast. No slipping is 
possible, in spite of any pull or strain. The Snap is the 
most durable and effective made, never (ticking on account of 
nut. 

MADE IN ALL SIZES EROM DOG LEADS OP. 



ONEIDA 
COMMUNITY 

Limited 




NIAGARA 
FALLS "" 
Ontario 




Qui.! 




f (JFfCJN MEASURING TAPES 

^ Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 



Pat, Leather, Bend Leather, Etc 



ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 



LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 



Canadian Factory 

London Office and Warehouse— 24 and 26 Holborn. 



Windsor, Ontario 

New York City Branch— 280 Broadway. 



For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



-Kfr ^ W 



Eat. 1S68 




Inc. 1895. 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ^*s>t^^^!*** Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

international Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



Copy of cata- 
logue sent free 
to any Inter- 
ested file user 
upon applica- 
tion. 




SHEET ZING 
ZINC SPELTER 
INGOT TIN 
INGOT COPPER 



We can quote lowest market prices for immediate 
shipment from stock Montreal. 



'Redstone'' 

High Pressure 

Sheet Packing 

A packing that will hold. For use in highest 
pressures for steam, hot or cold water and air. 
Packs equally well for all. 

From actual tests, we believe that this pack- 
ing is the most durable and satisfactory of any on 
the market. Try a sample lot and see for yourself. 

Manufactured Solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

of TORONTO, LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES, 

47 Yonge Street, Toronto. 

Branches : Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



We are Headquarters 

F"OFR 



Automobile and Gas Engine Supplies 

(CATALOGUE B.) 

and Motor Boat Fittings 




LIMITED 



Metals, Hardware, Chemicals, etc., etc. 

381 and 383 St. Paul St., Montreal 



(CATALOGUE C.) 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUES. 



We have just issued our Mid-summer Bargain 
Sheet— every man in the trade should have a copy. 



JOHN MILLEN & SON 



Limited 



321 St. James St. 
MONTREAL 



132 Bay Street 
TORONTO 



CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Also in Great Britain, United States, West Indies, South Africa and Australia. 

HARDWAK§™METAL 

A Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 

Office of Publication, 10 Front Street East, Toronto. 



VOL. XIX. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, AUGUST 10, 1907 



NO. 32. 



Quality 

and 

"Queen's Head" 

always go together. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO. Lid , MONTREAL 
Bristol, Newport and Montreal Managers, Canadian Branch. 




PEPPERCORN^DIAMOND 

TJJN, TRADE MARK f C 



Canadian Agents: DORKEN BROS. & CO, MONTREAL. 



Money For You In 
"Sovereign" Radiators 

The Wise Dealer stocks and recommends the lines 
which pay him well. This explains why so many 
dealers talk 

"SOVEREIGN" 
RADIATORS 

so persistently. "Sovereign" Radiators not only reap a 
comfortable profit for the dealer but they also secure 
his reputation. In conjunction with the "SOVEREIGN" 
BOILER they mean perpetual satisfaction as far as 
heating is concerned. 

Do you know what the SOVEREIGN HEATING 
SYSTEM means to you in actual cash? Let's tell you. 

TAYLOR-FORBES COMPANY, Limited 

Head Office and Works : GUELPH, ONT. 

Toronto-1088 King St. West. Montreal '—122 Craig St. West. 
Winnipeg—The Vulcan Iron Works, Limited. 

See Classified List of Advertisements on Page 66. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




QEn FOOD 
CHOPPER 



A modern household utensil that is needed 
in- every kitchen. Carefully made, nicely 
tinned, self-cleaning, self-sharpening. It has 
steel cutters, and is made in four sizes. 







No. 16 capacity I lb. per minute 
No. 20 " 2 lbs. 
No. 22 " 2h lbs. " 
No. 24 " 3 lbs. 



(i 



Gem Food Choppers chop all 
kinds of Raw or Cooked Meat, 
Fish, Clams, Oysters, Vege- 
tables of all kinds, Fruit, Bread, 
Crackers or Cheese, and many 
other articles used in making 
substantial dishes and dainty 
desserts. It is more useful than 
a chopping bowl and a great 
deal handier. It may be easily 
clamped to the kitchen table 
and is ready for use whenever 
needed. 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LlfllTED 



TORONTO. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you have to do a 

CREDIT BUSINESS 



why not make it as 
easy and convenient 
as possible ? 

THE 
CRAIN 
MONTHLY 
ACCOUNT j 
SYSTEM ' J 

is designed especi- j 
ally for (he retail If 
trade. It will cut 
your bookkeeping in 
half; accounts are 
always ready. 
We manufacture 
and devise sys- 
tems for any kind 
of business. 

Write us for Cata- 
logue " E," which 
will give you all in- 
ormatlon. 




THE ROLLA L CRAIN CO., Limited 

OTTAWA, CANADA 

Branches— TORONTO, 18 Toronto Street ; MONTREAL, 28 Alliance Bldg., 
WINNIPEG, 11 Nanton Block. 




BRILLIANT 
ILLUMINATION 



of our Canadian cities 
owes much to 

ONEIDA GALVANIZED 
CHAIN 

the most effective and durable Arc- 
Lamp Suspension in the world. 

Heavily galvanized— therefore absolutely rust 
proof. Impervious to ice and sleet. Uniform in 
strength. Perfectly flexible. Will outwear 
cord, cable or rope many times over. 

MILLIONS OF FEET IN USE. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Ltd, Niagara Falls, Ont. 




Freezes two flavors of Ice Cream or an Ice 
or Sherbet and Ice Cream at one and same 
time, in one freezer. 

SOMETHING ENTIRELY NEW 
—NEVER DONE BEFORE. 

THE can is divided in two parts 
by a vertical partition. One 
flavor is placed in one, the 
other in opposite side of can, in each of which the scrapers, etc., 
operate. The can cannot be turned as in old style freezers, be- 
cause of the partition. It is therefore swung to and fro by a rock- 
ing motion of the crank. This is a more comfortable and much 
easier movement. It is very much less tiresome than turning a crank. 
One can sit back in a chair with freezer alongside and rock the crank 
to and fro without discomfort or undue exertion and even read at same 
time. Although two flavors are frozen at once and with less exertion, no more 
time is required than in old style freezers. 

The Pails have electric welded wire hoops, which are guaranteed not to break or fall off; Cans are of 
heavy tinplate with drawn steel bottoms that are guaranteed not to fall out or break and do not leak, the 
strongest and most durable Freezer Can'made; the Automatic Twin Scrapers by their positive action insure 
perfect scraping of frozen particles from side of can. All inside parts are heavily coated with pure block tin. 
and outside parts all thoroughly galvanized. 
SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 




ICE CREAM 

FREEZERS 

THAT SELL 





TMEY ARE 

Well Advertised 
In Demand 
Easily Sold 
Satisfactory In Use 
Of Known Reputation 



THEY EXCEL IN 

Easy Running 
Quick Freezing 
Economy 
Convenience 
Practical Results 



Send for Catalog. 



North Dros. Mfg. Co. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Pii\lr'c MADE IN CANADA 

Lumbering 
Tools 



Send for Catalogue 
and Price List 



THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 
Zealand, Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of Lumber Tools 

Pink's Patent Open Socket Peaveys. 
Pink's Patent Open Socket Cant Dogs. 
Pink's Patent Clasp Cant Dogs, all Handled 
with Split Rook Maple. 

These are light and durable tools. 

Sold throughout the Dominion 
by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants 

MANUFACTURED BT 

■sxrsjsr THOMAS PINK 
Pembroke, Ont., Canada. 



Pig Iron 



"JARROW" and "GLENGARNOCK. 



5* 



Agents fOr Canada, 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co 



TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



urn 



You Buy Goods to Sell 

— Not to carry on your shelves 



Sargent's Gem Food 
Chopper is a seller, and 
it will not stay on your 
shelves if you let the 
housekeepers* of your 
neighborhood know that 
you have it on sale. 

"V^'U ? Becaupe it is 
~ • one of those ar- 
ticles that a housekeeper wants 
as soon as she knows of its ad- 
vantages — the work it does, the 
time it saves and how exceed- 
ingly useful it is. Besides, it is 
the best Food Chopper made : 
that you can guarantee. 




Special Attention Given to 

MAIL ORDERS 

Our Specialty is Prompt 
SHIPMENT 



Steel Cuttters Do Not Break 

— that's a point in favor of Sargent's 
Gem Food Chopper. It has four steel 
cutters for coarse, medium and fine 
chopping and for pulverizing. Thej 
chop in pieces of uniform size — do not 
mash, tear, squeeze or grind the various 
substances. The Gem is a well built 
machine intended for kitchen use day in 
and dav out 



A Food Chopper Too, that chops 
all kinds of vegetables, all kinds of 
fruit, crackers, bread, eggs, cheese, nuts, 
raisins — in fact everything that has to 
be chopped. It takes the place of chop- 
ping bowl and knife, and relieves the 
housekeeper of much work, saves time 
and is altogether a great kitchen con- 
venience ....... 



It is a Meat Chopper and chops 
all kinds of meat, both raw and cooked, 
better than anything else ever made. 
It is useful in the preparation of all 
kinds of dishes — the substantials and 
the dainties. It chops quickly, quietly 
and easily: is easy to take apart, easy 
to put together, easy to adjust, self-clean- 
ing. An economical article for Ihe 
housekeeper to have. 



SELL THE GEM 



LEWIS BROS. 



Limited 



TORONTO 



OTTAWA 



MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 



OALGARY 



VANCOUVER 



1! \ K D\V A R E A \ T D M K T \ L 






BUSINESS SUCCESS 

Mr. Dealer, if you could take out a policy assuring commercial success 
in your line you certainly would do so. The next best thing is to place 
your orders for 

Carpenters' Tools - Builders' Hardware 

with a specialty house — a house which guarantees quality and prompt 
deliveries. We handle 

Stanley's, Union Hardware Co. and Sarjent's Iron and Wood Bottom Planes. 

Disston's, Atkins', and Shurly & Dietrich— High Grade Hand, Rip and Panel Saws. 

Sarjent's Front, Store Door and Inside Locks. 

Stanley's Butt Hinges— all kinds, all finishes. 

Also headquarters for Wood Sash Pegs, sizes %, \Y\, 1%-in. in one-bushel bags. 

Remember our prices are right and we deliver like lightning 

THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., Ottawa, Canada 




Davidson's 
"Empire" Stove Pipe 

Improved Patent 

Neatly packed in crates of 25. 
Secures lowest possible freight rate. 

Deep Swage Prevents Telescoping. 
Coated to Prevent Rust. 

Sold as low as ordinary Stove Pipes. 



SIMPLE and EASY to put together. 
No Profane Language Necessary. 
The only tools required are a pair of hands. 
Pipes being cut out with dies ensure abso- 
lute fit and conformity. 




Wash Tubs— Galvanized 

With Wringer Attachment 



Miners' Camp Kettles 

Strong and substantially made in 
extra heavy tin. 

Nineteen sizes, from Vk quart to 29 quarts. 







f 







N08 

Top measurement, inches . 
Bottom " " .., 

Height " " ... 



1 2 3 

2 1 Va 22% 25 

1 7% 1 814 20 

9y 2 i oy 2 11 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Ltd., 



Montreal a ,; d 

Winnipeg 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



Only 
Wholesale 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 
138-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO. 



LIMITED 



Wholesale 
Only 




Builder's Hardware 



No. 242-lnslde Door Sots 




No. 070 Inside Door Sets 




No. 2039 Inetde Door Sets 




Store Door Handles and Locks 




No. 877— Front Door Sets 




o 



I 



No 0700 Front Door Sets 




No. 2202s -Front Door Set 



Our Prices are Right 



For Fuller Information see our Catalogue 

H, S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO , u« 

Opposite Union Station 

GRAHAM WIRE NAILS ARE THE BEST 

Are you receiving our monthly illustrated circular? IF NOT WRITE FOR IT. 



ITED 



We Ship Promptly 



H\ ROW ARE AND METAL 



GARNET PAPER 

Should be tough, pliable and not liable to crack. 

H. Barton's Best American have these 
qualities. It is used by the largest manu- 
facturing concerns and car shops in Canada 
in preference to any other. You should 
carry it in stock. 

Cuts faster than sand paper. 




In Sheets, 9x11 inches. 

IN ROLLS 

24, 30, 36, 40, 42, 46 j 

INCHES. 



V\.V\.\iK\T\tt\VS 

GARNET PAPFJ 

isi « 



Garnet 



iGMWEfPA?£W : 



Cloth 



/\L£M 






1 In Rolls, 14-inch. 




< Til I 




SAND PAPER 

Star, in sheets, 81 x 10£-inch. 

Baeder & Adamson, in sheets, ( .) x 11 -inch 

Baeder & Adamson, in Bolls, 

24, 30, 36, 40, 42, 48-in. 

EMERY CLOTH 

Atlas, Improved, in sheets, Hh x lH-in. 
Baeder & Adamson, in sheets, !> x 11-in. 



1 










WE HAVE A COMPLETE STOCK OF THE ABOVE. 

ASK OUR TRAVELLERS TO QUOTE, OR WRITE US. 



F.<*W. 



Hardware 
Montreal 



FROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN, Limited 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



New Screw . 

u stable Tap Wrenches 






SIZE EE STOCKS 14 IN. AND 26 IN. LONG 



Reece's New Screw Plate 
With Adjustable Tap Wrench. 



O^OO^^O^^' 



When there is work to be done the 

tools that will do it quickest are 

"Reece" and "Derby" screw plate / SS» ^il| 

sets. 

They will also do it best. 

They make perfect threads 
at a 5*Vig/i cut. Threads 
could not be cut more 
quickly than that nor 
better than perfect. 

"Reece and "Derby" 
screw plate sets are 
finely finished tools, 
put up in neat hard- 
wo od var- 
nished boxes. 



Reece^s New Screw r- 
With Adjustable Tap Wrench 






3£lv^j 



"Jl ^'-iliMrmi ^ hrrr^- Mill ' ' ...,lli H " ■ '- Mi" ■lllll! ^ : l im.'.H'i'i:: -i- ' : ■. .--^^-.| : :l M I II ,H I Hi iHl h» .^ 



DERBY SCREW PLATE^NO. J02: 
'MJ0V4-7 SIZES WITHTWO STOCW 
AND ONE N.©. 10 TAP WRENCH 



DERBY SCREW PLATE NO. 103' 
[ '/4T0 I, 9 SIZES WITH TWO STOCKS 
AND TWO TAP WRENCHES N0.9 AND 1 1 



>IZE 103 STOCKS 14- IN. AND 26 IN. LONS^ 



Sets are 
made up of 
both part 
and full as- 
sortments of sizes, 
adapted to every 
demand. 

We keep in stock 
all the best selling sets and sell 
lots of them. 

If you want to handle screw 
plate sets that will sell, handle 
"Reece" and "Derby." 




^mdM^&QJvmoi^^ 



WINNIPEG, 



MONTREAL 

OTTAWA, QUEBEC, FRASERVILLE 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canada Leads the World in the Manufacture of 

HIGH-CLASS SAWS 




No. 81 



The best and cheapest Hand Saw on the market, quality, temper and finish considered. 
Every saw warranted. Carved applewood handle. Patented, wave finish blade. 




No. 1 Maple Leaf Lance Tooth Cross-Cut Saw, and the No. Racer are tempered under 
our secret process. 








No. O Narrow Racer Cross-Cut Saw 



If you want saws that will sell and give your customer satisfaction, you will stocJ< 
the Maple Leaf Saws. 



ManuTaoturtl 
by 



SHURLY & DIETRICH, 



CALT, Ontario 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




'^Mtfrn 




^z&W"^ 



m 



Simonds 
Crescent-Ground Cross-Gut Saws 

For logging camps where work must be fast and economical there is no other saw made that can 
give results equal to the Crescent-Ground Saw. Made of Simonds Steel. It cuts easy, runs fast 
and gives good results. This cross-cut saw is sold by most of the leading jobbers in Canada. 

Simonds Canada Saw Co., Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 



PRATT AND WHITNEY MILLING CUTTERS 

are made in any size and shape. The standard for accuracy, uniform 
in temper, and of the best steel. 

TAPS, DIES, REAMERS, DRILLS, PUNCHES, GAUGES 

PRATT AND WHITNEY SMALL TOOLS 

B 

Arrangements made with dealers to carry stock. 

THE CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO., Limited, 

CANADIAN SALES AGENTS, 
MONTREAL = TORONTO - WINNIPEG - VANCOUVER 





Wheelbarrows 



All kinds and sizes. The cut repro- 
duced here is just of one of the manv, 
hut the kind every contractor should 
use. The substantial, satisfactory, 
steel tray Contractor's Barrow. 



The Bondon Foundry Co. 



LONDON, CAN. 



H-A'R DW A K E AN D METAL 



THREE BUSINESS BOOMERS 

Maxwell Lawn Mower Two Household Favorites 




Durable, 

Clean-cutting, 

and 

Beautifully 

Finished. 




They are 
both 
"Self- 
Sellers." 
Keep 
them in 
stock. 



David Maxwell & Sons, St. Mary's, Ont 



PURITAN 



REACTING 

WASHING 

MACHINE. 




"-* 1 | ROLLER,. 
>>J BEARING 



EASY. 



SIMPLE 




STYLE F. 



ft 

a 
ft 



PLEADER 

A Name Familiar to Butter Makers in Connection with the 

Highest Grade Churns 



ITft ftTRONQ POINtS: 

Stiff Steel Frame, with malleable iron fittings, Combination Bow 
Levi r and Pedal Drive. Bicycle Ball Bearings. Bolted Trun- 
nions. Cream Breakers. Barrel easily drained and conveniently 
detatchable for cleaning. 
Dealers : When you handle this line you handle QUALITY. 

The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., Limited 



W. L. HALDIMAND <& SON, Montreal 

EASTERN AGENTS 



HAMILTON 

ONTARIO 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK r gnc« ,T "" , ° W00PE " P,CIC " *" Wl " 

FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO.. Limited, 



■ LONDON, ONT. 



PRlE5T'SCLIPPERSi 

. ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machine*. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BXJTD FOE OATALOeTJI TO 

laiilm Skewer Mtg. (-.., leakae, Ii,«« 

Weibusch & Hilger, Limited special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 





The Peterborough Lock Manufacturing Company, Limited 

Peterborough, Ont. 




Crllnder Night Latch, No. loa. 




Manufacturer* of all fc/nds 



Rim and Mortise Locks, 
Inside, Front Door, and 
Store Door Sets, also full 
line High-class Builders' 
Hardware. 

Sola by all Leading Jobber* 
In the Dominion. 



IO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOOLS SELL THE CHEAPEST, 
WISE MEN THE BEST 




THE BEST 



Being supported by good and liberal advertising among the 
actual users of saws 



SPEER & JACKSON, LIMITED 

£TNA WORKS SHEFFIELD, ENG. 



fOBBEST QUALITY 




IN 



ENAMELLED and GALVANIZED 



WARE 

Buy goods 
manufactured by 

Ontario Steel Ware, Limited 

115-121 Brock Avo. and 73-31 F"loronoo S"t. 

TORONTO, ONT. 




ii 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



At kin's 

Silver Steel Saws 



Are just as good as they 
look to be 




FJnest materia!, Finest workmanship 
Finest finish 

MAKE FRIENDS AND MONEY FOR THE DEALER 

£. C. A TKINS & CO., Inc. 

The Silver Steel Saw People, 

Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Canadian Branch— No. 77 Adelaide St., E., Toronto 



The Long and the Short of It 



IT" MEANS 




THE "LONG" 

is the time it wears. It stands the test of heat 
and frost, wind and rain, and gives your cus- 
tomers manv years of solid satisfaction. 

THE "SHORT" 

part is the time needed to put it on. A great 
deal of time — which means a great deal of 
money — is saved to the man who uses 

SHIELD BRAND 
READY ROOFING 



LOCKERBY ®> McCOMB 

t>3 SHANNON STREET 

MONTREAL 



Sorting the Scrap 



:>e care 



fully 



Not all scrap makes good bar iron — it must h 
selected to give satisfactory results. 

London Dar Iron is made only from the choicest scrap, 
selected by experts. Consumers are unanimous that it has the 
quality. 



Orders promptly filled. 

London Rolling Mills 
London, Canada. 



n 





When in the 

market for 

GANG CHEESE 

PRESSES and 

up - to - date 

CURD CUTTERS 

1 u s t sit 

down and 

write to JAMES & REID, Perth, Ont. For 

FARMER'S FEED COOKERS write JAMEB BROS. 

FOUNDRY CO., Perth, Ont. 



The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO 

—Manufacturers of the celebrated— 

"Saugeen Brand" 

OF PORTLAND CEMENT 

Prices on application. Prompt shipment 




The Best Door Cioser Is . . . 
NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRING 

W'll close a d^or silently against any pressure of 
wind. Has man) working advantages over Uie ordin- 
ary spring, audhastwice tin- wear. In use through- 
out G-eat Britain and the Colonie'. Gives perfect 
satisfaction. Made only l>y 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, 

Ho pltal St., - - BIRMINGHAM 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their adver- 
tisement in this paper. 



12 



II \ \< DW \ R E 



A N H M ET A L 



A RECORD BREAKING SELLER 



22 CALIBRE 
16 SHOT 




I^W 



HOPKINS & ALLEN'S 



MILITARY BOLT ACTION REPEATING RIFLE 

7Cv There has long been a demand for a good rifle at this price — and the 

HOPKINS & ALLEN Junior Repeater fills the bill. This rifle has been and 

JST * s heing extensively advertised, and a heavy sale for it is created. 

SPECIFICATIONS :— 22-inch barrel, take-down, 22 calibre. Magazine handles 22 short, 22 long and 22 
long rifle cartridges without change of carrier. Shoots 16-22 short or 12-22 long or long rifle cartridges- 
Action, Military Bolt Pattern with positive safety device. Length over all, 40 inches, weight S l / 2 pounds. 



$ 



10 



FOR SALE BY ALL FIRE- 
ARMS JOBBERS. 




PLENTY OF GOOD SUPPLE- 
MENTARY ADVERTISING 
MATTER— FREE. 





WRITE. FOR CATALOGS 



THE HOPKINS & ALLEN ARMS CO. 

6 City Road, Finsbury 8quare, London OGpt. 67, NORWICH, CONN., U.O.A. 




Shows Bolt Drawn Back— Position for Ejecting 
Shells. 



Specify the Following Products 

Manufactured by 

American Sheet and Tin Plate Company 



PITTSBURG, PA. 

If you want the best. 



"Apollo Best Bloom," Galvanized Sheets, 

Blue Annealed and American Bessemer 

Black Sheets, 

Wellsville Polish, Range Steel, 

Wood's "A" Planished Iron, 

Black Steel specialties for all purposes, 

Tinplates, Coke and Charcoal, all grades, 

Terne Plates, Old Style and New 

Method Processes. 



Place your order with 



B.&S. H.THOMPSON & CO. 

LIMITED 

Dominion of Canada Sales Agents 
MONTREAL, CANADA 



QUICK SALES 

and good profits are naturally the outcome of 
handling 

Empire, Imperial and Champion 

AXE HANDLES 

To keep up the profitable pace see that you are 
always kept supplied with our 

Hammer, Sledge and Pick Handles 



Lists and discounts sent free upon request. 



J, H, Still Manufacturing Company, 



ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO 



Limited 



13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




THE TELEPHONE 



Is a companion, friend and servant combined. 
Invaluable for convenience in the household. 

LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE SERVICE 

Has no equal for the facility it affords in business life. 
Full particulars as to rates and service at the near- 
est office of 



HOTEL DIRECTORY. 



WINDSOR HOTEL, 2&2$5>»< 

This House is pleasantly and conveniently located on the East Side of 
Queen Street. The rooms are bright ana cheerlul. Kvery attention paid 
toguests. Billiards and pool. Hot and cold water baths. A. MoNicol, Prop. 

TOWTfT? "HTITTTT Georgetown, demerara, 

±WVVll.rV J1U 1 -EjIj, BRITISH GUIANA. 

This first-class hotel is most conyeniently situated in the coolest and healthiest 
part of the city. Fire minutes from railway statiou and steamsr staltings, and 
D8W t<> all principal public buildings. Cool and lofty bedrooms. Spacious Dining 
and Ladies' Rooms. Billiard Room. Electric light throughout. 

HALIFAX HOTEL 

HALIFAX, N, S. 

WOODSIDE BpARDING HOUSE 

THE BELL TELEPHONE CAMP ANY OF CANADA IOokmr or Main and Lamaha Streets, GEORQETOWN.'DEMERARA.) 

Cool and airy Bedrooms Excellent Cuisine, Attendance Qualified. Tsrms 
Moderate. Electric Car Loop at gate of premises. Patronage Solicited. Manageress 
E. Oottam. 

WINTER RESORT-Queen's Park Hotel 

PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD, B.W.I. 

John MoEwen, Manager. For Rates, etc.. apply Trinidad Shipping 4 Trading Oo. 
29 Broadway, New York. 

THE GRAND UNION 

The most popular hotel in 
OTTAWA, ONTARIO. James K. Paisley, Prop. 

DOMINION HOUSE 

W. H. Durham, Proprietor. RENFREW, ONTARIO 

The most popular Hotel in the Ottawa Valley. 



British America Assurance Company 

A. D. 1833 

FIRE & MARINE 

Head Office, Toronto 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Hon. Geo A. Cox, President W. R. Brock, Vice-President 

Robert Bickerdike, M.P., W. B. Meikle, E. W. Cox, Geo. A. Morrow, 

D. B. Hanna, Augustus Myers, John Hoskin, K.C., LL.D. 
Frederic Nlcholls, Alex. Laird, James Kerr Osborne, Z. A. Lash, K.C. 

Sir Henry M. Pellatt, E. R. Wood. 

W, B. Meikle, General Manager; P. H. Sims, Secretary 

CAPITAL ....... $1,400,000.00 

ASSETS 2,162,753.85 

LOSSES PAID SINCE ORGANIZATION, 29.833,820.96 



VICTORIA LODGE 



W 



ESTERN 



Mrs. J. F. SMITH, Proprietress. 

Opposite Victoria Park and Cedar Ave. 
Open Nov. 1. 



HAMILTON, BERMUDA 

Private Board $12 to $14 per week. 
Closes in May. 



Incorporated 
1851 

ASSURANCE 
• • • COMPANY. 



FIRE 

AND 

MARINE 



Head Office— TORONTO, O.NT. 
Assets over - - $3,570,000 
Income for 1906, over 3,609,000 

HON. GEO. A. COX, President, 

W. R. BROCK, Vice President 

W. B. MEIKLE, General Manager 

C. C. FOSTER, Secretary 



^" Money "^ 

CAN BE SAVED BY MEANS 
OF AN ENDOWMENT POLICY. 

YOU CAN ONLY SECURE 
SUCH A POLICY WHILE YOU 
ARE IN GOOD HEALTH. 



A BUSINESS CHANCE 

is often missed when it might 
have been easily embraced by 

Systematic Saving 

Begin now to prepare for the day of opportunity bv de- 
positing your savings in The Metropolitan Bank. In 
the Savings Department $1.00 or upwards opens an 
account. Interest is allowed from date of deposit, and 
compounded four times a year. No delay in withdrawal. 

THE METROPOLITAN 



Capital Paid Up 
$1,000,000.00 



BANK 



Reserve Fund and 

Undivided Profits, 

$1,183,713.23 



Pamphlets and Full Particulars regarding th« 

New Accumulation Endowment Poller 

sent on application. 



Confederation Life 



ASSOCIATION 



W. H. BEATTY, Pr««idont. 



W. C. MAODONALD, 

ACTUARY. 

HEAD OFFICE, . 



J. K. MACDONALD, 

MANAGING DIRECTOR. 

TORONTO, CANADA. 



14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




IMPROVED CARPENTER S 
TOOLS 



Sold by all Hardware 
Dealers 



STANLEY RULE& LEVEL CO 



NEW BRITAIN., Conn., U.S A. 




ORNAMENTAL WIRE LAWN 

FENCE. Sold In Rolls 

With or without posts 

and rails. 



You can sell our 

Wire and Iron Fences, Cates, Lawn 
Seats, Vases, Trellises 

and other specialties for Lawns and 
Cemeteries from Catalogues. 

Send for Booklets and Price Lists of these 
seasonable lines. 



Dennis Wire and Iron Works Go. 

Limited 

LONDON, ONT. 



gt ^afevs??)- 




WIRE AND IRON 

GATES 

Exira Quality 

Special Prices io 

the Trade 



0alt Sure grip Shingles 

are timply wonders to sell, to lay and to uake friends. Once used 
and you would never use any other — your customers wouldn't let you. 

"Sure-Grips" make a really handsome roof, as well as the most 
weatherproof. Try them — that's all we ask. 

"Gai.t" Corrugated Sheets are best English galvanized stock, pressed 
straight and true. Our prices are right, and we can ship promptly. 

Consult us before purchasing Ceilings, Sidings, Roofings, Cornices, 
Skylights, Ventilators, Finials, Fire-proof Windows, Expanded 
Metal Lath, etc. 

The "Galt Kind" is the line to push ; we protect 
and assist our customers. 

THE GALT ART METAL CO., Limited 

GALT, - ONT. 




CARRIACE 

SPRINGS & axle:* 

ANCHOR 



BRAND 




THE CUELPH SPRING & AXLE CO. 

LIMITED 

CUELPH, ONT. 



MITCHELL' SELF-TESTING SAFETY CODE 

REVISED EDITION 

A New and Scientific System for the Tra-smisiion of 
Messages liy Telegraph or Cable, so arranged that one word 
may convey several meanings, such as Article Quality, Price 
Quantity. Terms, etc. 

Bj other codes three and four words are required ti 
express what this system will convey in one word, tlum 
c<>sti g three and four times as much as the same message 
if sent by this system. 

EXAMPLES 

Code Words 
LUDSELPIEI, MKUDIKOLAF VYOCUMZEXGI— 8hipby 

Cunard Steamer fn m your port 28th June 150 pieces 

Hen-lied Plate (Mass, IS" bevel, 18£ x 24". 
WTJLTBSABNI— 8 eel sheets27g, 24 x I'd", 10,000 packages. 
WUfl II RAHIIK: -W.re Nails Sd. Buy .500 kegs. 
WIWUI.KAFDE -Kosin, 'T'qualily quote cost and freight 

shipment 1st half of next month, 200 barrels 
XASYSJABBA Delivery Waggon Platform Springs 2 to 

3,000 lbs . increase our order to tea. 
Try these with your codes. An 8-page prospectus with full 
particulars sent free on request. 

The Mitchell Self -Testing Safety Code Co. 



8 COLBORNF ST. 



TORONTO. CANADA 



Jardine Hand Drills 

New Designs 

Gel samples of these machines ior 
your show room. They will interest 
your customers and prove a good in- 
vestment. 

It pays to sell the best Tools. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 



HESPELER 



ONTARIO 



■ FULL STOCK... 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERP1PE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

THE GANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO, 



HAMILTON, OUT. 



TORONTO, Of " 



15 



II A RDWARE A X 1> M E r A I. 



ESTABLISHED 1795 



JOHN SHAW & SONS 

WOLVERHAMPTON, Limited 



WOLVERHAMPTON 



Coil Chain 

Canada Plates 
Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Galvanized Sheets 
Bar Iron 

Lowest Prices for Import. 

J. H. ROPER 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE 

82 St. Francois Xavier Street, - MONTREAL 



MONEY IN THE FENCE 







There is money for you in the 



it 



. I 



Dillon" Hinge-Stay 
Field Fence 

It is the most DURABLE, ECONOMICAL and SALE- 
ABLE fence on the market. 

It costs you nothing; to get our descriptive literature— just 
ask for it. 

THE OWEN SOUND WIRE FENCE CO., LJnM 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

QnlH hu ( Me88r8 - Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal 
OUIU Ul Messrs. Christie Bros. Co., Limited, Winnipeg 
(The Abercrombie Hardware Co., Vancouver 




BEAVER POST-HOLE DIGGER 

will please your customer. A pleased customer is an 

asset to any business. No wood to rot, check or break. 

Special Discounts to Trade 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 



LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE and WORKS, TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices : Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, 

Vancouver, Rossland 



Winnipeg: 



TRADE WITH ENGLAND 

Every Canadian who wishes to trade 
successfully with the Old Country 
should read 

"Commercial Intelligence". 

(The address is 168 Fleet St., 
London, England) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual sub- 
scription, including postage, $4.80). 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed to 
advertise without charge in the paper. See the 
rules. 



"KANDA" im. LIQUID METAL POLISH 

BRITISH MANUFACTURE. 

Absolutely non-inflammable. Has no bad smell. 

Leaves no Verdigris. Contains no acid or grit. 

Leaves no greasy smear. KANDA polishes all metal. 

K.ANDA & CO AS rw.ngH.n st., 

liirVr,Ay ^ ** v ' v '«» LONDON. ENGLAND 

SOLE AGENTS for Ontario: 

THE KENNEDY HARDWARE CO., Ltd. 




TORONTO 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their adver- 
tisement in this paper. 



Expert Bookkeeping 

Investigation and auditing of all classes 
of accounts undertaken. Trading, profit 
and loss accounts and balance sheets 
prepared. Sets of books opened and 
office systems devised in an up-to-date 
manner. Collection of accounts a 
specialty. 

Davenport, Pickup & Co. 

622 Mclnljre Block and 422 Ashdown Block 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 
AND AT BRANDON, MAN. 

Square your Accounts 



16 



II \ R 1) \\ ARE AND METAL 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦»♦♦♦♦»►♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Consumers Cordage Co., 



CORDAGE 



LATHYARN 



Manufacture every variety of 

BINDER TWINE 



LIMITHD 



PACKING 



^Js' 



SMALL TWINES 



From Manilla, Sisal, Italian, Russian, Juth 

Tallow Laid Transmission Rope, 3 or 4 Strand 

Oil Well Drilling Cables, Lariat Hope, 3 or 4 Strand, 

Halyards, Deep Sea Line, Snap Halters, Snap Plow Lines, 

Clothes Lines, Hide Cord, Pulp and Paper Cord, 

Tarred Rope, Marine, Eouselme 

Wrapping, Roiling, Seaming, Sewing and Grape Twines 

Careful Execution SPECIAL ORDERS Prompt Shipment 

Mills: riONTREAL, QUE., and HALIFAX, N.S. 



BRANCHES: 



F.H.ANDREWS & SON, Quebec. CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO., Limited, 8t. John, N.B. MacGOWAN & CO., Vancouver 

TEES & PERSSE, Limited, Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton. GEO. WOOD, London, England. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg, Binder Twine Distributors for Northwest. 




If You want an Awning, why not try 

The Tobin Tent & Awning Co. 
Ottawa? 

It's worth considering. 




FACTS 



about the best 

CONE ROTARY VENTILATOR 

on the market 



Known everywhere as PEARSON'S 

This ventilator is set in motion by the least current of air and will give a perfect 
draught at all times. 

Substantial in make, Ornamental in appearance. 
Can Pen 97 laaq For balky chimneys and ventilating Churches, Schools, Halls, Factories, Steamers, 

' l0 " Public and Private Buildings, Stables, Water Closets, &c. 

This Ventilator is in use throughout the Dominion, and has proved a great success. 
Remember every Ventilator is guaranteed to work satisfactorily. 
They are made in sizes from 2' : to 48 inches. 

All orders by mail promptly attended to Testimonials on application. 
Write to-day for particulars to the owners ! 

Office and Works: 17 Pontiac Street. MONTREAL 
Bell Telephone East 2106 



Geo. D. Pearson & Co., 



Are you interested in any of the lines that are advertised ? 
A Post Card will bring you price list and full information. 
Don't forget to mention Hardware and Metal. 



THE "HARDWARE" 
CLEARING HOUSE 



The "Want Ad" page of Hard- 
ware and Metal is a Clearing- 
House where buyer and seller meet 
each week. Here the man who 
wants an opportunity finds the 
man who has one to offer. 

The "want ad" is sometimes 
despised because it looks small, 
hut remember it will carry your 
message within four days to prac- 
tically every hardware merchant 
stove and tinware dealer from 
Halifax to Vancouver. It intro- 
duces men whose interests are 
mutual and Facilitates an arraugc- 
rhent satisfactory to all concerned. 
Rates 2c per word for first inser- 
tion. Lc per word for subsequent in- 
sertion, and five cents for box 
number. 

Send cash with advertisements. 



Hardware and Metal 



Montreal Toronto Winnipeg 



17 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FURNACE SATISFACTION 



•» 




Apart from the Shrewd Dealer's desire to handle The Best Furnace the exigen- 
cies of business compel all wise Hardwaremen to stock and recommend That Particular 
Furnace which yields most satisfaction to their customers. It's an easily proven fact 
that The Empire King: is known from ocean to ocean as The Furnace that satisfies. 

Here are some of the reasons for superiority of 



The 



Empire King 
Furnace 



Simplicity of construction. The Empire King has few parts — therefore few 
joints. Fi-spces having a large number of parts and complicated flues are trouble- 
creators and soon become useless. 

Low Built. A low cellar ceiling does not uiminate the comforts a first-class 
heating apparatus affords. Base ring— is strong, heavy and solid-a fitting foundation 
for The Best Furnace. 

Ask for more reasons why you should talk the Empire King Furnace. 



The Canadian Heating and Ventilating Co., 



OWEN SOUND, ONT. 



LIMITED 



THE CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO.. 126 West 
Craig St., Montreal. Que., Agents for the Province of 
Quebec. 



THE CHRISTIE BROS. CO., Limited, 238 King St.. Winnipeg 
Man., Western Agents. 

The Abercrombie Hardware Co., Vancouver, B.C. 



/7'S A LATCH THAT EVERY BARN NEEDS 

WHITCOME 

STEEL 
BARN 
DOOR 
LATCH 

It is convenient; it is strong: 
it is durable; it is adapted to any 
thickness of door ; and harness, 
etc., will not catch on it. Fully 
guaranteed. 

Cet a sample and see what an 
excellent Latch it is. 

ALBANY HARDWARE SPECIALTY MFG. CO. 

Manufactures PATENTED SPECIALTIES BY CONTRACT 




ALBANY, WISCONSIN, U.S.A. 



18 



!l.\k D\V \ R E AND MET \ L 




THERE IS MONEY IN MERIT! 

An article which sells readily on its merit is a profitable line for 
you to handle. It cannot be denied that the 

JONES SIDE-WALL RECISTERS 

have all the customer-pleasing points— saving your customer's money 
on a heating system by reducing piping 50 per cent and giving thorough 
and lasting satisfaction. 

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS 

The Jones Register Co. 



732 King St. West 



Toronto, Canada 



Wrought Steel Registers 



QQEOUCOOOO 



iiiasioMi 



Standard Sizes, All Finishes 
Perfect Operating Device 
Unusually Large Air Space 
For Sale by Leading Jobbers 



QB^QQQOQOO 



HART (EL COOLEY CO 

New Britain, Conn., U.S.A. 




H. & C. No. 100. 



FERROSTEEL REGISTERS 



The only house in the world manufacturing 



CAST IRON FLOOR 

SEMI STEEL FLOOR 

WROUGHT STEEL FLOOR 

CAST IRON SPECIAL SIDE WALL 

WROUGHT STEEL SPECIAL SIDE WALL 

FLAT OR CONVEX EXTRA SHALLOW SIDE WALLS 

DEFLECTORS, PANCAKES, WAFERS 




In all Designs and Finishes. 

Mechanism Perfect. 

Capacity Greatest. 

Finish Unsurpassed. 

No reputable line can undersell us. 



E!I^ 



ftSMKBESSfttr 



MOORISH DESIGN 



FERROSTEEL COMPANY, 



CLEVELAND, OHIO 



•* **• 



fAfcEOWITIt 
IANTF0RD . 
iqkNc «^<J; O.P.R. 
i '- r,> : T].i 20200 




Brantford Roofin g 

We beg to announce to the Trade throughout 

Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia 

that our representative, MR. J. S. McGUIRL will call upon 
you shortly in the interest of 

Brantford Roofing Co., Brantford, Canada. 



19 



HARDW \ R E WD METAL 



A BRAND NEW ONE 



The WES 




EH STEEL COOK 



THE LOW COST, ECONOMY and ATTRACTIVE APPEARANCE 
CANNOT FAIL TO INTEREST THE CLOSEST BUYER 

A Handsome, Medium Sized, Low Priced, Four Hole, Planished Steel Cook 

which has all the Features of a High Priced Stove, a Quick 

Baker with Economy in the Use of Fuel. 



ASBESTOS LINED 




PLAIN OR NICKEL 



FINISH 



DUPLEX GRATES 



LARGE ASH PAN ' 



SECTIONAL 



LONG CENTRE { 

! 



ALL STEEPLEHEAD 



RIVETS USED 



; 



918. WESTERN IDEA, RESERVOIR, SILVER NICKEL FINISH 



THE DEALER CAN SELL AND RECOMMEND WITH CONFIDENCE THIS STOVE \ 
TO BE THE BEST IN ITS LINE MANUFACTURED IN CANADA 

GUELPH STOVE CO, LIMITED I 



GUELPH, ONT. 



-%^%.» t 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




You May Be a Good Salesman 

But, is everything in your favor? Are you selling 
the new Imperial Oxford ? A continuous stream of 
repeat orders tells the story to us. 



Removable Nickel 
Removable Fire Linings 
An Oval Firebox 
The " Divided Draft" 



All contained by 
the best looking 
stove in the mar- 
ket. 



It gives a good salesman a chance to spread 
himself. 

Drop us a card, or, better still, tell us the size 
range you want on your floor. If you get this 
agency you're lucky. 

TKe Gurney Foundry Company, Limited 

Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver Hamilton and London 

THE GUR.NEY-MASSEY CO.. LIMITED. MONTREAL. Que. 
THE. GURNEY STANDARD METAL CO.. LIMITED. CALGARY. Alt*., and EDMONTON. Alta. 



"SUNSHINE" FURNACE 

The most successful hot air furnace in Canada. 

Built to burn all kinds of fuel successfully. 

Large double feed doors admit rough chunks of 
wood and make it an easy furnace to feed with coal. 

All parts exposed to fire and wear are made extra 
heavy. 

Never gives any trouble after being properly 
installed. 

Has more good selling arguments than any other 
furnace made. 

Extensively advertised from Halifax to Vancouver. 

If you are dissatisfied with your present line write 
for catalog and complete information on the " Sunshine." 

THE HcCLARY MEG. CO. 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, ST. JOHN, N.B., HAMILTON, CALOARY 

21 




II \ K 1) W \ k E A X n M E T \ L 



To 



EVERY MAN 

»ho uses 

Fire Bricks 

We handle the best makes of Scotch 
Fire Bricks, and our prices are right, 
but there are occasions when you 
must have more refractory materials, 
and then pie ise remember that we 
are the Canadian representatives of 
the 

"HARBISON WALKER REFRACTORIES" 
COMPANY 

and this should indicate that we are 
the Fire Brick House of Canada. 
Others ol our exclusive specialties 

Lafarge 

Non-Staining Cement 

Iron Clad 

Portland Cement 

United Paving 

Bricks 



Best in the 
World 



Enamelled Bricks 

All Colors 

Drain Pipes 
Plaster, etc. 



Francis Hyde&Co, 

KING, QUEEN and WELLINGTON STS. 
MONTREAL 



Smooth finish, perfect threads and first-class 
material, are the reasons why 

"Diamond" brand Fittings 

are in such constant demand. 
WHOLESALE ONLY 

OSHAWA STEAM & GAS FITTING CO., 

OSHAWA.CANADA LIM,TEI 




Don't Stop 




to ask your neighbor, lift 

the load yourself with 

The Burr Self-Locking 

Tackle Block. Saves the labor of two or three 

000 to 5,000 pounds capacity. 



Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Munro Wire Works, Winnipeg 
Vokes Hardware Co., Toronto 
F. Hamilton & Co., Hamilton 
The Burr Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio 



YOU RUIN NO FRISK 

when you handle our Stove and Furnace Cement. We give you a 
money-back guarantee that 

STERNE'S ASBESTOS STOVE AND 
FURNACE CEMENT 

is the very best. We are sure of it, or we wouldn't guarantee it. 
Send for particulars anyway. 

O. F". STERNE & SONS, 

BRANTFORD, - - ONTARIO 



Steel Troughs and Tanks 

We Manufacture 
Steel Tanks, Stock Tanks. Steel 
Cheese Vats, Thresher's Tanks, 
Hog Troughs, Water Troughs, Feed 
Cookers. Grain Boxes, Coal Chutes, 
Smoke Stacks. 

Agents Wanted. 

The STEEL TROUGH and MACHINE CO. Ltd., TWEED. ONT. 



Forwell Foundry Co. 

BERLIN, ONT. 

Manufacturers of 

SOIL PIPE, FITTINGS, and CAST IRON SINKS 

Ask Jobbers for <> F. F. GO." •rand 





SVmond 



S/MONDS HAND SAWS 

are good sellers. Dealers should send for 1907 Catalogue and discounts. 

SIMONDS MANUFACTURING CO. 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

Branches Throughout The United States 



SIMONDS No. Sy 2 

This Saw is of the general style 
and shape which carpenters have 
been accustomed to using for years 
past. Has a carved apple handle 
with highly polished sides and edges, 
making a very pretty Saw. Holds its 
cutting edge and saws true. Its high 
quality and even temper are due to 
the fact that it is Made of Simonds 
Steel. Covered by the broadest 
Simonds warranty. 



II \RDWARE AND METAL 





WE DESIGN AND MANUFACTURE 

An Extensive Line of 

ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

Gas and Combination Fixtures 



We make these 
goods in com- 
bination with 
Art Glass, 
Crystals and 
Hammered 
Brass. 



_. . . . . n mm - J% 93-9/ Adelaide St. 

he Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Limited Toronto 



Bath-Room Accessories 

Stationary Tooth-brush 
Holder, nickel-plated on 
brass plate. Holds six 
brushes. Openings shown by old English letters. 




Comb and Brush Shelf, nickel plated on brass 
plate. Just as substantial as it looks. It does 
not accumulate dirt. 

Two fast sellers. All our Bathroom Accessories 
have "Forsyth" Finish, which places them in the 
peerless class. 

Secure our literature. It will interest you. 



Forsyth Manufacturing Co 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

W. F. Canavan, 13 St. John Street, Montreal, Representative 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



Standard Ideal Porcelain 

Enameled Ware 









■ BUM fj»« w ,hujw i m .n 



u hi \\9\1mmM 



is made in Canada; it is of superior quality; it ensures the dealer bigger profits; 
it gives the customer satisfaction. All things beitTg equal a distinctly Canadian 
product should receive the preference. 

Standard Ideal Lines: 

Bath Tubs. Sitz Baths, Shower Baths, Lavatories, Urinal Ranges, Slop 

Hoppers, Laundry Tubs, Sinks, Closet Ranges, Steamship Supplies, Railway 

Car Supplies, Hospital Appliances. 

The Standard Ideal Co., Limited 

Head Offices and Factories, - PORT HOPE, Ont. 

Sales Offices and Sample Rooms, 50 Colborne Street, TORONTO 
128 West Craig Street, MONTREAL, and 24 Telfer Block, WINNIPEG 



IMPROVED 



WIRE 

TRACE 

CHAINS 



Every chain guaranteed. 
Gives universal satisfaction. 



THE 



*^^j 



B. GREENING WIRE CO. 



LIMITED 



Hamilton, Ont, Montreal, Que. 




GENUINE 



It Pays to Stock Our Lines 





"SATURN" 



"SATURN" 





"SATURN 



AUTOMATIC INJECTOR 

The choice of all intelligent 
engineers and manufacturers. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER. 



Plain Compression Grease Cups 

A good cup for general use. Made of 
red metal and well finished. 

PENBERTHY INJECTOR CO., LIMITED, 

NA/ INDSOR, ONT. 



HARD W A RE AND M E T A L 




DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURING CO. 

MONTREAL TORONTO umia 

Manufacturers of 
PLAIN WIRE All Sizes and for all purposes, 

GALVANIZED WIRE % n T P l%%Il' e9raph and Te ' e ' 

Copper and Brass Wire 

WIRE NA/LS 
WOOD SCREWS 

Bright Wire Goods 

Staples 

Steel and Brass Jack Chain 

Spring Cotters, Strand Guy Wire, Steel Wire Barreli Hoops 



I" the GLASS CONE 




that 
makes 
this new 
burner a 
great 
success 



It gives full benefit of flame 

down to the very 

wick top. 

FOR SALE BY ALL PROMINENT DEALERS. 
Manufactured by the 

ONTARIO LANTERN AND LAMP CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. L,M,TED 



The 



w 



ti» 



MwitfMfe 



Buffalo, N.Y. 



% & 



When you get our goods you know you 
get THE BEST. 

We manufacture 
Water Filters 
Water Coolers 
Chafing Dishes 
Table Kettles and 

Stands 
Coffee Extractors 
Wine Coolers 
Nursery Chests 
Baking Dishes 
Crumb Trays and 

Scrapers 
Tea and Bar Urns 
Bathroom Fixtures 
Coal Vases and 

Hods 
Candlesticks 
Cuspidors 
Match Safes, Etc. 

All High Grade and exceedingly presentable. 

REPRESENTED BY 

H. F. MclNTOSH & CO. 

34 Yonge Street 

WHt 2&oau. TORONTO, ONT. 




25 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. BOKER &. CO.'S CUTLERY 




Recommend Boker's Pocket Knives, Scissors and Razors, if you want 
to work up a good Cutlery trade, and at the same time insure for yourself 

a good profit. You can double your cost price on every sale and still give good value 
and satisfaction to your patrons. 

FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES 



* 
<► 



> 



2^9*?«#9«???^?#?*9??^?99???«*?##^*?94??«??#?9???????^«?«?^#9^^#9*4ifr 



TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESSES 

"COLOURS," MATLOCK BATH 
"STEADY," MANCHESTER 

THE VIA GELLIA 
COLOUR COMPANY 

MATLOCK BATH,( Derbyshire) 

Manufactories 

High Tor Works, Matlock Bath I 

Via Gellia Works, Cromford England 

Barytes Works, Bonsall 

Cronebane Ochre Works and Mines, 

(Wicklow, Ireland) 

Raisers and Levigators of 

Mineral Colours, 

Natural Yellow Ochres, 

Turkey Reds, Venetian Reds, Red 

Oxides, Purple Browns, 

Turkey and English Umbers, 

Superfine Ivory and Drop Blacks, 

Natural Lump Rottenstone 

(Brown and White). 

REPRESENTATIVE 

WM. O. GREENWAY 

13 ST. JOHN ST., - MONTREAL 




Will Hold up A Shell 

That's what a shelf brackets for. 
For this purpose there can be 
Nothing Better. Nothing 
Ohupib than the BRADLEY 8TEEI 
BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong and 
Light. The saving on freight is a good profit 
aside from the lower price at which the goodf 
are sold. Order direct or through your jobbers 

ATLA8 MFC. CO., New Haven. 




" Quality Unsurpassed ' ' 

IOH-ORADE IVI ATERIAL, 
Skilled \A/ o r W nr\ & n , 

Up-to-date Equipment, 
Careful Supervl 

Account for the success of 

Belleville ^ Brand 

HORSE SHOES 




sion 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Toronto and Belleville Rolling Mills 





HOW TO BUILD A GOOD FENCE /mm 



Dept. j 



THK li ANVVKI.I. HOMI. WliUS FE.NCJE CO., Ltd. 
Hamilton, Ontario. Winnipeg, Manitoba. 



26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Alumino and Electric Oil Heaters 

The World's Best— More than a Million in Use 




This enormous number of " ALUMINO " and "ELECTRIC" 
Heaters has not been sold on bluff or pretence. 

They've been sold on QUALITY and PERFORMANCE. 

The oil-heater is no longer a matter of choice— "ALUMINO" 
and "ELECTRIC" are STANDARD the world over. 

Our wonderful "Safety Burner," combined with the beauty and 
durability of our Heaters, have placed them in a class beyond 
comparison. 

Any live dealer in any locality will find sales for the 
"ALUMINO" and "ELECTRIC" Heaters and should not be without 
a full assortment. 

We will cheerfully supply you. Send for our free book, "The 
Oil-Stove Salesman." 



LEWIS BROS., Limited 

Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Calgary 



EMERSON & FISHER 

St. J.hn. N.B 






Food Choppers 

The only Food Chopper not 

7 sold by catalogue houses, and 

advertised big in home papers. 

By giving complete and lasting satisfaction to 
your customers, Dana Food Choppers help your 

general sales. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER 

The Dana Mfg. Co. Cincinnati, O. 




Dana Peerless Freezer 
Write for catalogue 




The Standard Paint Co. of Canada 



Limited 




ROBEEOm 



Factory : Near Highlands, MONTREAL, P.Q. 

BOUND BROOK, N..I. and HAMBURG, Germany 

"RUBEROID" Roofing 

"RUBEROID" Dam|)course • 
"RUBEROID" Flooring 

"P. & B." Paints Electrical Insulating Compound 

Varnishes Insulating Tape 

"P. & B." Building, Sheathing and Insulating Papers 

Cast Lining Papers 




SELLING AGENT8 FOR ONTARIO AND QUEBEC 



Lockerby £» McComfo «,.„" »t. Montreal, P.O. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PROFIT and REPUTATION 
ASSURE SUCCESS 

Arc your profits reasonable and secure? Unless you are absolutely certain on both 
points you arc playing a losing game. You can secure both reputation and profit 
permanently by stocking the proper kind of 

WINDOW GLASS 

We do not pretend to manufacture imperishable window glass, but it is an easily 
proven fait that we manufacture the next best thing. 

Have you our catalogue ? You ought to have it because it contains suggestions 
for Fan* Lights, Door Lights, Hall Windows, Side Lights, Etc., made in Copper or German Brass. 

All orders shipped landed in proper condition because they are properly packed. 
LET'S MAIL YOU SOME INTERESTING FACTS. 

The Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited 

LONDON TORONTO WINNIPEG 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 



Manufacturer! 



RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 
HIGH GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES 

MONTREAL. 



A Certain Sense 

of Satisfaction 



1830 1907 



Seymours 
shears 



HALF A CENTURY 

FULLY WARRANTED 




Above is a reproduction of Show Card 9 in. x 15 in' in colors which we will send free to dealers in 

exchange for business card. 

HENRY T. SEYMOUR SHEAR COMPANY. WIEBUSCH AND HILGER, LIMITED, Sole Agents, NEW YORK. 

28 



goes with every MERRELL PORTABLE HAND 
MACHINE, PIPE THREADING and OUTTING 

MACHINE. We build them that way. 

Fordoing all kinds of threading— under ALL con- 
ditions— labor trouble and faulty material included 
—where speed, durability and ease of control count 
f i i something, our word to you is to investigate the 
MERRELL. 

Whether it be stationary or portable— hand or 
power driven— 30 DAYS FREE TRIAL must 
prove conclusively that your choice should be the 
MERRELL. 

This Portable Hand Machine has encased gears, 
MERRELL standard quick opening and closing die- 
head, and the latest improved Cutting-off Knife. 

Let us tell you more about this machine— The 
Chasers, Vise and the large range of work covered. 

Catalogue for the asking. 
Quick shipments. 

™ CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO. 

Sole Agents for Canada lln.lled 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG", VANCOUVER 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



® 



PRESSED ZINC ORNAMENTS 




We are offering the trade spendid values in all kinds of architectural 
pressed zinc ornaments, including : 

CABLE ORNAMENTS, CAPITALS, 
BRACKETS, GARLANDS, ETC. 

We can make up special ornaments to order, and invite your cor- 
respondence on the subject. ■> 

" WE WORK WITH THE TRADE" • 

® 

The Metal Shingle and Siding Co., Limited § 

Montreal Preston, Ont. Toronto 4 

® 

ST. JOHN, N.B. SALES AGENTS: WINNIPEG £ 

Emerson & Fishar, Limited QUEBEC Clare & Brockest (•) 

CALGARY J. A. Bernard VANCOUVER • 

Ellis & Grogan McLennan, McFeely & Co. • 

»^)#®«®»®«®«®«®«®*®#S'«®*®#®«®#®«®«®«® 




FOR PLATE 



Will Call on You 

Our Canadian representative is 
calling on the trade from Montreal 
to Vancouver. His trip will oc- 
cupy about three months. He 
will be pleased to show you our 
complete line of Silverware, 
Cutlery, Flasks, etc. 
Kindly address the Montreal 
office, making an appointment. 

U/>e House of Hutton 

Established in England in IftOO 



Sole Canadian Agent 
W.J.GRANT, Lindsay Bldg., MONTREAL 



>.OE A,. 




FOR CUTLERY 




ZEALAND. 



«£ Australasian ** 
Hardware and Machinery, 

Tho Organ of the Hardware, Msohlnery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 



post free to any part of the world. 

PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, - • 
BRITISH OFFICES : 

London, ■ - 42 Csnnon St.,E.O. 
CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ENQUIRIES will n-relvc prompt 
attention if addressed to the LONDON OFFICE. 42 CANNON' 
STREET. E.C. 

Spccimtm C»piet Fret on Application. 



The Howland Pump Oiler 



FOR SALE BY 



J. H. Ash-down Hdw Co., 
Geo. D. Wood & Co., 
Miller-Morse Hdw. Co., 
Jas. Robinson & Co., 
Lewis Bros., Ltd., 




Winnipeg 



Montreal 



A slight 

pressure of the 

thumb 

regulates the 

flow. 



Maple City Manuf acturinE Co. 

Monmouth, III. 



29 



HARD W ARE AND METAL 



PERFECT SAFETY 

is an essential quality of a salable riHe. Don't tr\ bo 
sell a rifle that's liable to burst anv minute. When vou sell 

HAMILTON RIFLES 

you know tiny cannot burst. The specially selected 

and tested rolled Steel, and the skilled workmanship 
makes bursting impossible. 

No. 15 sells at $2.00 

No. 19 sells at $2.50 

No. 23 sells at $3.50 

The "Profit Story" will interest you. 
Write for it. 

THE HAMILTON RIFLE CO. 

Dept. 71 Plymouth, Mich. 




NO SHOOTING AT RANDOM 



when you use Hardware and Metal "Want Ads." 

From Nova Scotia to British Columbia not a town is missed 
in which there is a Hardware Dealer or Manufacturer interested 
in the hardware trade. 

If there is a man in Canada interested in your proposition a 
"Want Ad." in Hardware and Metal will find him. 

Rates, 2c. per word for first insertion. 

lc. per word for subsequent insertions. 
5c. additional each insertion when box number is desired. 

SEND CASH WITH ORDER. 

HARDWARE AND METAL 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



"WINNIPEG 



Our Monogram is Your Protection 

Send us your orders for 

Cutlery, Electro Plate and 
Solid Nickel Silver Flatware 

and we guarantee to fill them quickly and satisfactorily. Our 
goods have a distinguishing quality and finish which pull 
business. 

The McGlashan, Clarke Co., Limited 

NIAGARA FALLS, - ONT. 

MR. J. MACKAY ROSE, 117 Youviile Square, Montreal. Qua. MR. N. F. GUNDY, 47 Hayter St., Toronto, Onl. 

MR. DAVID PHILIP, 291 Portage Ave., Winnipeg, Man. 



30 




TINPLATES 

All made out oi the 

BEST SIEMEN'S MARTIN STEEL 

Brand 

Best Coke or Charcoal "Rhyd" 

Good Charcoal "Edith" 

Second Charcoal "Sawel" 

Best Charcoal "Dryw" 

Wei are ready to offer the Canadian Trade 
very best value and finest quality in Tinplates. 

Baglan Bay Tinplate Co., Limited 

Briton Ferry, South Wales 

Please mention above brands in your indents 
and inquiries. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine) 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery, 6<1. and If. Can latere 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN 0AKEY& SONS, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 

Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

f elgoii Mills, tata, EuM 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, - 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Go. 

NICKEL FOR 

NICKEL STEEL 

The Orford Copper Gn. 



WRITE US FOR 

PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLATE 

NEW YORK CITY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




PAGE WHITE FENCES 

The Acme style you see above costs only from 16 cents a linear foot. Handsome and 
iluraMe for lawns, parks, cemeteries, etc. Any height or length. Gates to match from 
%2 2$. Write for catalog, or inspect this ideal fence. From lis direct or am Page dealer. 

The PAGE Wire Fence Co., l 



WalUerville Toronto Montreal 
tailed St. John Winnipeg eiz 




HOTTEST ON EARTH 

Our Bonanza Furnaces ^ 

heat with less fuel than any other make. Jobbers sell at 
factory prices. Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. 

No. 38 — Price, each, $7 80 net. 

No. 39— One size smaller, $5.85 net. 



THE TURNER 

53 Park Ave. 



BRASS WORKS 

Sycamore. Ill , U.S.A. 



••J" """*« World's Best Cutlery 

^1^^ ^•K^f You make no mistake in specifying goods made by 

^ JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS, Limited 

^iflNTED »" when ordering cutlery. A reputation of over 200 years 

at stake, insures the quality of every article. 

Write for catalogues from Sole Canadian Agents 

JAMES HUTTON & COMPANY, MONTREAL 



High-grade Bathroom Fixtures 





ARE MADE IN CANADA BY 



The Carriage Mountings Co., Limited, Toronto 




NO "CLOUDY" SURFACES 

come from using "Majestic" furniture 
polishes. When applied according to 
directions the result is a brilliant lustre 
— none of those smeared surfaces so 
common to many so-called polishes. 

Free from grit and dirt, " Majestic" 
furniture polish is all a furniture polish 
should be. 

Write for samples and prices. 72 
MAJESTIC POLISHES, Limited 

575 Yoage Street, Toronto, Canada 



Manufacturers' Agents 
ALEXAN D E R Gl BB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker. 
13 St. John Street. Montreal 



Representing Canadian. British and American 
Manufacturers. • Correspondence invited from 
firms wishing to be represented. 



CHARLES H. FOX 

Vancouver, Canada 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 
Selling to the Hardware Jobbers Only. 
Representing Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers, correspondence invited. Cable 
Address, Chasfox Vancouver, P.O.Box 1105. 

H. W. MITCHELL 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Correspondence is solicited from manufacturers 
wishing a representative in Winnipeg, 

Travellers call regularly on the wholesale anil 
retail trade in Western Canada. 

Highest references and financial responsibility. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sfl«»h Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clotbes Lines 

Stir Brand Cotton Twine 

Par Sale by all Wholesale Dealers. 



Covert Mfg. Go, 

TROY, N.Y. 




Harness Snaps, Chain, 
Rope and Web Goods, 
etc. For sale by Jobbers at 
Manufacturers' prices. 




AN ARMSTRONG- BORINC TOOL 
is always ready for use. Should bs on 
every lathe. Saves all forging. 7U per rent 
Grinding ; 9 per cent, tcol steel. 
Write for catn'ot'ii". 




ARMSTRONG BROS. 

TOOL CO.. 
106 N. Francisco 

Ave., 
CHICAGO, V. S. A. 




G= 



flUMBfc 

the CANADA METAL CO. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO. 



H \ R W A RE AND METAL 



Kemp Manufacturing Company 

|\Jo\a/ Improved Cereal Cooker 



104 4 pints inside dish 



106 6 
108 8 



■I. ii 



■I ii 




104— $13.50 per dozen 
106— $17,50 
108— $22.00 



DIAMOND AND F=> EI A « L_ WARES 



Kemp Manufacturing Co. 



Toronto, Can. 



The Kemp Mfg. & Metal Co., Limited 

111 Lombard St.. WINNIPEG 



The Kemp Mfg. Co. of Montreal 

39 St Antoin> St.. MONTREAL 




f 







A SIMPLE PROBLEM 

The choice of what horse nails to carry in stock, and push, is really a very simple matter. There are 
only three kinds: 

/. CAPE WELL 

2. CAPE WELL Imitations 

3. Antiques 

Samples, Prices, Catalogue and 1907 Calendar free on request. 

THE CAPEWELL HORSE NAIL CO., TORONTO, ONT. 

Branch Offices and Warehouses: WINNIPEG AN VANCOUVER 







HARDWARE AND METAL 



Does Underhand Competition Pay? 

Some instances told by C A. Kiler tend to show that co-operation is more profitable. 



Competitors in business generally 
misunderstand each other, and nearly 

always each is ready to attribute unholy 
motives to the other fellow without 
thoughtful consideration or investigation 
of any kind. 

Is it wiser for the merchant to work 
in harmony with his competitors, agree- 
ing to sell certain staple goods at a 
common price, or persevere in the old 
practice of underselling competitors and 
thus seek to win trade by the power of 
lower prices ? 

Thoughtful people must know that a 
merchant cannot sell goods at cost, ex- 
cept such merchandise as shop-worn 
articles, passed styles and finishes, and 
goods purchased under abnormal condi- 
tions from overloaded factories and the 
like. A checker player frequently gives 
away one man to his opponent in order 
to win two or three by the new posi- 
tion he has gained. And everybody 
must understand that merchants fre- 
quently sell staple articles at cost in 
order to sell many other articles at a 
profit. 

One buying an article of which he 
knows the value recognizes a bargain 
when he sees it. Hut the average cus- 
tomer doesn't know values and must de- 
pend on the storekeeper to give him 
what he wants. 

Storekeepers are closer to the people 
than any other class of men, and they 
run their stores to meet the require- 
ments of their customers — in other 
words, they are what their customers 
force them to be. 

Cheap Goods. 

People who complain of shoddy goods 
which they buy generally want cheap 
goods or live in a community where the 
demand is greater for cheap goods than 
it is for goods of a substantial char- 
acter. 

The man who thinks a home merchant 
is trying to skin him may be unwilling 
lo pay a fair profit on his purchases and 
therefore courts the treatment of which 
he complains. He generally is the man 
who assumes to know what goods cost 
and goes from one store to another mi- 
ni he -els the kind of a price he wants. 
Then in the end if he finds he has to 
pay for unaccounted extras he says 
with a loud voice that he has been skin- 
ned. 

If competitors would play fair with 
each other and let it be known when 
the sharp man is going the rounds he 
would find about the same prices at 
each store and be forced to buy goods 
a I a proper price. He would then be 
likely to quote prices from catalogue 
is or catalogues from out of town 
stores, but this talk is easily met; most 
merchants are happy to duplicate goods 



shown in catalogues at the same price 
and under the same conditions at which 
the goods are offered. These conditions 
are cash in advance and the Customers 

lo pay all the freight, drayage, and carl 

iug charges. 

It is never good for the merchant or 
I he people when staple goods are sold 
below the staple price at which such 
goods are sold the country over. 

In a certain Illinois city standard 9x12 
Wilton rugs are sold for $20. while over 
the rest of the entire country these rugs 
bring $35. They are listed at $32 whole- 
sale and must be bought, in lots of 100 
in order to be sold at the price for 
which they go in this particular city. 
This low price came from the jealousy 
existing between competitors — one 
thought the other was cut ting prices and 
therefore determined that he would not 
he undersold. 

Price Cutter Sick of His Policy. 

Some people think that it is a good 
thing for them when merchants get to 
cutting prices down to cost or lower — 
I he price of the rugs, for instance, puts 
I hem where many people can buy them. 
People will pay $20 much quicker than 
$35. There is no doubt but that more 
rugs are sold in this city than in any 
other city of its size in the country, but 
the dealers are getting sick of handling 
I hem. The man responsible for the 
ruinous price is to-day advertising an in- 
ferior rug as "the best domestic rug- 
made — price $35" — which indicates that 
he is anxious to discourage the sale of 
the standard rugs at cost. He even is 
willing to sell an inferior rug at the 
price the good one should bring in 
order to make up for Ihe loss he has 
sustained. Is this good for the peo- 
ple? Ts it good for the merchant? 
Decidedly not. 

It may be said that law "caveat emp- 
tor" — the buyer takes the risk — still ob- 
tains, and people should know good 
rugs from poor ones. Tt may be that 
people should know values, but it is cer- 
tain that people do not. We read of 
great bankers and railroad owners pay- 
ing fortunes for imitations of ancient 
ail. and the best of men do not know 
values outside of their own particular 
fields of endeavor. 

A furniture dealer recently went into 
a competing store to ask- a favor which 
readily was granted to him. While there 
he saw a sideboard like one he had and 
marked at the same price. On reaching 
his own store he marked his sideboard 
$■") cheaper and considered himself a 
smooth man. When the competitor 
found out what had been done it was 
natural for him to mark his own side- 
board still lower — both men expect to 
make up for the loss in other wa 

?3 



Should be Fair With Competitors. 

How different was the Competitor who 

went into Ihe same furniture stoic and 
saw some porch shades which he was 

also handling, inquiring the prices at 

which they were being sold, he found 
I hat he was lower on one size and higher 
on another, so he went back to his 
and made his prices exactly like those 
of his competitor. He was wise and his 
customers are sure of fair treatment al- 
ways, because by this action he proved 
himself to be a fair-minded man. By 
the same token the merchant who 
marked his sideboard down below the 
staple price in order to outdo his friend 
ly competitor showed an unfair mind 
and a disposition which will lake ad- 
vantage of a customer's lack of know 
ledge. It is better for competitors to gel 
together than seek to ruin each other 
It is bet lei- because when they are fair 
lo each other they are fair to their ens 
tojners, and nothing but good can come 
from such business conduct. If the 
laborer is worthy of his hire, the mer- 
chant certainly is worthy of his reason- 
able profit. (letting together enables 
them to make this profil and lo feel safe 
in asking it. 

Honest, fair competition really is not 
competition at all but legitimate busi 
ness. The great trouble is that we have 
come to misunderstand the word com- 
petition and confuse it with throat cut- 
ting. Competition has become throat 
cutting and that is not the life but death 
of trade. Price agreements — if not car- 
ried to criminal ends are legitimate and 
fair to all. 

How do You Figure? 
It is claimed that one of the chiefesl 
reasons for commercial failure through- 
out the country, is the lack of merchan- 
dising ability. .Merchants may buy right 
but it is another thing to soil right. 

Main merchants figure their percent- 
ages too low to enable them to cover all 
the expenses of their business, they al- 
low nothing for their own labor, nor do 
they count on taxes, depreciation, wear 
and tear on building and fixtures, beat 
ing. stationery and scores of little things 
thai in Ihe aggregate make a fair burden 
of expense that is not considered in 
price-making, 

Another thing that the merchant \'\i'- 
quently neglects is the matter of getting 
profit sufficienl to cover losses on left- 
overs or shop-worn goods. 

It would be well to avoid this loss and 
there is only one way in the world to 
do it. Moreover in this day it is easv to 
abide by the rule. Buy frequently and in 
small quantities. In this way fresh 
E '-. new and attractive goods are al- 
ways on display and they will certainly 
increase your business. Moreover they 
ill help yon In •_■'•' j our profit. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



From Newsboy to Hardware Jobber 

J. West tells in the Hardware Trade how a newsboy developed the qualities of a successful merchant. 



Jimmie Connors was a scientific news- 
boy. Thai is win he now is a trusted 
rtment manager in a down' own 
hardware firm, and if he ever reaches 
a higher rung on the ladder of success 
than tlio one he is on now he will ewe 
11 to the same energy ami foresight that 
enabled him to reduce his first job, tluit 
lling newspapers, to an exact sys- 
tem. Jimmie was horn while the sil- 
ver spoon was on its annual vacation, 
and his early education was pounded in- 
to him by thai rough old teacher to 
whom the poets refer as the hest in the 
pedagogical profession. When he was 
still in the prima i > class he was given 
a hunch of afternoon extras for a text- 
book, and Jimmie, with an appetite that 
was bordered on all sides by a first- 
class vacuum, found that the only way 
to eliminate this large and unnecessary 
hoi dri was to dispose of his textbooks 
to whatever passerby cared to take 
Ihcm oft his hands at one cent each. 

That was the start, and those who 
know Jimmie predicl a finish thai will 
land him well up among the high and 
mighty. He early learned the impor- 
tance "of little things, and this learning 
pplied to his first business venture 
nisi as he is applying it to his present 
work. 

Long on Brains. 

Jimmie was a newsboy only a few 
years before he developed into a mer- 
chant. His stock in trade was the same 
he became a merchant as it was 
while he was a newsboy, hut there is a 
great distinction between newsboys and 
merchants Anybody can hi' a newsboy, 
but it requires brains to he a merchant, 
and Jimmie was long on brains. 

All merchants are students of human 
nature, and Jimmie, true to his calling, 
made it a plan to know the men and 
women with whom he dealt. lie did'nt 
hot her about knowing their names, be- 
cause lhat was not as necessary as a 
thorough knowledge of their natures and 
tqstcs. He early learned what the ma- 
jority of present day newsboys have not 
jrel found out, and that is, that the 
average man or woman does not like to 
look for his or her paper on the door- 
step in the morning only to find that it 
has blown over into the next yard, or, 
what is equally had. that it was thrown 
carelessly on the floor of the vestibule, 
where everybody coming into or leaving 
the house or flat could walk over it. 

lie looked upon this practice, so <-om- 
mon among newsboys, as a defect in the 
business, and soon determined to allevi- 
ate it. This he did by always making 
sure th,,t every paper was securely 
folded and wranped with a rubber hand 
and then carefully pressed behind the 
doOl knob, where it could not fall out 

or he blown away. 

Studied His Customers. 

\t fust Jimmie worked in the down- 
town district, hut he soon picked out 

a Better location in an outlying part of 

the city, where he worked up a SOI 

delivering and selline business. Tint, is, 

In' had a number of customers to whose 
hollies he regularly delivered the mom 
pa] i and then, to lill 



in the day, he had a stand at an impor- 
tant transfer corner where he sold 
papers to those who bought them from 

day to day rather than subscribe for 

any one regularly. Delivering, however, 

he looked upon as a side line, as it was 
in selling Ui.it he made most of his pro- 
fits. 

Nobody ever sold papers like .Jimmie 
did. It was not his plan to merely 
hand out the paper and grab the money, 
like 1 he average newsboy does, lie 
studied his business and his customers. 
Located, as he was, at a transfer cor- 
ner, he made it a point to learn in what 
particular department of the paper each 
of his customers was interested. One of 
the men who bought off him every 
morning was a broker, and Jimmie saw 
that he invariably turned to the finan- 
cial page the fust Ihing. When he be- 
came sine that this man was interested 
in stocks and bonds, he turned his paper 
to that page and handed it to him, 
neatly folded, as he hurried to the street 
car. 

Gave Broker Financial Page. 

At first the broker thought it was 
merely an accident that his paper was 
tinned to his favorite page, and while 
he was unconsciously thankful for being 
thus relieved of the necessity of wrest- 
ling with his paper in the wind, or jab- 
bing his fellow passengers in the crowd- 
ed street car as he turned the pages, 
he did not associate the convenience 
with Jimmie. Gradually, though, he 
noticed that every morning his paper 
was turned and folded the same way, 
and then he remarked to one of his 
friends whom he met on the car, that 
this certainly was an accommodating 
newsboy. 

But the friend was not surprised. He 
also was a customer of Jimmie, and he 
had found out that the newsboy had 
learned in some way that his interest 
lay in sports. Every mornihg he bad 
found his paper turned and folded to the 
sportinc nage, and be, like the broker, 
at first had supposed it was merely an 
accident and not business acumen on 
Jimmie's part. The broker thought it 
was the funniest thine he ever heard of, 
and that day he told all his board of 
trade friends about it. Having a good 
income of his own, and appreciating the 
extra attention that was given him by 
the newsbov, the broker soon formed the 
hahif of slipping Jimmie a quarter as 
he hurried on to his office. And the 
heautv of it was lhat this quarter came 
to him as a reward of merit and not as 
a tip. 

Attention Doubled Business. 

Jimmie knew that he was giving the 
broker something he wanted and for 
which he was willing to pay. He didn't 
take the trouble to turn and fold papers 
for nothing. He knew he had a good 
scheme and he soon found out thai he 
could double and treble his income by 
that little extra attention 1o his busi- 
ness 

With the women he was the sa.mc way. 
He learned where each of his women 
customers traded and lie figured, and 

34 



' i 'In ly. lhat the averajri woman on hei 
way downtown was interested more in 
department store advertisements than 
anything else, and with tins knowledge 
as a basis he soon learned where each 
of his customers did most of her trad- 
ing. 

One handsomely dressed woman was 
surprised one morning, just as the 
broker had been surprised, to find her 
paper turned so that the advertisement 
of her favorite store confronted her 
when she got on the car. She, too, 
thought it was an accident, but when 
the same thine happened several morn- 
ings in succession she began to think. 
Then she told her friends, and then— 
what was more important to Jimmie— 
she gave him a dime with the remark 
ih.it he was a genius. Jimmie didn't. 
bother about the genius part, but he 
knew that dime would come handy in his 
business. 

Before long, Jimmie had worked up 
such a trade that the circulation mana- 
gers of the various newspapers began to 
make inquiries about him, and one mian 
even condescended to visit, him, None 
of them had been able to figure out why 
so many papers went to that corner, 
and when they found out there wq,s a 
frantic effort on their part to have his 
methods applied to other newsboys in 
other parts of the city. Hut it was no 
use. 

Won Success in Business. 

Jimmie was Jimmie. His individuali- 
ty was his own, and try as they would 
the circulation managers could not con- 
vince the other newsboys that his 
system was a good one. In their esti- 
mation his plan involved too much work 
and as the income was without a 
promise of innnediateness or certainty, 
the idea did not appeal to them. 

Jimmie could not lone remain a news- 
boy. One of the men to whom he sold 
a daily paper became interested in him 
and finally, when the time was ripe, he 
made Jimmie an offer that could not 
well be rejected. This man was in the 
hardware business, and he figured that 
any boy that could sell newspapers as 
Jimmie sold them was fit for better 
things. His judgment proved correct, 
and it was not long before the former 
newsboy was setting a pace in the hard- 
ware firm's office that made the other 
clerks wonder if he was run by electri- 
city. Jn a few months he was promoted 
to a foremanship and then to the super- 
intend ency of a branch house. Before 
long he was taken back into the home 
office as a department manager, and 

now the head of the tirm is beginning to 
wonder how long it will be before he is 
crowded out of the business altogether 
by his hustling and energetic subor- 
dinate. 



Use one of each kind of gasoline 
and kerosene stoves you handle for 
demonstrating. That is, keep some, oil 
in them and light them up for the cus- 
tomer— we do not mean that you should 
bake biscuits in them all the time. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Window and Interior Display 



A MISCELLANEOUS DISPLAY. 

The cut herewith reproduced shows a 
splendid arrangement of a miscellaneous 
display of hardware, the chief lines be 
Lng cutlery, sporting goods, mechanics' 
tools, and plumbing fixtures. This dis- 
play in the window of the store of I. 
.1. A. Surveyor Montreal, was dressed 
by H. A. liernier, who has many times 
previously proved an eye to artistic 
workmanship. 

The floor of the window is covered 
with green baize, and arrayed on it arc 
boat fittings and mechanics' tools. To- 



such as bits, augurs and chisels whicb 
are so ,il 1 1 ad i\ el\ shown, might be 

displayed to oven better advantage, and 
to the improvement of the general ap- 
pearance of the window, by having them 
nearer the centre of the display Again 
tire lloor of the window might have been 
raised at the back to more effect. 

One thing which the window-dresser 
kept in mind, and which is absolutely 
essential to an effective display, was 
cleanliness. Everything in the window, 
including the plate glass itself was clean 
and bright. 



pays even in the smallest towns. Many 
of (hem were mo-t emphatic in their 

testimony. "An attrtctive show window 
is worth more in mj estimation than a 
two-column ad. in a newspaper." "Our 
window advertising is the cheapest and 
best and most profitable part of our 
business." "Good show windows in- 
crease your sali- every day," "It pays 
well to dress windows, even in small 
towns." And so on. But the thing has 
lo be well done; this is insisted upon by 
one contributor after another. The win- 




MI8CELLANEOUS HARDWARE DISPLAY BY MONTREAL STORE. 



ward the back and middle of the win- 
dow will be noticed a simply construct- 
ed arch beautified by an ingenious ar- 
rangement of trolling hooks and a small 
filler at the top. On either side of the 
arch are vertically arranged cutlery- 
knives, spoons and razors. Underneath 
the arch are fhree ice water tanks. At 
the back of the window is a display of 
feather dusters. At either side of the 
window are displayed mechanics' tools, 
bird cages and plumbing fixtures. Every 
line of hardware is shown and for such 
a miscellaneous assortment, the display 
is an exceedingly creditable one. 

One or two suggestions, however, 
might be offered. The mechanics' tools, 



DISPAYS IN SMALL TOWNS. 
An American hardware contemporary 
recently raised the question, 'Does it pay 
to dress show windows in small cities and 
towns, and how frequently?" The edi- 
tor published answers from twenty-six 
of his readers, who spoke on the subject 
from personal experience. One gave a 
decided "No" to the first part of the 
question, another could not trace any re- 
sults lo his efforts in this direction, and 
a third did not think it paid in small 
towns, "as there is no protection from 
dust, which damages the goods." All the 
rest were satisfied that window dressing 

35 



dows must be kept clean, and so, too, the 
goods shown in them. That means fre- 
quent overhauling. Change every week 
is I he usual suggestion, although a few 
are content with fortnightly redressing, 
and one. like the moon, comes up new 
only once a month. To facilitate this 
frequent change, simple, instead of ela- 
borate, displays are recommended by one 
retailer. "The people will soon learn 
that you change your window often," 
writes the dealer, "and will stop and 
look every time they go along to see 
what you have in your window this 

week. " 



HAR OW \ R E 



\ N D M F. T A L 



Hardware*- Metal 



Established 



The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 



JO/f.V Bir« ,M4CtC4,V 



President 



Publishers of Trade Newspaper* which circulate in 

the Provinces of British Columbia. Alberta, Saskat- 
chewan. Manitoba, Ontario. Quebec, Nova Scotia, 
New Brunswick. P. K. Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal, 
Toronto 
Winnipeg, 
Lonpon. EN3. 



OFFIlKS : 

Z\l McC.ill Street 

Telephone Main 1255 

10 Front Street East 

Telephones Main 2701 and 2702 

511 Union Bank Building 

Telephone 3726 

- 88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

I. Meredith McKim 

Telephone, Central 12960 

BRANCHES ! 

1001 Teutonic Bldg 

J. Roland Kav 

No. 7 Market Wharf 

Geo. S. B. Perry 

Agence Havas. 8 Place de la Bourse 

92 Market Street 



Chicago, III. - 

St. John, N.B. 
Vascocvf.r, B.C. 
Paris, France - 
Manchester. Eno, 
Zt'RiCH, Switzerland ... Louis Wolf 

Orell Fussli & Co. 
Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00 
Great Britain, 8s. 6d., elsewhere - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

/~.ui a a j™. / Adscript. London 
Cable Address < . , ."V /-- j 
1 Adscript. Canada 



BUSINESS POLITICS. 
To be invariably successful, it is ob- 
vious that every deliberation and trans- 
action in a business concern be politic 
and canny. An Italian proverb says, 
"If you would be successful, do not be 
too gbod." From the austere view- 
point of the moralist, the above pro- 
verb is ,i glaring fallacy and in practice 
must be severely let alone. It really 
means that if a merchant is desirous of 
ruakinsr a bin sale he is justified in De- 
ng unscrupulous as to the means he 
shall adopt to effect the sale. It cannot 
be denied thai the tendency in comimer- 
cial circles is Swinging around in this 
direction 

Far from defending the principles of 
unscrupulous bargain-driving, we are 
Constrained to put down in type some 
of those things which characterize the 
politic business man. Commercial meth- 
ods are every year undergoing radical 
changes. The tad thai such methods 
are sensible to the workings of evolu- 
tionary iaw is the besl proof that they 
are working onward and upward, each 
step bringing them nearer that standard 
of perfection which should be 1 he goal 
of all institutions. 

The first essential to the successful 
carrying on of a business is persistence 
and self-reliance. Especially do these 
qualities prove invaluable in a 
newly organized concern. It needs 
courage and persistence to stick to the 
helm in stormy seasons of financial de- 
pression and scant v patronage, when 
each week sees an ominous increase on 
the credit side of the ledger and still 
more ominous decrease on the debit 



Then is t!if opportune time to bring 
into requisition a third essentia) quali- 
ty enterprise. Happj the merchant 

who can in limes when destiny is un- 
kind, call upon the powei oi invention 
and receive .1 prompt response. If he 
can hit on some new scheme foi attract- 
ing people to his store, and thereby in- 
crease ins patronage, he is fortunate. 
Ever] man in this world has some re- 
serve power. II is seldom called into 
requisition, and eminently successful is 
the man who tan call out his reserves 
at the right time It is not those 
powers possessed by men as evidenced 
in their daily round of business duties 
winch, place them higher or lower in the 
world's estimation, nor is it so much 
the aggregate power of their reserve 
forces, but it is the wisdom and canni- 
ness displayed in calling out these re- 
serve forces a1 the opportune moment, 
and in thus gaining the day. It is said 
by our pushing neighbors across the 
border that we lack enterprise, and the 
audacity to invest, thai our industries 
are still in the primitive stages of de- 
velopment because of lack of enterprise 
on the part of the promoters. It is 
hard to deny the truth of these com- 
plaints. Even in the hardware trade 
there are evidences of a lack of enter- 
prise and the investor's boldness. 



SHALL COURTESY BE RESTRICT- 
ED? 

Doubtless the average merchant would 
regret the slightest suggestion of placing 

limitations upon the degree of urbanity 
to be accorded patrons as a straining 
after a subject of debate. Unquestion- 
ably, too, he would not be disposed to 
bestow much thought upon the proposal 
that visitors to the shop be treated with 
scant courtesy if their purchasing pro- 
pensities are not of the most desirable 
sort. 

Yet the fact remains thai the question 
is one which is claiming the attention of 
merchants in this country and abroad. 
Iieceni issues of English trade journals 
have contained numerous references to 
the pari politeness should play in busi- 
ness. And be it said, the comments have 
been varied, and epiite emphatic on one 
side as on the other. Some have con- 
tended thai commercial transactions do 
nol Call I'm- more than ordinary civility. 
thai a man gets what he pays for; that 
1 he merchant is in no way indebted to 
him for his patronage. It has been ar- 
gued, also, that too frequently this qual- 
ity of politeness is overdone, and the 
clerk or the proprietor who puts him- 
self in the lighl of one who must affect 
an extremely affable manner in order 

36 



In hold liii- custom thereby detracts from 

his shop's reputation as a place where 
value giving alone is relied upon to hold 

trade. Now appears a prominent haber- 
dasher with a plea for a change of tac- 
tics on the part of his fellow merchants. 
say- he: — 

"You may discuss this matter eternal- 
ly from the standpoint of propriety, and 
different men will still be of different 
minds. What I maintain is based upon 
practical operations. I have seen many a 
man enter a shop and buy one collar. 
The salesman's face would beam. He 
would draw forth a mirror and aid the 
purchaser in adjusting his cravat. Tn 
fact, in every way the merchant has im- 
pressed me as appreciating highly that 
man's custom when he knew abso- 
lutely that his visitor boughl only when 
he fell it unavoidable, and then in the 
smallest possible quantity. 

' • Now in England such a man would 
mighty soon be made cognizant of the 
fact that no great value was placed up- 
on his custom. If he repeated the of- 
fence several times the merchant would 
make his opinion so apparent the man 
would go elsewhere the next time. 

"f believe that such an attitude to- 
ward the chronically small buyer should 
he encouraged. I believe we could create 
a new conception of business, one that 
would make men hesitate to play the 
'cheap 1 :i<d with us when they are ex- 
tremely free with their shekels in the 
cigar store and elsewhere. Mind you, 1 
do not advocate a coarse, rough treat- 
ment of anyone, yet I believe that by 
his manner the merchant and his sales- 
men may indicate their sentiments to- 
wards those who make a continual prac- 
tice of buying the smallest amount of 
merchandise possible to carry them 
through the day or week. " 

With all due deference to this \i"\\. 
we incline lo the belief thai whatever be 
the policy pursued abroad, the Canadian 
people, to speak bluntly, would nol stand 

for ii. They are remarkably independ- 
ent. They realize how keen compel it ion 

is, especially in the large cities. They 

are given to resenting distinctions of 
dollars or class. What they must have 
is careful, considerate handling. If this 
is not to be found in one shop they will 
hie themselves to another. And in the 
long run, the establishment of such a 
practice would, we think, merely tend 
to emphasize the democracy of the de- 
partmenl stores, which to-day are cut- 
ting deeply into the trade of even the 
must exclusive shops and where all men 
n equal footing. 



I! VRDWA R I- \ Ml) META1 



FOLLOW THE MARKET. 

When the manufacturers' and jobbers' 
price has advanced on a certain article, 
many retailers neglecl to raise their 
Belling price until their entire supply of 
thai particular article has been exhaust- 
ed and they are forced to buy ana in at 
the enhanced prices. A case in point 
has recently come under our notice. On 
.July 1st the Asbestos Sad Iron Co 

found it necessarj to advance the mini 

mum retail price of their poods in Cans 
da, on account of the increase in cus- 
tom:, charges. The advance was delaj 
ed as long as possible by the company 
in the hope that their poods might be 
placed under a more favorable classifi- 
cation. When finally the manufacturers 
were compelled to make the advance, 
most dealers at once raised the retail 
price to a figure that would enable them 
to make a profit commensurate with the 
increased cost of the poods. Some, 
however, who were fortunate enough to 
have a large stock on hand, are still re- 
tailing them at the old figures. Such 
a procedure is obviously as unfair to 
themselves as it is to their competitors. 
Had the change in the manufacturers' 
price taken the form of a decline in- 
stead of an advance, these same retail- 
ers would have been forced to follow the 
market by selling at reduced profits, or 
perhaps at an actual loss, ft is, there- 
fore, quite fair and legitimate for then, 
in take advantage of this advance in 
price, for it is a case where the rule 
cfuite properly works both ways. By 
selling at the old figures, they are 
simply cutting prices against all other 
retailers who are compelled to re-stock 
at the advanced rate. In this, as well 
as all similar cases where the manufac- 
turers advance their prices, we would 
strongly advise all dealers to adopt the 
new retail schedule at once. 



BRIGHT OUTLOOK FOR BETTER 
RAILS. 

It is seldom that an agitation meets 
with such immediate success as that which 
has resulted from the recent exposure of 
the poor quality of rails which have 
lately been furnished to the railroads 
as between the railroads and the 
railmakers conditions have been 
completely reversed. Three months 
ago, says the Scientific American, 
the railroads were urging the 
manufacturers to give them a better pro- 
duet : to-day. it is the manufacturers who 
are urging the railroads to come to a 
speedy conclusion as to what kind of 
rail they require, in order that thepres- 
> 'in stagnation of the steel rail business 
may be relieved. It was a wise move 
on the part of the railroads, when they 
jointly determined to place no more or- 



der- with flic mills until si, me bel ter mi 
derstanding had been arrived at. and a 
specification drawn that would meet the 

present conditions. There is evidence 
that the manufacturers are sine. 

anxious to i pirate with the engineers 

of the railroads; and it is only fair to 
recognize lln> fact thai the former had 
already shown a conciliatory spirit be- 
fore the present falling off of orders be 
pan. 

We note with satisfaction that more 
than one of the more important rail- 
making establishments are preparing to 
overhaul their plants, and put in such 
improvements as are necessary to meet 
the demands for a better rail. A des- 
patch from Pittsburg announces that the 
Carnegie Steel ' Company are about to 
rehabilitate, at a cost of $2,000,000, their 
famous Edgar Thomson rail-making 
plant at Braddock. In addition to the 
installation of engines to be run by the 
fuel gas from blast furnaces, the im- 
provements include extensive changes in 
the rolling mills, which, it is believed. 
will secure that more thorough working 
of the rail which is universally admit- 
ted to be necessary. It is also the in- 
tention of the company to build 'open- 
hearth furnaces, to enable them to furn- 
ish rails of open-hearth steel whenever 

ihev mav be called for. 



good profit, will have a lot of "guess- 
ing'' in (In iii liml out what has become 
of the profll he Hum-lit he ".as making. 



COST OF SELLING GOODS AT RE- 
TAIL. 

The cost of selling must be considered 
at some time, for it certainly has to be 
paid. What the cost is remains a mys- 
tery to many merchants who have to 
look after most of the details of their 
business themselves. The great mer- 
chants of the big cities have clerks win: 
figure all these things out for them, ac- 
cording to systems devised by experts 
for keeping proper account of the busi- 
ness. The merchant who cannot take 
time to figure out what per cent, it costs 
him to sell goods had better accept at 
least 2C per cent, as the figure. If it is 
much more, it is too much for the keen 
competition of these days. 

Then this percentage must be consid- 
ered in marking the price on goods. An 
article that is billed at a dollar thus 
really costs the store when it is sold at 
least a doller and twenty cents. If sold 
for a dollar and a quarter, it may prove 
a good leader, but it cannot be considered 
ed a profit-maker. The merchant who 
figures to make 25 per cent., or 331-3 
per cent, profit, and marks goods on 
that basis, "guessing" that that will al- 
low fur all expenses and leave him a 

7,7 



MARITIME BOARD OF TRADE 

No business organization in Canada 
LS more worth} the support ol its mem- 
bers than the Maritime II... ml of Trade 
It has been justified by its works and 
t hi- done is but an earnest of its 
possibilities. The year's meeting opens 
in St. John on Aug. 21 and it is ex- 
pected to excel that, of a year ago at 
\mheist. The veteran and able seen: 
tary, Charles \Y. ( reed, writing last 
week of that meeting, said: "In ray view 
the meeting at Amherst was the, best 
since t lir board was formed." 

In the same letter Mr. ('reed wrote: 

'The Government at Ottawa took 
notice of nearly all the resolutions and 
the greater portion of them were di 
cussed in Parliament. The Nova Scotia 
Government also fell into line. Techni- 
cal education is an assured fact and the 
Government is now looking for a site on 
which to erect the college. A Hureau of 
Publicity and Immigration has also 
been established." 

This is all very encouraging and 
should excite every member of the 
board and every business man in the 
Maritime Provinces to put forth an ef- 
fort to make this year's meeting a new 
record for activity and attainment. 



CANADIAN NATIONAL EXHIBI- 
TION. 

The Canadian National Exhibition 
will open at Toronto on August 24 and 
continue until September !•. To justify 
ils title it must make big strides in ad- 
vance each year, and the preparations 
that have been made indicate that it 
will be more worthy than ever to repre- 
sent this great Canada of ours. 

A number of new processes of manu- 
facture will be demonstrated, and" in 
these the keenest interest will centre. 
The Process Building has at present a 
strong educational value, which may be 
increased materially. The exhibition 
management recognize the possibilities 
of this feature, and seek steadily to 
enlist the co-operation of manufacturers, 
particularly those who make articles of 
everyday use, the evolution of which. 
from the raw material to the finished 
product, would, be interesting to every- 
one. 

It is impossible here to detail the mul- 
titude of attractions that will be found 
at the 1907 exhibition. Suffice to say 
that they will be better and more num- 
erous than any thai have yet been of- 
fered. 

Hardwaremeh will visit Toronto at 
this time in large numbers. Besides at- 
tending the exhibition, they will visit 
the various Toronto wholesale houses. 
Thus business may advantageously be 
combined with pleasure. 

When merchants are in the city Hard- 
ware and Metal will be glad to receive 
a call from them. They may have any 
correspondence addressed here, and a 
place will be provided where they can do 
any writing they desire in a quietude 
imi present in any of the hotels at thi- 
time. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE TRADE GOSSIP 



Western Canada. 

John A. Thompson, hardware mer- 
chant. Elm Creek, Man . has sold his 
business to C. C. Clough. 

The tinsmithing firm ol Wells & Corn- 
ish, Saskatoon, Sask . have been sue 
ceeded bj the firm of Elford & Cornish. 

Ulsey Bros., lied Deer, Alia.. hav< 
cently secured a nice contract 

-.- well tor the enterprise ami sue 
of this hustling young firm. It is 
lor the installation of a steam heating 
and ventilating system in the Red Deei 
public school. The specifications call for 
the Pease W aldon system. 

Mr. R. hi. Walton. Medicine Hat, Al- 
berta, who has been in the contracting 
business tor about fifteen years, is now 
building a two-story brick store on 
Main Street and when completed will 
rim a general hardware, tinsmithing, 
plumbing, heat ins and gasfitting busi 
ne^s. He expects t<. he in his new build 
i ii tr about < >ct . L 

The Great Northern Supply Co., Swift 
Cm rent. Sask., are putting up a new 
building 11th Ave., two storey and base 
merit 7")\11"). They are fitt in« up the 
hardware part with the finest fixtures 
in that pari of that country. The 
northern half will be used for hardware 
and the southern half for implements. 
The total cost when completed will be 
in the neighborhood of $20,000. The 
fittings for the hardware department 
were made by the Northwestern Marble 
Works of Minneapolis. 

Quebec. 

W. Strachan, Ottawa, was in .Mont- 
real this week. 

S. M. Howe, of the Dover Alfg. Co., 
Canal Dover, O., is in Montreal this 

week. 

G. YV. Dunn, representing- Lewis Bros., 
Montreal, in Algoma, is spending his 
vacation on a fishing expedition. 

The stock and premises of Denis Bros, 
hardware merchants, Montreal, were re- 
cently damaged to a considerable extent 
by fire. 

The hardware store of E. Garon, St. 
Gregoire, Que., was gutted by fire last 
week. The loss was partly covered by 
insurance. 

J. T. Smith, secretary-treasurer for 
Lewis Bros., Montreal, is spending a 
few weeks with his family at Trois Pis- 
toles, Que. 

I.. F. Blue, of the Standard Stamping 
Co., Maryville, <)., was in Montreal 
last week, also II. -Moulder-., of the Tay- 
lor-Forbes Co., Guelph. 

Edward Goodwill, manager of the 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal, is 
spending a month in the Maritime Pro 
\inces, combining business with 
pleasure. 

Thos. Blaikie, representing the Do 
minion Wire Mfg. Co., Montreal, has 
returned to Montreal after spending two 
weeks amongst the trade in Ontario, 
■ ailing in Toronto. 

Anions the July callers at the Lon 
don office of Hardware and Metal was 
Mr Y\ II. L\ans of the Canada Paint 
Co, Montreal Mr Evans, accompanied 
by his wife, is making ore of hi- fie 



quent \i-its to the Old Land, ami is 
keeping his English friendships in good 
repair, lie is fully appi ecial ing t he rest 
fulness of country life in England ami 
In- holiday is proving a great benefit. 

Ontario. 

Mi Hums, hardware merchant, \ew 

market. Out., was in Toronto on Wed- 
nesday 

W. L Allen of W. !.. Allen A Co., 
Cobourg, is holidaying in the Maritime 

l'i o\ inces. 

The stock of K. V. Benjamin, painter, 
Ottawa, was sold recently at fifty-one 
cents on the dollar. 

\ I), kcnellv, of the Toronto office 
of the McClary Mfg. Co., is at Toil 
Cockburn spending a couple of weeks' 
vacation. 

W. J. (iood, Toronto, city traveler 
for the Canada Paint Co., left that city 
for a couple of weeks' vacation on 
Thursday, 

Walter Ever, junior partner -of the 
hardware firm of .Jacob Kyer cV Son, 
Richmond Hill, Out. was a caller in 
Toronto last Tuesday. 

Watt & King, hardware merchants, 
Toronto, have dissolved partnership. 
Mr. Watt will continue the business, 
and the new firm will be known as F. 
Watt A- Co. 

A new plumbing linn has started 
business in Toronto, under the name of 
Robinson Bros. The firm consists of 
E. B. Robinson and G. EI. Robinson, 
late of R. T. Robinson, Toronto. 

.J. .J. Little, hardware merchant, has 
received a government appointment in 
the shape of the postmastership of 
Earlscourt, a newly created post office 
near the city of Toronto. 

E. T. Dean, manager of the Toronto 
office of Stewart & Wood, wholesale 
paint dealers, has left the Queen City 
for a fortnight's vacation at Lake of 
Bays, Mnskoka, at which place his 
daughtei has been spending the summer. 

A. J. Jackson, Toronto, has taken 
over the business of Orlando Yickory, 
and will have the Ontario agency for 
Heaver Brand enamelware, manufactur- 
ed by the Amherst Foundry Co., Am- 
herst, M.S. It is rumoured that Mr. 
Vickory will start a plumbing supply 
house. 

R. O. Kingan, of the Kingan Hard- 
ware Co., Peterborough, rode up to To- 
ronto on civic holiday by automobile. 
He called on several of his hardware 
friends in the Queen City on Tuesday, 
and reported that the roads between 
Peterborough and Toronto were in 
splendid condition. 

On Friday of last week the large 
block owned and occupied by .1. W. 
Richardson, hardware merchant, North 
Bav, was completely destroyed by 'ire. 
Mr'. Richardson's slock of hardware was 
, alued at $25,000, and the loss wan 
covered bv insurance to the exteni ol 
$14,360. The building was valued cl 
$6,000, two-thirds of Which was cover- 
ed by insurance. 

II. \\ I.ightburn, a member of the 
hardware (inn of .John S. George & 
Co., Nassau Bahama Islands, has been 
spending an extended vacation in Toron 
to for the past six weeks, and expects 

38 



to embark for home aboul the end of 
August. Air. and Mis. Lightburn— to- 
gether with their daughter, Miss F. 
Lightburn — came to the Queen Citj foi 
the purpose of spending the summer 
months with their youngest daughter. 
Miss Hilda, who will shortly enter her 
second year at Ontario Ladies' College, 
Whitbv. 



A VETERAN TRAVELER. 

II. (i. Allen, of the Oneida Coiiiiiiunit v, 
Limited, Niagara Falls, called at the 
Office of Hardware and Metal on Wi'd 

nesday, \ug. o. This was Mr. Allen's 
71th birthday and his many friends 
throughout Canada will be glad to 
know he is still enjoying excellen.1 
health. 

It is fort] years since Mr. Allen made 
his first trip in Canada for the Oneida 
Community. \t thai time traps were 
the chief line his firm had to sell to the 
Canadian trade. During the past fortj 
years, however, the Oneida Community 
have made great progress, have added 
many new lines, and have establish <d a 
Canadian factory at Niagara Falls, Out. 

Mr. Alien received many hearty con- 
gratulations from his friends in Toronto 
and Montreal, all of whom look forward 
with a great deal of pleasure 1o a call 
from Ibis genial "knight of the grip." 

Mr. Allen will leave in a few days for 
a trip across the continent to Los 
Angeles. 



A RUST DESTROYER. 

Hydrogen ions are said to be respon- 
sible for iron rust. This is a new dis- 
oovery of a Washington government em- 
ploye. He says that iron rusts because 
there is elect ro-ehemicai action and re- 
action on its surface. The hydrogen ions 
are essential to this process, and if they 
can be destroyed the rust will be pic- 
vented. The Washington man, Allerton 
S. Cushnian by name, claims that chro- 
mic acid and its salts are death to the 
hydrogen ions. It kills the "little 
devils," as he calls them, and thus 
stops the process of rusting. 

If this method proves to be all tli.it 
its inventor claims for it. he has civen 
lo the world a most valuable discovery. 
Put his preparation in the form of a 
paint and it will save millions of dollars 
of damage now done by rust to iron 
work of all kinds. A demonstration of 
the efficiency of chromic acid ought lot 
lo be difficult. Meantime let no man de- 
cry its potency, for is not this an age 
of wonders in every department of 
science and art ? 



COOLING VAT FOR MILK OR 
CREAM. 

A storage and cooling vai for milk ox 
cream lias been invented by Z. S. Law- 
rence. West Shefford, Que. The vat, 
which forms the objeci id' this improve- 
ment, is preferably of large capacity and 
of such construction that the milk or 
cream contained therein may be subject- 
ed lo a slow or gradual cooling or he 
suddenly chilled, as desired. The inven- 
tion also provides for a thorough mix 
ing of the contents, and for- bringing Hie 
same to a uniform consistency before 

drawing it off. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Markets and Correspondence 



(For detailed prices see Current Market Quotations, page 62.) 



MARKETS IN BRIEF. 



Montreal. 

Antimony— Firming. 

( tapper — Weak. 

Lead Pipe Decline from net list to 
5 per cent. off. 

old Material— Weak, with a general 
decline this week. 

Pig Iron — Stronger. 

Poultry Netting— Next year's list out. 
\eu discount on galvanized poultry 
netting, 50 and 5 per cent. off. 

Toronto. 

Lead.— Slight decline. 

Tin Ingots— Weaker. 

Lead Pipe — Decline from net list to 
5 pel cent, trade discount. 

( >ld Materials — Still declining. 

Poultry Netting — Next year's list is 
out. New discount 50 and 5 off. 



TORONTO HARDWARE MARKETS. 

Toronto. Aug. 7. — The local hardware 
market has been more or less inactive 
tor the last two or three weeks, but busi- 
ness is already commencing to revive 
and August trade has started out at a 
good clip. All seasonable goods are sell- 
ing well and jobbers appear to be quite 
gratified with the amount of business 
being done for this time of the year. As 
hist Monday was observed as civic holi- 
day in Toronto, the total business of this 
week will have to be crowded into the 
short space of four and a half days; as 
many members of the jobbing staffs are 
still away on vacation, to clean off the 
orders which accumulated over the holi- 
day and catch up with business by the 
end of the week means some hustling on 
the part of the present depleted jobbing 
st affs. 

Nails — The demand for nails is not as 
brisk as it was a couple of weeks ago. 
Meanwhile manufacturers availed them- 
selves of this opportunity to push the 
manufacture and supplies are now in a 
very satisfactory condition. 

Screws — Supplies have greatly im- 
proved during the past fortnight, but a 
slight scarcity still exists in those sizes 
for which the trade has most call. The 
manufacturers have made great strides 
during the last few weeks and before 
long supplies should be quite adequate. 
Quotations have not changed since tha 
recent advance and prices remain firm 
at the advanced figures. 

Builders' Hardware — The strong de- 
mand which has characterized the en- 
tire season still prevails. Jobbers have 
had a bumper season in all kinds of 
builders' supplies, mechanics' tools and 
indications are that the demand will con- 
tinue equally strong all through the com- 
ing fall. 

Glass — Trade has been rather quiet but 
should begin to pick up, as many houses 
and other buildings are nearing the 
stage when they will be ready for the 
glazier. There has been no further 



change in the price of plate glass since 
last week, the advance being well main 

tained. 

Binder Twine -The season is prac 
tically over, though a few sorting orders 

continue to arrive. Managers of local 
I wine houses report having had a much 
better season's business than they had 
expected. It is now safe to say that. 
compared with other years, (hey have at 
leasl held their own. 

Sporting Goods — A good business is 
still being done in all summer resort re- 
quisites. Guns are beginning to sell and 
by the number of sportsmen who are 
examining firearms and asking prices it 
looks as if next month will see a lively 
trade in guns and ammunition. An ad- 
vance of five per cent, has been made 
in Dominion loaded shells and these are 
now quoted as follows : Crown, fifteen 
and five per cent, off list; sovereign. 
thirty and five off; empty brass shells, 
fifty-five and five off. 

Stoves, Ranges and Hollow-ware — Will 
advance five per cent, on 1st October. 
1907. All orders received up to Sept. 
30th will be filled at the old prices, but 
all orders received subsequent to that 
date will be subject to the five per cent, 
advance. It is up to retailers to place 
their orders now and not be caught nap- 
ping. 

Lead Pipe — Has declined from 10, net 
list to five per cent, trade discount. 

Poultry Netting — Next year's list on 
galvanized poultry netting is out and the 
new discounts are 50 and 5 off list price. 



MONTREAL HARDWARE MARKETS 

Montreal, August 9. — Local hardware 
trade appears to have suffered a slight 
reaction this week. At any rate, the 
activity is not so strenuous as it was 
ten days ago. It is not right that we 
should always look for a booming busi- 
ness. It would not be good in the long 
run. 

These statements apply only to the 
wholesale business. . Manufacturers are 
very busy. Orders are piling up on them 
and it is only by keeping everlastingly 
at it that they will be able to cope with 
the demand. The makers of screws, 
nails, nuts, and bolts are in a better- 
condition, although it will take a few- 
months yet to render conditions entire- 
ly satisfactory. 

Next year's list on galvanized poultry 
netting is out. The new discounts are 
50 and 5 per cent. off. Standard poultry 
netting: per roll of fifty yards is now 
listed at $1.50 for 12-inch, $3 for 24- 
inch, $4.50 for 36-inch, and $7.50 for 
60-inch; galvanized after made, $9.50 
per roll of 50 yards, 24 inches wide, and 
$14 for 36-inch. 

Fall Goods. — The outlook for sales of 
sleisrh heaters and sleigh bells is brierht. 
Jobbers here are, however, somewhat 
anxious about this season's business in 
sporting goods, such as skates, hockey 
sticks, and curlers' supplies. Cow-ties 
are experiencing an increasingly strong 

39 



demand. The demand for meal choppers 
good. 
Screws. While the factories are pretty 

well caught up on lai 

•*t ill a serious shortage on the smaller 

Sizes, Supplies of nuts and boll 
Fairij adequate. 

Wire Goods.— In view ol the heav.v di 

'"I winch will shortly commence for 

shipments of nails to the northwest n 
is not likely there will he any surplus 
with the makers for some time to come. 
It is probable there will he a heavy de 
maud lor annealed hay-haling wire this 
fall. Although in the west 1 1 a > crops are 
Light m places, in Quebec it is heavy, 
and the calls for baling wire commenc- 
ing about the end of this month will 
last well on to the close of navigation. 

Building Paper.— The situation is un- 
changed. The demand is .steady, makers 
are busy, and prices are firm. Tarred 
felt is still quoted at $2.25 per 100 
pounds. 

Fire Brick. — In another month or so 
the demand for this will enliven; at pre- 
sent business is quiet. 

Cement. — Concrete and cement block 
architecture is strongly maintaining the 
demand for this. 

Builders' Hardware.— All through the 
season the call for all lines of building 
material and interior fittings lias been 
splendidly maintained. 

Sporting Goods. — Guns and ammuni- 
tion, fishing tackle, and campers' outfits 
are experiencing an increased call this 
season. Orders for fall and winter goods 
are well booked up. Some anxiety is 
expressed by wholesalers for the trade 
this fall in skaters' outfits. 



MONTREAL METAL MARKETS. 

Montreal, Aug. 9— Somewhat of a 
quietness has again settled upon the 
metal trade. Some apprehension is ex- 
pressed in local circles for the pros- 
pects of trade the coming season. The 
outlook is not encouraging. The strin- 
gency of money due to an unusual large 
investment of Canadian money in 
American interests is largely the cause 
of the present darkness. 

American market conditions are weak 
and uncertain. Strikes and holidays 
are helping to aggravate present condi- 
tions. 

The English market is uncertain ow- 
ing to speculation, ft is, however, fair- 
ly strong for this season. A German 
demand seems to have taken the place 
of the American demand for English 
iron Supplies continue to decrease. 

Pig Iron— At the reduced prices a bet- 
ter demand in manv districts is experi- 
enced Since the United States Steel 
Corporation nought 14,000 tons of 
Bessemer pig, practically all of the 
floating supply in the Pittsburg dis- 
trict has gone, and nothing since this 
big transaction has been available for 
less than $22.50 or $22.75. In the ear- 
ly part of the season there was in that 
district about 570,000 tons of pig, now 
there is less than 200,000 tons. Goo 1 
Scotch brands of iron are scarce, and 
prices are strongly maintained. Eng- 
lish prices have again advanced Is. a 
ton. Locally, little change has occurr- 
ed. Good supplies are being received, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



and i e arri\ mi; Pi ices 

diddlesboro, 

I 10 "II . SlIMHIWI 

lee 

tnt'imony— Contran t « > anticipations 
I'! k i ■ ,nr becoming linnei No chang 
cs, i recorded Hi i ^ week 

Ingol Copper— Locally, tins is i 
( 'onsumei oppei in t be l nil ed 

n in buy, although lowei 
mill- have in-ill uamed, and the pro- 
ducers are anxious sellers. In Canada, 
as well as in the United stairs, pro 
- are oi bbe opinion thai there 
will !>c no pronounced improvement in 
tin- copper trade until financial condi- 
impro' i- Prices are weak and un- 
j ed . 

oil Tin— 'Continues weak. A gener- 
lietness prevails in American cir- 
cles Premiums are low . and little de- 
mand exist: Lamb, and flag and 
strait II quol ed a1 $44. 

Sheet ZMnC — Is weal. 

Zlinc Spelter— Is weak 
Lead— The demand is moderate. 
Old Material*— The market is still 
very quiet. A general decline in prices 
is made this week. Heav] copper and 
wire I6c light copper, 15c; heavy red 
brass l lc; beavj yellow brass. I 
No. l wrought iron, $15.0(1 stove 
plate, $12 00 



TORONTO METAL MARKETS. 

Toronto, Aug. 9 — Very little buying 
■ lling is being done in the local 
metal markets, and with the exception 
oi old materials, prices continue much 
is 1 week. Generally speak- 
ing, both the British and American 
metal markets are dull and inactive, 
and the quietness of the local market is 
but a natural reflection of the situation 
in the primary markets of supply. What 

little business lhal is being here done 
etals is of the sorl ing order \ ai ie- 
uil jobbers do not expect the mar- 
ket to show much activity lor a month 
or six weeks vet. However, as local 
dealers did an exceptionally heavy busi- 
ness right up till t lie time when the 
present mid-summer lull struck the 
trade, "tnc\ are not grumbling now, but 
are content to wait until trade picks 
up again, which it undoubtedly will 
some time in September. 

Antimony— The local market is dull 
and inactive, the price remaining fairly 
steady at figures last quoted. The 
\merican market, however, has a bet- 
ter look Hi in at an) nine in month:., 
and many think the hoi torn has been 
reached Hut there is very Ml tie intei 
esi shown \ et in the way of purchases. 

Pig Iron— There is practically nothing 
doing on the local market, and prices 
remain unchanged. 

Tin— Verj few enquiries are coming in 
and local pi ir. a Iti 

no general decline has been made still 
i la- i. one large local jobber is 

quoting ingol tin from $43.50 to $ 1 1 , 
that tin- tendency ol Ha- n, 

OWn Ward. The London market 

i miies dull and ihe American mar v e1 
con! inues to have an easier tendency 

bu1 the p] ice oi t in there may be said 
lo be holding very veil in view of the 
extreme dullness and the weak and un- 
settled condition of nearly all commer 
cial and financial markets. 

1. 1 1 has undergone a 
slight decline in the local marked dur- 
ing the past week, and imported pig 



lead is now quoted here at $5.35 in.sie.id 
ilrin. mil l.n lead is limit 
ed and the market is exl remedy dull, 
i opper— Since the decline of last week 

l here has been no Change iii local pi lees 

n hi< I comtpai ath eh stead] a1 

the reduced figures. Concerning the 
Vmerii it is noticeable that 

I he eon iumpf ion "I eoppei has slacken 
ed up a bit there, but Ihe deeiease is 
til 1 1 > colniii ii- Bted h\ I he declining pi o 
duet ion. 

Old Materials — Business continues 

quiet on the local market, and conse- 
quent!} iiitthei reductions in price have 
place during the week llea\\ 
COppei and wire has declined |c. and is 

now quoted at L6< ii - iii eoppei ha 
dropped one cent and is now quoted at 

lie., heav; red biass has lost Kc, and 
the mallet price is now l.'Uc; yellow 
in,., am! 1 1 Li I i t brass ha\e each declin- 
ed lc. and arc now quoted at lie. and 
7c respective!) , tea lead is \c. lower 

and is now quoted at 3fC. 



LONDON METAL MARKETS. 

London, Aug. (i. — Cleveland warrants 
are quoted at 57s 9-d, and Glasgow 
standards at 5fis 9d, making prices as 
compared with last week, on Cleveland 

warrants lid higher, and on Glasgow 
standards 5d higher. 

Tin. Spot tin opened easy at 1.17!', 
futures at £178 - r )s, and alter sales oi 
180 tons spot and 280 tons futures, 
closed easy at LI 78 lbs lor spot and 
i_17H lor Futures, making the price as 
compared with last week £3 5s lowei 
on spot and £2 10s lower on futures. 

('opper. — Spot copper opened weak at 
CHI, futures at £80 15s, after sales of 
250 tons spot and 1.100 tons futures 
closed steady at £84 for spot and £80 
]f)s for futures, making price as com- 
pared with last week £5 lower on spot 
and I I lower on futures. 

Spelter.— The market closed at £22 
12s (id. making price as compared with 
last week 12s 6d lower. 

Lead. — The market closed at €1!) 2s 
(id, making price as compared with last 
week 5s lower. 

U. S. METAL MARKETS. 

Cleveland, ()., Aug. 8— The Iron Trade 
Review to-day says : The demand for 
structural material is strong, and some 
independent interests have been impoi 
taut factors during the past week, 
among the orders taken b) them being 

10,000 tons of steel for ' the Edison 

power plant, New York, and 7, (Hill tons 
for the Hay Foundry. The American 

Bridge Co. will furnish the 20,111111 tons 
Of steel needed to complete tine I'eiin- 
sylvania terminals, the contract basing 
been originally taken by the firm of 
Milliken Bros., now bankrupt. 

While large premiums are not so fre- 
quently [laid for delivery of plates, the 
demand continues strong. A contract 
for steel for another lake Vessel has 
been placed, and it is expected that, or- 
ders for several others will be booked 
shortly. A number of inquiries of good 
size for steel piling are pending in the 
district, and a traction company 
has placed an order for Steel ties. Or- 
ders foi 11,000 tons of standard sec- 
tion:-, foi a steam railroad, and 6,000 
tons for a traction line, which had been 
deferred pending the making of financial 
arrangements, have been placed with 
Ihe Lackawanna Steed Co. 



U.S. IRON AND METAL MARKETS. 
\e ,\ N i.i k ^ug. 8, The Iron Age to 
day says : The July output of coke and 
anthracite pig iron was somewhat dis 
appointing. According to the returns re 
ceived bj the Iron Age, the production 
in July was 2,259,682 tons, which is 
1 I tons per day. as compared with 
2,234,575 tons in June, at the rate of 
74,486 Inns pel day. The steel works 

furnaces were chiefly responsible for this, 
i in output having been 1,452,557 tons 
in July, compared with 1,457,230 tons 

in June. The industry entered the, month 
of August with a capacity of 514,121 

ions per week, as compared with 528,170 
Ions on July .1. 

The strikes in the iron ranges and at 
the docks are practically ended, and it 
i-. estimated that this week 700,000 tons 
of ore will be sent down from the docks 
at the head of the lakes. It may take 

■ > 1 1 1 1 ■ lime, however, before the scatter- 
ed workmen may be collected to get 
back to the former record-breaking rate 
of work. 

While the pig non markets in the east 
are irregular and weak, but show a 
moderate amount of activity, the 
southern ami western markets are very 
dull, because the gnat majority of sell- 
ers refuse to make any concessions 
whatever. This is notably true of the 
southern furnaces. concerning whom 
there is only an occasional whisper of 
weakness. So far as can be judged, the 
rate of melting is as large as it has 
been, but the question, of course, is 
whether t he founders are running along 
under the momentum of a past boom. 

Considering the general impression of 
absolute stagnation in the steel rail 
Made, this week's aggregate of sales of 
about 10,000 tons is not a bad showing. 
Among- the purchases are 10,000 tons 
lor a new road, made in Chicago; 6,000 
tons to the Idaho & Northern, for next 
year; 5,000 tons for the Northern Pa- 
cific, for this year, and 8,000 tons to a 
frog and crossing plant, partly for this 
year's and partly for next year's de- 
livery. 

The mills are reporting an improved 
demand from the car builders, and the 
shipyards have again placed material 
lor two boats. 

In the bar iron trade interest centres 
chiefly in the forthcoming wage scale for 
puddlers and finishers by the Concilia 
lion Hoard appointed to adjust the dif- 
ferences between the Western Bar Iron 
mills and the Amalgamated Associa 
tion. The decision is expected on Sat 
urday. 

Chicago reports that in the structur- 
al trade mill orders and specifications 
are again outstripping the rolling ca- 
pacities. In New York the contract for 
10,000 tons for the new Kdison power 
house h.as been placed. 

The reports from the wire, tube and 
^heet trades continue favorable. 

The markets for old material all over 
Ihe country seem overstocked and prices 
are lower. 



In melting- copper do not allow the 
ends of Ihe ingot, or other form that is 
being melted, to project above the. top 
of the crucible so that charcoal will not 
cover them. They are thus greatly ox- 
idized or "burnt." The castings made 
from "burnt" copper will be weak and 
full of blowholes; 



40 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Travelers, hardware merchants and 
clerks are requested to forward corres- 
pondence regarding the doings of the 
trade and the industrial gossip of their 
town and district. Addressed envelopes. 
stationery, etc.. will be supplied to regu- 
lar correspondents on request. Write 
the Editor for information. 



HALIFAX HAPPENINGS. 

Halifax, Aug. U — The opening of the 
big power plant at the Chignecto coal 
mines iasl week, marks an importaul 
ii. i in Hit' industrial development oi 

\o\a Scotia. It is unique on the 
American continent in thai the powei 
is obtained from coal at the mouth of 
tlic pit, and transmitted over ic. miles 
to the town of Amherst. Lieut-Gover- 
nor Fraser turned the switch which set 
the wheels in motion and man} promi- 
nent engineers from various parts of 
Canada were present at the inaugera- 
tion. The success of the undertaking 
was clearly demonstrated. 

As a result of the installation of this 
plant, manufacturers will be able to ob- 
tain power at a much less cost than 
they are now paying. 

The employment of electric power has 
many advantages ovej the use of steam 
in point of economy, not only in capital 
expenditure for its installation, but in 
cost of running and maintenance. No' 
engine house is required ; engines, boil 
ers and steam pipes arc done away with, 
fireman and engineers air not. required . 
the cost of fuel and water is saved. In- 
stead of all these, an induction motor 
is used, which maj be set in any pat' 
of a building, and costs from $150 for 
Qve hoise power to $1,000 for fifty 
horse power. The usual price of elec- 
tric power developed hydraulically is 
from $25 to $30 per horse power per 
year, while steam power usually may 
be figured at about $60. 

The power house at the mouth of the 
Chignecto mine is a very substantial 
brick structure, (>0 x 21 feet, and 35 
feet high, located about 00 yards from 
the pit mouth. It is lifted up with a 
750-horse power vertical compound en- 
gine, high-speed, 300 revolutions, with 
forced lubrication, and four Itobb En- 
gineering company's boilers of 300 
horse power each. The generator is 
from the Westinghouse company, is of 
500 kilowatts, of 1 he revolving held 
type, wound for three phase currents at 
11,000 volts. Both the engine and gen- 
erator have a capacity for 25 per cent 
over-load The switchboard consists of 
the usual instruments, lighting arres- 
ters, etc., and is also from the Westing 
house company. 

The transmission line is six and a half 
miles in length in a straight line to Am- 
herst, and consists of three No. 1 cop- 
ner wires, run on cedar poles and en- 
tering the sub-station, Amherst High- 
lands, near the Amherst Malleable Iron 
Works. 

The Amherst sub-station consists <.i 
,i brick two-storey building with con- 
crete base. The first storey con 1 
the low pressure or 2,000-volt gear, and 
the second storey the 11.000-volt 
Here the current is transformed from 
11,000 to 2,000-volts, by three Westing- 
house transformers of 150 kilowatts 



each, i he \ oltage ol 2,000 ben 

1 1 ibution in i he i onsumei s ol \ irahei it 

'l he buiMin i .iii i 1 1 ■ ■ : i ■ -i i o and \ mliei :l 
w ci , built bj .1 \ Kage, conl ract oi . 

viniiclsl 

\. t Chignecto the coal is conveyed 
from the pit mouth bj mechanical con 

'■ '\ iiis to a coal Inn al the bollei house, 

• i distance ol about thntv five yards, 

ii" ii Which il ascends m chutes to the 

mechanical I oke s, w Inch are of i he 

• tones type. Ashes ami clinkers are al 
SO taken a w a \ bv means ol conveyors 

The people required to man the 
tern are:— An engineer for the daj stiifl 
and one for the night shift , two lire 
men lor day and one for night, and a 
cleaner, all at ChigneCito Two linemen, 
always ready for repaii work, by da) 
oi night. At Amherst, one person, 
principally for telephone. \ superinten- 
dent has charge ol the entire power 
system. 

The following is an example of the 
manner in which power may be used in 
a large factory : — Rhodes, Curry & Co. 
have taken 200 horse power to supple- 
ment the present power in their cai 
works. At different points in the works 
are placed ten or twelve motors of ten 
to forty-horse power each, for driving 
fans, blowers, shafting, cranes, etc., 
some working on 2,000 and some on 220 
volts The company has three large 
transformers of its own, of forty kilo- 
watts each, which are for the purpose 
of reducing the pressure from 2,000 to 
220 volts for the protection of the Work- 
men in cases where they are likely to 
come in close proximity to the wires. 

The capacity at present is 1,000 horse 
power ; but in order to ensure the effec- 
tiveness of the plant under all circum- 
stances, it is intended bo duplicate it 
at an early date, with the exception of 
the wiring, which is capable of trans- 
mitting 3,000 horse power. By duplica- 
tion, an acoident to the machinery could 
be overcome in a few minutes. The 
energy which it starts to supply is (J00 
horse power. 

The following are the officers and the 
directorate of this enterprising com- 
pany :— President . Senator William Mit- 
chell, Montreal: vice-president, Nat. 
Curry, Amherst ; secretary-treasurer, 
Walter (I. Mitchell, Montreal ; manager, 
David Mitchell, Chignecto , directors, 
William Kwiic' Montreal; I). Smith, 
stock raiser Montreal ; Mr. Dunn, M.P., 
Ontario. 

During the inauguration proceedings, 
the following telegram from Thos. A. 
Edison, the famous inventor, was read : 

" Orange. N.J., Julv 31, P>07. 
"I! .1. Logan, M.P. 
" Chairman Hoard of Trade Committee. 

"Permit me to congratulate your 
Hoard and Senator Mitchell on the in- 
auguration of the first plant on the 
American continent for the generating 
of electricity at the mouth of a coal 
mine, and the distribution of the same 
to distant commercial centres. It is a 
bold attempt am! I never thought it 
would be first accomplished in Nova 
Scotia, where my father was born over 
one hundred years ago. 

(Signed) " THOMAS A. EDISON." 



SITUATION VACANT. 



SALESMAN WANTED, experienced man, one with a 
knowledge of glass business preferred. Reply by 
letter or in person. Consolidated Plate Glass Com- 
pany, Toronto. 

41 



SCENIC ST. JOHN. 

St, John, N. I'... Augusl 6. St. 
John merchants are Looking forward 
with interest to the 21s1 and 22nd 

of (Ins month, when the annual meeting 

|'l I lie Maril ime Hoard of Trade w ill be 
held here. The whole of (he lirsl day 
."lid one hall' of the second will Ik- de 
voted io the discussion of issues which 
are of vital importance to the proj 
and prosperity of the Maritime Prov 

These discussions will be taken 

pari in by the most active business men 
from all sections ami should prove of 
deep interest. 

The delegates, of whom then' ai i 
pected lo be more than a hundred, will 
be widl looked after by a rccepl inn cum 

mittee from the local board, who ana 
making arrangements I'm' their proper 
enter! ainment. 

There will probably be an excursion on 
the river mi the afternoon of the second 
day. and a good lime is looked lor. \\ 
s. Fisher, the president, is working en- 
ergetically lo make this year's eonven- 

tim e ol' I he best yet held. There will 

be many subjects of interest presented 
for discussion. 



It is expected that the winter porl 
business of 1907-08 will be greater than 
ever before. The Allan line steamers 
will make weekly sailings, also the C. 
P. IC. Donaldson. Manchester, Bead. 
Furness, South African and West Indian 

services. About loll sailings are prom- 
ised. 

II. (I. Hunter, civil engineer, who has 
been engaged on the water extension sys- 
lem here lor the past I wo years, has ac- 
cepted a position as one of the assistant 
engineers mi the water extension system 
ae New Vmk. and will leave shortly to 
lake up bis new duties. 

The corner stone of the new $00,000 
y.M.C.A. building mi Chipman Hill, was 
laid on Wednesday. July 31, by his wor- 
ship. Mayor Sears. The work of con- 
st met ion is proceeding very satisfae 
torily. 

At a meeting of the civic board of 
works last week, it was decided that a 
tender for tar to be used for asphalt 
sidewalks, be nol accepted, as the juice 
$."... ">(l a barrel, was considered exorbitant 
The only tenderer was the Carritte, Pat- 
terson Co., who control the tar output 
of the Maritime Provinces. Under a 
previous call lor lenders they had offer 
ed to supply the tar for $2.25 a barrel 
but would not agree to take half the con- 
tract, i he St. John Ry. Co. taking the 
other half. The city fathers, rat her than 
submil to what they termed a hold-up 
have decided to i ry and purchase else- 
where or lo put down concrete side 
walks. 

The town of Woodstock. N.H.. suffered 

from a severe lire on Wednesday last 
when the buildings occupied by the 
Baird Company, wholesale druggists: 
Sheasgreen Drug Co.. and Troy's res- 
ult, were burned. The tire started 
from the crossing of electric light and 
telephone wires. The rtaird .Co.s ' loss 
amounted lo over $15,000, fairly cover- 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



oil by insurance, bul the oilier concerns' 
Lose was not verj great. One of theflre- 
men, Charles McKinney, was killed by 
coming in contact with a live electric 
wire. 



KINGSTON KINETOSCOPE. 

Kingston, Aug. 5. Business continues) 
rather brisk here still as it has been 
doing foi some time past, especially in 
all hues of sporting and seasonable 
goods. The merchants have done an ex 
(.optionally good trade in all lines ol 
builder- supplies all spring, and in such 
line.-, a- paint-, oils, glass, etc., they 
ha\e done remarkably well, but the 
rush is beginning to quiet down a little 
now. All our hardware stores keep open 
each day until six o'clock. The boot and 
shoe, gents' furnishings and dry goods 
- all close at live o'clock each "ev- 
ening during the summer months. The 
hardware dealers keep the same time 
here the year round. 

The employes of the Canadian Loco 
motive Works intend holding- a huge 
picnic at Lake Ontario Park on Satur- 
day. August 10th, the proceeds to be 
equally divided between the Hotel Dieu 
and General Hospitals here. Fine 
weather is being looked forward to aim 
large crowds are expected to be present 
on this occasion to help make it a grand 
success as it is for the good of these 
two charitable institutions. 

The annual meeting of the 

shareholders of the Kingston, 

Portsmouth and Cataraqui Electric 
Railway Company was called to meet 
at the secretary's office, Ontario Street, 
on the 31st of July, but was on that 
date postponed until October 11th, 
some of the shareholders not being pre- 
sent. 

A meeting of the creditors of George 
Sears, hardware merchant, this city, 
was held one day last week in the office 
of the assignee, J. B. Walkem. It was 
decided at that meeting to offer the 
stock for sale by tender; in the mean- 
time, Mr. Sears may make an offer. 
Some years ago this business was car- 
ried on under the name of John Muckle- 
stone & Co., and at that time they did 
an exceptionally large trade and employ- 
ed about twenty-seven men, many of 
whom are now our leading hardware 
merchants. -It seems a shame to see such 
a good business as this fall through, but 
for some time it has been steadily de- 
creasing but no advertising whatever was 
done to help build it up again, and at 
last an assignment had to be made. 
The business was under the name of 
Muckiestone until about seven or eight 
years ago, when Mr. Sears took it over, 
the latter having been an employe some 
twenty-five years before. Subsequently 
Mr. Sears left for the States, 
where he remained for some time. 
On returning again he went into 
partnership with Mr. Muckh 
and finally took over the business 
under his own name when Mr. Muckie- 
stone went out of it. 



James Swift, general manager of the 
Collingwood Shipbuilding- Company, 
Collingwood, formerly of Garden Island, 
is renewing old acquaintances in this 



district. "Sunny Jim," as he is known 
by all his old friends, is receiving a 
warm welcome. Another vfsitoi to the 
citj over Sundaj was Oscar Johnson. 
invoice clerk for the Queen City Oil Co., 
Toronto. 

Tenders are being called here by the 
eount\ clerk for the construction of the 
abutments ami concrete floor for the new 
steel bridge to be erected at Grass Lake 
in the Township of Kingston. 

• • 

• 

On Tuesday evening, while riding home 
to supper on a bicycle with a friend, 
one of our leading hardwaremen met 
with a slight accident which he is likely 
to remember for a few days, when near 
the city buildings he was about to go 
on the sidewalk when suddenly his front 
wheel struck the walk, which was con- 
siderably higher than he had anticipated, 
throwing him with great force to the 
asphalt pavement below. Luckily no 
bcnies were broken and with the excep- 
tion of a few scratches and bruises he 
escaped further injury and is once more 
in the ring with the same happy smile 
as before, Looking little the worse for 
his experience. 

* * 
• 

Tenders were called here a short time 
ago for the rebuilding of the Tete du 
pont barracks, built here in 1672, the 
soldiers at present being away at Peta- 
wawa. The work was to have been done 
while they were absent, but a number of 
times there have been rumors afloat 
that the Grand Trunk Railway Co. had 
made offers for this site and would build 
a freight station there. A rumor of this 
nature was current lately and either it 
was this reason or that the contract- 
ors' cheques were returned on account 
of the tenders being too high, that 
the contracts have not been awarded. 
New contracts will probably be called 
for. 



There has been a great demand for all 
kinds of motor boat supplies here this 
season, many merchants and residents 
having purchased gasoline launches, and 
the local builders have received con- 
tracts in quick succession. It seems at 
present as though the sailing yacht 
would almost be done away with in the 
near future, many people with smaller 
boats are having engines installed, and 
"put-puts" are to be heard in every di- 
rection on the water now. This greatly 
increases the business of the hardware- 
men, who keep on hand a goodly supply 
of goods needed for that purpose. 

There have been several large wagons 
about the city the past few days adver- 
tising the "Comfort Range." They travel 
through the country around here taking 
orders and in some cases taking the 
farmers' old stoves as part payment. 
One farmer was rejoicing the other day 
because a traveler had called on him and 
offered to take his old stove at a re- 
duction of $20 on the new one. Tie 
bought the new stove but they never 
called back to remove the old one and 
he now has the new stove with the re- 
duction of the $20 and also his old 
stove. One of these wagons met with a 
mishap one evening while crossing the 
Street Railway Co.'s tracks, one of the 
rear wheels was wrenched off. the driver 
being thrown from his hierh seat and re- 
ceiving a bad shnkini' up, but otherwise 
escaping serious injury. 

42 



Civic Holiday was observed by the 
people of this city on .Monday last and 
was proclaimed tnrougnoul the city as 
a public holiday. The annual, homecom- 
ing of the old boys and girls from To- 
ronto was celebrated and on the Satur- 
day evening previous a warm welcome 
was given them on their arrival by the 
citizens, with the 11th regimental band 
playing 'Hume, Sweet Home." It was 
estimated that close upon 960 people 
were on the train, made up of thirteen 
coaches. A band concert was given in 
their honor on the market square that 
evening, and another in Macdonald 1'ark 
on Sunday evening was attended by 
several thousand people. Monday was an 
ideal day for the \isitors, who took in 
the many picnics and excursions held. 
Among some of the features of the day- 
were baseball and lacrosse in the morn- 
ing and an excursion among the Thou- 
sand Islands in the afternoon, the boat 
being crowded. The local Catholic Irish 
societies held a picnic at Lake Ontario 
Park at which a Jarge number were pre- 
sent. The old boys from Ottawa were 
here the week before to spend Sunday, 
when two band concerts were given, and 
also took in what excursions were being 
held on Sunday. There were reduced 
rates on the Grand Trunk on both oc- 
casions. 



WIDE AWAKE WOODSTOCK. 

Woodstock, Aug. 6.— An American con- 
cern, which desires to establish a 
branch factory in Western Ontario for 
the manufacture of brass goods, is con- 
ducting negotiations with the city coun- 
cil and board of trade, and the officials 
are hopeful of landing the industry, 
which seems like a good one, for Wood- 
stock. 

Hardly a day passes but what one or 
more letters are received by the civic 
authorities, asking what inducements 
would be offered manufacturers to locate 
here. Most of them are from Ameriean 
promoters. Some of them are of course 
genuine, and the writers really desire to 
build a factory somewhere, but very 
many are the outcome of wildcat 
schemes, ana the problem is to pick out 
those worth while. Almost every town 
and city has had some experience with 
manufactories brought to the munici- 
pality by a loan or other inducements, 
which failed to make good, and left the 
plant and business to fall hack into the 
hands of the town, sometimes entailing 
a considerable loss. Eternal vigilance is 
the price of safety. 



One valuable new industry is all but 
landed for Woodstock. It is a milk con- 
densing plant which would employ a large 
number of hands, and have a capacity 
of one hundred thousand pounds of milk 
per day. The promoters are the Borden 
Condensed Milk Company, of New York, 
who have a large number of branches 
across the line. They propose to erect 
another plant in Western Ontario, in 
addition to the one at Ingersoll. Ne- 
gotiations are proceeding very satisfac- 
torily and it is probable that a bylaw 
providing for the concessions will be 
submitted to the people in a few weeks. 
The company ask for a free site, free 
sewer connection, exemption from taxa- 
tion for all save school purposes, for 
ten years. 

Active steps are being taken for the 
erection of a new city hall for Wood- 



II V.RD W A K E A N I) M ET A I. 



stock. II is not before a new one is 
needed, for t he si ructure at pre tent 
serving in that capacity has been anti- 
quated Eor years past. The people will 
be given an opportunity of voting on 
tin' question next January. 



The new building which . lours Bros., 
cigar manufacturers, arc erecting, is 
nearly completed. It is a handsome 
three-storey structure. On the street 
floor will be a cigar retail store and 
pool rooms, and the remainder of the 
building will be devoted to manufactur- 
ing purposes. 



LEAFY LONDON. 

London, August 7. 

That there is need fur real organiza- 
tion and agreement among the retail 
hardware dealers of London, whereby 
living prices Eor goods of all kinds might 
be maintained, is every day becoming 
more apparent. As it is, merchants 
"hoe their own row/' and in order to 
gel business do not hesitate to cut prices 
to a ruinous degree. Much of this price- 
cutting' is in the nature of baits, where- 
by the unsuspecting' housekeeper is al- 
lured to a store as a result of the adver- 
tising of certain articles at prices away 
below their actual value. An instance of 
this was furnished during the past week. 
One dealer put out the bait in his ad- 
vertisement in the daily papers that he 
was offering charcoal irons, the regular 
Belling price of which is $1. at 75 cents 
each. Then out came another merchant 
with the announcement that in his store 
the same iron could be got for 60 cents. 
Where this sort of thing will end — whe- 
ther it will ultimately lead to dealers 
offering to throw in a charcoal iron with 
every pound of nails, or something as 
ridiculous, it is hard to say; but it is 
certain that if dealing in hardware is 
to continue a profitable business in Lon- 
don something must be done, and thai 
right soon, to bring these price-cutters to 
their senses. 



One of London 's most enterprising and 
progressive firms is that of Wortman & 
Ward. In 1879 Win. H. Wortman start- 
ed in business with a capital of $350; 
to-day he is at the head of one of the 
largest concerns of the kind in the coun- 
'try. with business connections extending 
to various parts of the world. Among 
the articles manufactured by this firm 
are revolving barrel churns, washing 
machines, iron pumps, pump cylinders 
of brass and iron, horse hay forks, pea 
harvesters, wagon skeins and miscel- 
laneous castings. The fame of Wortman 
& Ward's goods has spread over four 
continents, for besides doing business in 
every section of Canada, they find profit- 
able markets in England, Australia 
South Africa and New Zealand. Their 
extensive establishment in the eastern 
pari of the city is up-to-date in every 
particular, the entire buildings being 
lGOx'250 feet. The front section is three 
storeys in height and 50x250 feet, and 
the foundry is a one-storey structure, 
about 100x200 feet. From ninety to one 



hundred men ft re constant ly employ i 
the various departments. In the foundry 
some twentj molders are in use and six- 
Ions of metal are niched everj day. One 

cause, :iml no uiiimporl ant one, either, of 

Wortman Ox Ward's success is their 
straightforward business methods, and 

another is that they keep abreast, of the 
times in their various lines of manufac- 
ture. The business is steadily growing 
and it would surprise no one to learn 

before long that it has reached Buch dl 

meiisions as to necessitate an enlarge- 
ment of the firm's already very large es- 
lablishinetit. When that time comes 
Wortman & Ward will be prepared to 

meet it. 



The two L. & K. test boring machines 
manufactured by the Scott Manufactur- 
ing Company, of this city, for the Trans- 
continental Railway, have proven most 
satisfactory and the general adoption of 
these machines by those requiring them 
is considered almost certain. The local 
firm have filled an order for one of them 
to the C.P.R., and to-morrow will ship 
one for use by the Dominion Department 
of Public Works. The prospects are that 
there will be more to follow. 



Business is fairly good in hardware 
circles. Travelers are still off on their 
holidays, and the result is unusually 
large mail and telephone orders. 

* 

The employes of the Jackson Manu- 
facturing Company and their friends. 
numbering about two hundred in all, held 
their annual picnic at Springbank park 
vesterdav. 



have found it an advant 

have metal parts in the tread 
t he ends o in conl act wit h the 

tire, because the metal being a good 
radiator, helps to carry oil the hi 



MALAYSIAN TIN OUTPUT. 

The following tabic, furnished by 
Vice-Consul-Oeneral G. E. Chamberlin, 
of Singapore, shows the output of tin 
from the Federated Malay States for 
the first four months of the years 190^ 
and 1907. The figures represent tons of 
2,2 '(i pounds. 

1906 1907 

Perak 8,076 8,187 

Selaneror 5,255 5,067 

Negri Sembilan 1,500 1.386 

Pahang 636 623 

Total 1.7.167 15.263 

Decrease -0 1 

It will be noticed that there is a 
falling off from last year's output of 
204 tons. However, this is a slight 
gain for the months of March and 
April, as Januarv and February showed 
a decrease of 272 tons. 



WHY RUBBER TIRES GET HOT. 

When an automobile is running- at high 
sneed the rubber tires are rapidly warm- 
ed, and the heat sometimes becomes 
wr\ 'Meat, with resultant injury to the 
rubber. The cause of this accumulation 
of heat in the tire is ascribed to the 
kneading of the rubber, which generates 
heat faster than it can be radiated 
away. For this reason manufacturers 

43 



A RARE FIND. 

A Danish philologist browsing in a 

convent in Constantinople recently dis- 
covered a manuscript of the < 
geometrician ami practical inventor, 

Archimedes, who had a monopoly of the 
ha nl ware trade ill screws and levers in 
Athens, who shouted "Eureka" long be- 
fore Longfellow's unknown cried " Kx 
celsior," and who mastered the differ- 
ence between the subjective and the ob- 
jective sufficiently to announce B.C. that 
if he only had a place to put his lever 
he could move the world. Savants are 
now on tenterhooks to know whether 
the manuscript is poetry or prose, a new 
stiff problem in Q. E. D. or a claim to 
recognition at I he Athenian patent of- 
fice.' 



NEW BRASS FACTORY. 

The Turner Brass Works, of Chicago, 
have completed their new factory at. 
Sycamore, 111., and are now occupying it. 
The main factory building 1ms a floor 
space of 411.000 square feet, with power 
and heating plants additional. Improv- 
ed machinery has been installed and. 
their facilities enlarged and greatly im- 
proved. They are located on the main 
line of the Chicago & Great Western 
Ry. and the Galena division of the Chi- 
cago & Northwestern Ry., with side- 
tracks to the factory. As soon as com- 
pletely settled, all orders will be shipped 
promptly. All correspondence and or- 
ders should be sent to the main office. 
Svcamore, 111. 



TOUGHENING METALS. 

In a novel method of toughening 

nut a Is lately introduced the metal to 
be treated is placed in a closed retort 
with a small quantity of mercury, says 
the London Engineer. The retort is sub- 
jected to pressure, and as it is heated 
I" a point below melting temperature, 
a current of electricitv is passed through 
the metal. Besides increased toughness, 
greater resistance to sea-water corro- 
sion is imparted. The hardening is es 
pecially adapted for iron and steel, but 
is claimed to be useful for other metal- 



LARGEST CHAINS IN THE WORLD. 

The heaviest work ever done in the 
chainmaking industry is the moorinsr 
chain made for the two new Canard 
steamships Maurctania and Lusitania. 
now beincr constructed at Pontypridd, 
South Wales. The links are made from 
Ij and 53-inch iron and weierh from 243 
to 336 pounds each. The swivel connec- 
tion weighs 4.485 pounds, and each 
shackle weighs 711 pounds. The anchors 
will weierh twelve tons apiece. The 

chains are 720 feet long, and the entire 

I- rint;- will weigh altogether about 

200 tons. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA HARDWARE AND METAL MARKETS 

Correi'lftl l>y irli'iiraph uf id II >.m. Friday Aug 9. Room 511, I'niim >!nnk Bldg, Winnipeg, Man. 

Crop reports are more favorable now than ror some weeks, and the trade arc 
in more bopeful mood. A sood average sorting trade is being done and the vol- 
ume of bu considered quite satisfactory toi an ordinarily quiet month 



ROPE— Sisal, lie. per lb., and pure 
manila, 15|c. 

LANTERNS— Cold blast, per dozen, 

coppered, $9; dash, $9. 
WIRE— Barbed wire, 100 lbs., $3.22A ; 
plain galvanized, 6, 7 and 8, $3.70; No. 

9, $3.25; No. 10, $3.70; No. 11, $3.S0; 
No. 12, $3.45; No. 13, $3.55; No. 14, 
$4; No. 15, $4.25; No. 16, $4.40; plain 
twist. $3.45; staples, $3.50; oiled an- 
nealed wire, 10, $2.90; 11, $2.96; 12, 
$3.04; 13, $3.14; 14, $3.24; 15, $3.39; 
annealed wires (unoiled), 10c. less; soft 
copper wire, base, 36c. ; brass spring 
wire, base, 30c. 

POULTRY' NETTING— The discount is 
now 47£ per cent, from list price, in- 
stead of 50 and 5 as formerly. 

HORSESHOES— Iron, No. to No. 1, 
$4.65; No. 2 and larger, $4.40; snow- 
shoes, No. to No. 1, $4.90; No. 2 and 
larger, $4.65; steel, No. to No. 1, $5; 
No. 2 and larger, $4.75. 

HORSENAILS— No. 10 and larger, 22c; 
No. 9, 24c; No. 8, 24c; No. 7, 26c; 
No. 6, 28c; No. 5, 30c; No. 4, 36c 
per lb. Discounts : " C " brand, 40, 10,10 
and 7^ p.c; "M.R.M." cold forged pro- 
cess, 50 and 5 p.c. Add 15c per box. 
Capewell brand, quotations on applica- 
tion. 

WIRE NAILS.— $3 f.o.b. Winnipeg, 
and $2.55 f.o.b. Fort William. 

CUT NAILS— Now $3.20 per keg. 

PRESSED SPIKES — I x 5 and 6, 
$4.75; 5-6 x 5, 6 and 7, $4.40; § x 6, 7 
and 8, $4.25; 7-16 x 7 and 9, $4.15; h x 
8, 9, 10 and 12, $4.05; f x 10 and 12, 
$3.90. All other lengths 25c extra net. 

SCREWS— Flat head, iron bright, 80, 

10, 10 and 10 ; round head, iron, 80 ; 
flat head, brass, 75 ; round head, brass, 
70 ; coach, 70. 

NUTS AND BOLTS — Bolts, car- 
riage, | or smaller, 60 p.c; bolts, car- 
riage, 7-16 and up, 50; bolts, machine, 
f and under, 50 and 5; bolts, machine, 
7-16 and over, 50; bolts, tire, 65; bolt 
ends, 55; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 and 10; 
machine screws, 70; plough bolts, 55; 
square nuts, cases, 3 ; square nuts, small 
lots, 2$; hex nuts, cases, 3; hex nuts, 
small lots, 1\ p.c. Stove bolts, 70 and 
10 p.c 

RIVETS — Iron, 60 and 10 p.c. ; cop. 
per, No. 7, 43c; No. 8, 42}c; No. 9, 
45£c; copper, No. 10, 47c; copper, No. 
12, 50$c. ; assorted, No. 8, 44Jc, and 
No. 10, 48c 

COIL CHAIN — J-in., $7.25; 5-16, 
15.75; 8, $5.25; 7-16, $5; |, $4.75; 9-16, 
$4.70; |, $4.65; f. $4.65. 

SHOVELS — List has advanced $1 per 
dozen on all spades, shovels and scoops. 

HARVEST TOOLS— 60 anJ 5 p.c 

AXE HANDLES— Turned, s.g. hick- 
roy, doz., $3.15; No. 1, $1.90; No. 2, 
$1.60; octagon extra, $2.30; No. 1, $1.60. 

AXES — Bench axes, 40 ; broad axes, 
25 p.c. discount off list; Royal Oak, per 



doz., $6.25; Maple Leaf, $8.25; Model, 
$8.50; Black Prince, $7.25; Black Dia- 
mond, $9.25; Standard flint edge, $8.75; 
Copper King, $8.25; Columbian, $9.50; 
handled axes, North Star, $7.75; Black 
Prince, $9.25; Standard flint edge, 
$10.75; Copper King, $11 per dozen. 

CHURNS— 45 and 5; list as follows: 
No. 0, $9; No. 1, $9; No. 2, $10; No. 
3, $11; No. 4, $13; No. 5, $16. 

AUGER BITS— "Irwin" bits, 474 
per cent., and other lines 70 per cent. 

BLOCKS— Steel blocks, 35; wood, 55. 

FITTINGS — Wrought couplings, 60 ; 
nipples, 65 and 10; T.'s and elbows, 10; 
malleable bushings, 50; malleable un- 
ions, 55 p.c. 

HINGES— Light "T" and strap, 65. 

HOOKS — Brush hooks, heavy, per 
doz., $8.75; grass hooks, $1.70. 

STOVE PIPES— 6-in., per 100 feet 
length, $9; 7-in., $9.75. 

TINWARE, ETC.— Pressed, retinned, 
70 and 10; pressed, plain, 75 and 2J; 
pieced, 30; japanned ware, 374; enamel- 
led ware, Famous, 50; Imperial, 50 and 
10; Imperial, one coat, 60; Premier, 50; 
Colonial, 50 and 10; Royal, 60; Vic- 
toria, 45; White, 45; Diamond, 50; 
Granite, 60 p.c. 

GALVANIZED WARE — Pails, 374 
per cent. ; other galvanized lines, 30 per 
cent. 

CORDAGE — Rope sisal, 7-16 and 
larger, basis, $11.25; Manilla, 7-16 and 
larger, basis, $16.25; Lathyarn, $11.25; 
cotton rope, per lb., 21c 

SOLDER— Quoted at 27c per pound. 
Block tin is quoted at 45c per pound. 

WRINGERS— Royal Canadian, $36 ; 
B.B., $40.75 per dozen, 

FILES — Arcade, 75; Black Diamond, 
60; Nicholson's, 624 p.c. 

LOCKS— Peterboro and Gurney, 40 
per cent. 

BUILDING PAPER— Anchor, plain, 
66c ; tarred, 69c. ; Victoria, plain, 71c ; 
tarred, 84c ; No. 1 Cyclone, tarred. 84c ; 
No. 1 Cyclone, plain, 66c; No. 2 Joli- 
ette, tarred, 69c; No. 2 Joliette plain, 
51c; No. 2 Sunrise, plain, 56c 

AMMUNITION, ETC. — Cartridges, 
rim fire, 50 and 5; central fire, 334 P-c; 
military, 10 p.c. advance. Loaded shells: 
12 gauge, black, $16.50; chilled, 12 
gauge, $17.50; soft, 10 gauge, $19.50; 
chilled, 10 gauge, $20.50. Shot: ordin- 
ary, per 100 lbs., $7.75; chilled, $8.10. 
Powder: F.F., keg, Hamilton, $4.75; 
F.F.O., Dupont's, $5. 

REVOLVERS — The Iver Johnson 
revolvers have been advanced in price). 
the basis for revolver with hammer be- 
ing $5.30 and for the hammerless $5.95. 

IRON AND STEEL— Bar iron basis, 
$2.70. Swedish iron basis, $4.95; sleigh 
shoe steel, $2.75; spring steel, $3.25; 

44 



TO MAKE AN 
IDEAL PAINT 

that will stand the 
trying weather con- 
ditions of Western 
Canada has been our 
object. 




HOUSE PAINT 

is our attainment — 
it is right because 



ITH- WELL 



It is always in stock! 

You would have 
no difficulty in prov- 
ing this, by ordering 
at once any of 
the numerous shades. 
It is a paint that has 
become a favorite 
with hundreds of 
retailers, because it 
has always pleased 
their customers. 

G.F. Stephens & Co. 

Limited 
PAINT MAKERS 

WINNIPEG and CALGARY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANTELS 

GRATES, FIREPLACE: TRIMMINGS, TILEING, SHOW CASES. 
BANK, BAR AND INTERIOR STORE FITTINGS 

Winnipeg Paint — Glass CI 



Limited 



CALGARY 



WINNIPEG 



machinery steel, $3.50; tool steel, Black 
Diamond, 100 lbs., $9.50; Jessop, $13. 

SHEET ZINC— $8.50 for cask lots, 
and $9 for broken lots. 

CORRUGATED IRON AND ROOF- 
ING, ETC.— Corrugate iron 28 gauge 
painted $3, galvanized $4.10; 26 gauge 
$3.35 and $4.35. Pressed standing 
seamed roofing 28 gauge painted $3.10, 
galvanized $4.20; 26 gauge $3.45 and 
$4.45. Crimped roofing 28 gauge paint- 
ed $3.20, galvanized, $4.30; 26 gauge 
$3.55 and $4.55. 

PIG LEAD — Average price is $6. 

COPPER — Planished copper, 44c. per 
lb. ; plain, 39c. 

IRON PIPE AND FITTINGS— Black 
pipe, i-in., $2.65; 1, $2.80; i, $3.50; f, 
$4.40; 1, $6.35; 1L $8.65; li, $10.40; 
2, $13.85; 2i, $19; 3, $25. Galvanized 
iron pipe, f-in., $3.75; I, $4.35; }, $5.65; 
1, $8.10; 1L $11; U, $13.25; 2-inch, 
$17.65. Nipples, 70 and 10 per cent.; 
unions, couplings, bushings and plugs, 
60 per cent. 

GALVANIZED IRON — Apollo, 16- 
gauge, $4.15 ; 18 and 20, $4.40 ; 22 and 
24, $4.65 ; 26, $4.65; 28, $4.50; 30 gauge 
or 10£-oz., $5.20 ; Queen's Head, 20 
$4.60,; 24 and 26, $4.90 ; 28, $5.15. 

LEAD PD?E— Market is firm at $7.80. 

TIN PLATES— IC charcoal, 20 x 28, 
box, $10; LX charcoal, 20 x 28, $12; 
XXI charcoal, 20 x 28, $14. 

TERNE PLATES— Quoted at $9.50. 

CANADA PLATES — 18 x 21, 18 x 
24, $3.50; 20 x 28, $3.80; full polished, 
$4.30. 

LUBRICATING OILS— 600W, cylin- 
ders, 80c; capital cylinders, 55c. and 
50c; solar red engine, 30c; Atlantic red 
engine, 29c; heavy castor, 28c; medium 
castor. 27c ; ready harvester, 28c. ; stan- 
dard hand separator oil, 35c; standard 
gas engine oil, 35c per gallon. 

PETROLEUM AND GASOLENE — 
Silver Star, in bbls., per gal., 20c; Sun- 
light, in bbls., per gal., 22c; per case, 
$2.35; Eocene, in bbls., per gal., 24c; 
per case, $2.50 ; Pennoline, in bbls., per 
gal., 24c; Crystal Spray, 23c; Silver 
Light, 21c; engine gasoline in barrels, 
gal., 27c; f.o.b. Winnipeg, in cases, $2.- 
75. 

PAINTS AND OILS — White lead, 
pure, $6.50 to $7.50, according to brand; 
bladder putty, in bbls., 2£c; in kegs, 
3Jc; turpentine, barrel lots, Winnipeg, 



90c; Calgary, 97c; Lethbridge, 97c; 
Edmonton, 98c Less than barrel lots, 
5c. per gallon advance. Linseed oil, 
raw, Winnipeg, 72c; Calgary, 79c; 
Lethbridge, 79c; Edmonton, 80c; boiled 
oil, 3c. per gallon advance on these 
prices. 



WIN 
single, 
inches, 
O.G., 
united 
to 50, 
$5.75. 
cases, 
to 50. 
$10.50; 
30. 



DOW GLASS — 16-oz. O. G., 

in 50-ft. boxes — 16 to 25 united 

$2.25 ; 26 to 40, $2.40 ; 16-oz. 

single, in 100-ft. cases— 16 to 25 

inches, $4 ; 26 to 40, $4.52 ; 41 

$4.75 ; 50 to 60, $5.25 ; 61 to 70, 

21-oz. C.S., double, in 100-ft. 

26 to 40 united inches, $7.35 ; 41 

$8.40; 51 to 60, $9.45 ; 61 to 70, 

71 to 80, $11 55 ; 81 to 90, $17.- 



INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT ROOF- 
ING. 

Nearly a quarter of a century has 
elapsed since the Standard Paint Com- 
pany began business, manufacturing the 
P. & B. products. These include P. & 
B. paint, electrical compounds, P. & B. 
insulating papers, and insulating tape. 

In addition to these, they at that 
time made a roofing, the base of which 
was burlap. This, however, in a very 
short time proved to be useless as a 
base — something more substantial had to 
be employed. Their experts were at once 
put to work to devise a roofing that 
would withstand every internal strain 
and all weather changes. 

About sixteen years ago, after much 
experimenting, they finally succeeded in 
making ruberoid roofing. From that 
time until this, without any change in 
its composition or construction, it has 
withstood the test of time. 

The Standard Paint Company have on 
file in their offices samples of ruberoid 
roofing which have been on buildings for 
the last fourteen years , and, although 
these have had no attention, they are as 
good to-day as when they were put on. 

Owing to the constantly increasing de- 
mand for ruberoid roofing, the Standard 
Paint Company, in addition to their fac- 
tories in the United States, and at Ham- 
burg, Germany, have had to build fac- 
tories in Canada. The factories in the 
Tinted States only supply South Am- 
erica, the West Indies, and the Orient; 
that in Hamburg the continental and 

45 



English colonial trade, and the Canadian 
factory at Montreal, was built to supply 
(lie large increasing demand for ruberoid 
roofing in Canada. 

Ruberoid has withstood the severest 
tests to which it is possible to Subject 
any roofing. Not only has it been used 
in the most northerly Arctic regions, but 
at the equator, with equal success. 
Changes in climate have absolutely no 
effect on it. Neither is it affected by 
oxidation, corrosion, acid fumes, or 
steam arising from the interior of build- 
ings in round tjpuses, factories, fertilis 
or plants, laundries, etc. Ruberoid is 
equally suitable for glass factories. 



FREIGHT QUESTION IN MONTREAL 



Street Railway Company Proposes a 
Plan to Relieve Congestion. 

A plan has been submitted by the 
Montreal Street Railway whereby the 
freight congestion which at present ex- 
ists in the city of Montreal may be re- 
lieved. Their proposition is nothing less 
than an offer to institute a service of 
freight cars which will enable them to 
transport merchandise from one section 
of the city to another. 

At the moment merchants in all 
branches of trade find it difficult to ob- 
tain prompt delivery of their goods 
within the city limits. It is next to im- 
possible to secure carters when they are 
wanted and it is probable in conse; 
quence that any action such as that 
proposed by the railway company would 
meet with the hearty approval of busi- 
ness men. 

It is proposed to run the freight oars 
at night in order that the passenger 
service accorded the public be not in- 
terfered with during daylight hours. 
Since the system owned bj 'lie com- 
pany practically covers the Island of 
Montreal it would be possible lor them 
to take freight for delivery to any of 
the suburbs, as well as within the city 
limits. 

If the plan they propose be adopted it 
is probable that many manufacturers and 
wholesalers would have sidings built to 
their shipping entrances. The whole 
matter is now under discussion in the 
council. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Heating and Housefurnishings 



SOME MODERN ENGLISH STOVES AND RANGES 

Prom 9 recent aiiiclc m the BuiMing NewB, London, Eng. 



There is an unquestionable tendency al 
tin- present day to reduce expenditure 
ami this i- being reflected in the build- 
ing industries by the production ol 
apparatus after another which will af- 
fecl a household economy by its adop- 
tion, either in the matter ot service and 
tabor or in the utilization of otherwise 



, 




FIG. 1 

waste products. It is possible in fire 
grates and cooking ranges to effect both 
these economies simultaneously, and to 
combine with them an economy in first 
cost also. The devices for doing this 
which are now upon the market are very 
many. 

So far as ordinary fireplaces are con- 
cerned, the first step in advance, from 
the English standpoint at least, was 
made when the Pridge-Tcale firebaok 
was introduced, now many years ago, 
and by the attention which was drawn 
to the subject in the various smoke pre- 
vention exhibitions which have been held 
since from time to time. The general 
idea has been "that of so constructing 
the fire as to cause perfect combustion 
of the fuel, thus utilizing for heating 
purposes both the waste gases and the 
solid smoke. The utilization of the heat 
Eor warming incoming air, although not 
often adopted on account of its expense, 
shortly afterward successfully 
achieved in what at the time was 
known as the GaltQn grate, and in 
many of the forms of hospital grates 
which are still in use in England. Then 




fig 2 

followed manv different contrivanci 
economizing fuel, most of them based 
upon the i solid hearth, 'irates 

const r icted on this principle, however, 
were found to choke with ashes and be 
dull. Thi ot often seen now, 

it ha\c developed into "well fires," 



"heaped Bxes," and many others which 
rest upon either a sunk or a raised 
I h ha\ bag an ash pan beneat h. 
In almost every case tie projecting 
back is used, ami sometimes projecting 
side6 also, these being so arranged that 
the tire is narrower :it back than front, 

50 as to I adiate t lie heat into t lie i 
If there is to be perfect combustion, 
however, it is necessary to fill up the 
rather sharp angle between tne bottom 
grating and the fireback with a block 
or pillow of some sort, preferably of 
lire cla\ , as done in the modern Vene- 
tian mate, as shown at A in Pig. 1. 
Lime lmiiiers know perfectly well that 
some such contrivance is necessary, and 
always introduce it into the flare kiln, 
as otherwise a dead corner results and 
the lime is imperfectly burnt. Some- 
times householders overcome the diffi- 
culty by introducing a movable piece of 
tire brick into this position, but not 
many of them understand the reason 
for doing so. 

If anthracite coal is to be burned, it 
1 etter to replace the block by a grat- 
ing of curved bars, so as to admit a 
supply of air into the midst of 
the fire. Throughout the greater part of 
England this hard coal is practically 
unknown, but there are other districts 
in which it is used to the exclusion of 
all other, while even in London there 
are some householders who prefer to use 
it in spite of its additional cost. There 
is no more sure way qf curing a smoky 
el i inney than that of burning a smoke- 
less coal. 

The introduction of a back block of 
the nature described has been adopted 
also in the (How portable cooriii^ 
ranges, combined with a roof block, 
which radiates the heat downward in 
such a way as to promote combustion 
of all the coal product s, the fuel being 
arranged on a hearth grating of entirely 
unusual shape, so as to economize the 
depth of coal while obtaining a large 
lire area, as shown in Pig. 2. There are 
other ranges, doubtless, which do the 
same sort of thing when needed by 
means of a hinged bottom, the object 
in all cases being the same — namely, to 
obtain the greatest amount of heat with 
the least expenditure of fuel, and to 
utilize it for cooking and boiling pur- 
poses to the utmost, so that it is com- 
paratively cool gas only which eventu- 
ally passes up the flue. It is naturally 
essential in all forms of range that 
every part should be accessible for 
cleaning. 

Another sitting room contrivance, 
which is likely to become popular on 
account of its economy, particularly in 
Hats and small houses where the sitting- 
rooms are. placed back to back, is that 
of a revolving fire pivoted in the centre 
of the wall, which can be used, say, for 
the dining room until dinner commence 
and the room is warm, then turned 
away from the back of the carver dur 
ing the dinner hour, so as to face 
toward the drawing room, which is then 
lnai id ready to lie. entered immediately 
There are certain difficul- 

46 



ties connected with this arrangement, 

but the\ are not insunnount able, and 

the advantages are considerable where 
great economy has to be exercised, 
while it is always possible to light a 
lire 011 each side of the revolving par- 
tition, ami so heat both rooms simul- 
taneously, if so desired. A movable ap- 
paratus such as this might, for ex- 
ample, be a great temptation to chil- 
dren, who would enjoy playing with it, 
seeing the fire appear and disappear, 
and calling out to one another in ex- 
citement as the changes took place. 
Whatever releasing and swinging ar- 
rangement is adopted it should, there 
fore, be such as to be under the control 
of adults only, else deplorable accidents 
might result. 

A somewhat noticeable feature in the 
recent Building Trades Exhibition in Lon- 
don was a series of exhibits by different 
firms of appliances for the secondary 
utilization of heat developed from an 
ordinary lire grate. This was generally 



SCULLERY 

"cISTEHN 




KITCHEN 



SCULLERY 




KITCHE- 



FIG. 3 



done by the introduction of boilers of 
various forms and conveyance there- 
from of water in small ball pipes to 
heat radiators or tow T el racks in other 
parts of the house. This is obviously a 
legitimate thing to do, for, although the 
boiler must be small, it was generally 
possible in this way to at least heat 
one radiator, say in a hall or much used 
bedroom, and a towel rack placed in a 
linen cupboard, thereby adding much to 
the comfort of a house. This can be 
done much more effectually from a kit- 
chen range, though it requires a really 
large boiler to supply a series of radi- 
ators in addition to the usual baths 
and sinks. There is this also to bear in 
mind that where the water is constant- 
ly changing on account of its being 
drawn off for household use then 1 
constant deposit of fur. This does not 
take place where the only waste of 
water occurs through exceedingly slow 
evaporation, for once all the lime in the 
water has been deposited this action 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



aecessafilj ceases until farther water is 
added. There are si. me boilers made 
from which the incrustation is easily 

removed, bu1 in ftianj of the comm < 

kinds it causes a great amount of 
trouble and even occasionally leads to 

burning out. 
Another combination arrangement is 

one now being much employed in arti- 
sans' dwellings, by means of which a 
■copper is heated from a small range 
fitted into a 2 It. 8 in. opening in a 
kitchen, it being generally Further con- 
trived to supply a hath also. As the 
range is in one room and the scullery 

in anotner, a rather special arrangement 
is necessary. The house has, in fact, to 
be built to fit the range, us the range 
cannot he introduced into any existing 
house. Fig - . ■> shows two ways in which 
this can be done when the Lanco com- 
bination is being used. 



TIN MINING IN CORNWALL. 

Consul Joseph Gr. Stephens, of Ply- 
mouth, writes as follows on renewed 
mining activity in that part of England: 

Cornish tin mining points to a re- 
vival. As long as the Americans delav 
developing the rich deposits in South 
Dakota and in the Southern States, so 
long will the Cornish mines profit 
through the lack of rivalry. There is 
no doubt that an enormous quantity of 
tin still remains to be extracted from 
the Cornish, hills. Many old mines, 
which ceased working when the bad 
times came some thirty years ago, were 
closed, not because they had not an 
abundant deposit of tin ore, but because 
the market was Hooded with foreign tin, 
which was then being produced at a 
price with which the deep and costly 
Cornish working could not compete. 
This foreign supply has now greatly 
diminished, and the world again turns 
for its supply to Cornwall. Old mines 
are being re-opened and new claims 
started 



IMPROVED HEATING STOVE. 

W. f-Ieuermann, Sedala, Mo., has in- 
vented an improved heating stove. There 
is provision in this stove for a relative- 
ly large heating surface, and a long flue 
or passage for transverse of the heated 
gaseous products of combustion. The 
stove proper, occupies a relatively small 
space. it comprises a combustion 
chamber and a superposed heating cham- 
ber connected and supported together 
. from the top of the downwardly extend- 
ed flues or pipes, the latter serving prac- 
tically in the place of legs or other 
usual form of support. 



TO MAKE STEEL RUST-PROOF. 

The invention attributed to a Birming- 
ham i Eng.) apothecary of a simple pro- 
cess for rendering steel rust-proof is one 
of revolutionary importance. The pro- 
cess would seem to consist of an appli- 
cation of phosphorus quite different from 
that which has produced the strong and 
beautiful, but seldom used, alloy, phos- 
phor-bronze. It is likely to be more 
akin to the process by which the ancients 
made copper hard and capable of taking 
an, edge like steel, a lost art thai every 
metallurgist has dreamed of rodiseover- 
i 1 1 u'. 



QUALITY HIGH 
PRICE RIGHT - 



ON ALL OUR 



66 



Metallic" 

Goods 

" EASTLAKE " SHINGLES 
MANITOBA SIDING 
ROCK-FACED SIDING (4 in 1) 
SKYLIGHTS 

" HALITUS " VENTILATORS 
FIREPROOF DOORS and WINDOWS 
GALVANIZED CORNICES 
SHEET METAL FRONTS 
CORRUGATED IRON 



It is a pleasure to give information and prices on any of these goods 
"OUR DEALERS ALWAYS PROTECTED" 



THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

Manufacturers Established 22 Years 

TORONTO AND WINNIPEG 




The John Morrow Screw, Limited 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONTARIO 



Shear making "up-to-date" is found in 

HEINISCH 

TAILORS' SHEARS, 
TRIMMERS, SCISSORS, 
TINNERS' SNIPS, ETC. 
"Best in the World" 

Since 1825, and a steady increase in sales 
due to their superior cutting quality. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 

NEWARK, N.J., U.S.A. 

New York Office and Salesroom, 155 Chambers St. 

47 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES AND BOOKLETS. 

When sending catalogues for review, 
manufacturers would confer a favor by 
pointing out the new articles that they 
contain. It would assist the editor in 
writing the raYlew. 

H\ mentioning HARDWARE AND 
MKTAL to show that the writer is in 
the trade, a copy of these catalogues or 
other printed matter will be sent by the 
firms whose addresses are given. 

Elaborate Stove Catalogue. 

The Gttrne] Foundry Co., Toronto, 
have just issued a magnificent 9 x 11 
inch catalogue containing 187 pages re- 
plete with illustrations, descriptive of 
their various styles of stoves, ranges, 
warm air furnaces, -team boilers, hot 
water beaters, radiators, general cast- 
ings, etc. In the centre of the front 
n i- a magnificent 5x5-inch colored 
engraving representing a typical foun- 
dry scene. Ten moulders are seen car- 
rying away the molten metal from two 
huge cauldrons into which it falls from 
glowing furnaces in the background. 
The dancing light of the red hot metal, 
which casts a lurid glare on windows, 
walls and floor and is reflected back on 
the animated faces and sinewy arms of 
the moulders, makes the picture ex- 
tremely realistic. The rest of the cover 
surrounding this scene is handsomely 
embossed in black, gold, green and pale 
green colors, the artistic effect obtained 
by this color combination leaving no- 
thing to be desired. The first two inner- 
pages of the catalogue contain fine en- 
gravings of the company's huge stove 
and furnace foundry, and boiler and 
radiator foundry, respectively. Immedi- 
ately after that the company's 
telegraphic code is explained and then 
follow a few pages of general directions 
for operating stoves, ranges, furnaces, 
etc. .Many pages are devoted to attract- 
ive designs and complete descriptions of 
steel ranges, the Oxford Chancellor 
steel plate range occupying the premier 
position, after which are shown various 
styles of Imperial Oxford ranges. Gas 
ranges, hot water boilers, radi- 
ators, hotel ranges and the 
various parts of each are all shown and 
described in an interesting manner. On 
the closing pages of the catalogue com- 
plete directions are given for ordering 
repairs, which makes it an easy matter 
for the customer to obtain the repair 
he wants without the usual confusion 
and delay. This handsome and compre- 
hensive catalogue, together with a sep- 
arate price list booklet, may be obtain- 

I by writing the company, mentioning 
this paper. 

Attractive I.C.R. Booklets. 

For the lover of history and romance, 
as well as for the tourist and sports- 
man, Eastern Canada possesses attrac- 
tions unsurpassed by any other portion 
of North America. To present a few of 
the attractions of this beautiful summer 
hmd, which, notwithstanding the thou- 
sands who travel over the road each 
year, is yet a veritable terra incognito 
to the average tourist and sportsman, 
the passenger department of the Inter- 
colonial Railway has prepared a beauti- 
ful and useful series of booklets. For 
general information this series is far in 
nee of anything of the kind ever 
presented to the puhfic by this railway 
before, and should be in the hands of 
everyone seeking rest and sport. 

The first of these publications is en- 
titlH "Tours to Summer Haunts." It 



is a pamphlet of some hundred pages, 
printed on coated book paper and 
eroush illustrated with artistic ball 
tone reproductions Of scenes incident to 
i he text, with sub-heads in marginal in- 
dent, .supplement mil; which is a schedule 
ni loins and excursions from Montreal 
to the principal points of interest, and 
facilities offered to notaries of rod and 

gun, all interesting and instructive 

reading for even those who have no op- 
portunity of visiting the pi. ices describ- 
ed. Then follow " Fishing and Hunt- 
ing," "The Hunting Grounds of the 
Micinacs," " A Week in the Canaan 
Woods," " Big (lame of the Southwest 
Mtramiehi," and " The Maritime Ex- 
press," all of which are eminently prac- 
tical subjects indicated by their respec- 
tive titles. 

" Fishing and Hunting," has the game 
laws of the different provinces compiled 
in addition to tabulated information 
concerning the varieties of game and 
fish to be found in each locality along 
the whole line. It is a splendid effort 
to present desired information in con- 
cise form, and meets the requirements 
admirably. 

" The Hunting Grounds of the Mic- 
inacs," presents to its readers a short 
historical reference to the tribe for 
which it is named, and directs the 
lovers of rod and gun where to find vic- 
tims. It is an admirable little hand- 
book, readable and full of information. 

" A Week in the Canaan Woods " and 
" Big Game of the Southwest Mirami- 
chi," informs the hunter and tourist of 
the attractions of the territories indi- 
cated by the names. 

" The Maritime Express " is really an 
annotated time table describing the lo- 
cality of each station, and giving valu- 
able information regarding business, 
sport and other data necessary or de- 
sired by travelers from Montreal to the 
eastern termini of the road. 

The booklets are legibly printed, well 
illustrated with half-tones, and each has 
a full four-page map of the country tra- 
versed by the railroad. Sportsmen and 
tourists may obtain these interesting 
publications by applying to the company 
mentioning this notice. 



who have not received this . catalogue 
will do well to procure one by applying 

to the company, mentioning this paper 
months are as follows: 



New Sporting Catalogue. 

A very artistic sporting goods cata- 
logue is now being issued to the trade 
by Lewis Bros., Montreal, one >of Cana- 
da's greatest wholesale hardware houses. 
The covers are of light green stiff paper, 
tbe outside front cover containing an il- 
lustration of the Montreal home of the 
firm, and an elaborate contents list. 
On the inside of the front cover is a 
message to customers regarding com- 
plaints about high charges for gun re- 
pairs, and also advice as to shipping of 
guns to the firm for repairs. 

The catalogue consists of 100 pages 
fully illustrated, containing cuts and 
prices on all lines of shot guns, rifles 
and ammunition. 

The lines of rifles carried by Lewis 
Bros., are : the Winchester, the Marlin, 
the Savage, and Stevens'. Illustrations 
and juices are given also of hunters' 
supplies, such as traps, sheath knives, 
hunting knives, pocket compasses, 
axes, police goods, skates, hockey 
sticks, and fishers' supplies are 
included. Altogether, the catalogue 
contains interesting information, and 
is attractively gotten up, and is 
eminently a credit to its compilers. Any 

4 8 



Convenient Cartridge Chart. 
C. Ddgar Wood, general sales mana- 
ger for the Dominion Cartridge Co., 
Montreal, who lias for years sold am- 
munition to the retail trade — having 
been associated With one of the large 
jobbing houses — from practical experi- 
ence, became decidedly impressed with 
the fact that the trade needed an educa- 
tional hanger or chart that would show 
the exact difference between each cart- 
ridge. Heretofore the cartridges have 
been mounted on boa 1 ' that by rea- 
son of their size had to be placed high 
on the walls, where minute inspection 
as to size and shape was impracticable. 
To do away with this dimcultv. Mr. 
Wood has gotten up a new chart or 
hanger with the different sizes and 
types grouped for immediate inspec- 
tion, and the new hanger will no doubt 
prove of decided benefit to all hardware 
and sporting goods dealers. The Dom- 
inion Cartridge Company will take plea- 
sure in forwarding one of these conveni- 
ent hangers to any dealer applying for 
it on his business stationery. 

Asbestology. 

" Asliestology " for July, published 
by Canadian Asbestos Co., Montreal, 
contains some interesting information 
regarding the various asbestic products, 
with a few lines more or less pungent. 
This little paper is done on red paper 
and will be interesting and instructive 
to all engaged in asbestos business. 



Compo-Rubber Roofing. 

Merrick Anderson Co., Winnipeg, have 
recently been appointed agents in West- 
ern Canada for the sale of compo-rubber 
roofing. A superior line manufactured by 
the Lineolu Waterproof Cloth Co., 
Bound Brook, N.J. This is a superior- 
line of roofing specially prepared to 
withstand the effects of heat, rain, 
snow and cold. Western Canada affords 
an immense market for roofing materi- 
als of superior quality and Merrick 
Anderson Co. state that their new line 
is meeting with a favorable reception 
from the trade. 

Wants Catalogues. 
F. R. Agnew, Box 1181, Calgary, Al- 
ta., writes this office that he would like 
to receive catalogues from manufactur- 
ers of hardware and plumbing supplies. 



New Stove Catalogues. 
The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Mon- 
treal, have issued to the trade two 
splendidly gotten up catalogues, contain- 
ing illustrations and price lists of their 
full line of stoves and ranges. The 
larger of the two catalogues is bound 
in heavy brown linen with an illustra- 
tion of their factories. Inside is a page 
of instructions on how to put up stoves. 
This catalogue throughout is replete 
with illustrations and information. The 
smaller booklet is enclosed in yellow 
cover and contains full illustrations of 
their special line of ranges. All inter- 
ested 5n the stove trade will do well to 
procure a copy of these by applying to 
the company mentioning this paper. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON ONT. 



ALL 

INGOT 

METALS 
IN STOCK 



A.C. LESLIE & CO. 

Limited 
flONTREAL 



I. 



MIDLAND' 



BRAND. 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with ConneUiville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land ' ' will rival in quality and grading the 
very beat of the imported brands. 













Drummond, MoCall 


A 


Co. 






MONTREAL, QUE 


er te 










Canada 


Iron 


Furnace 


Co. 


MIDLAND 


ONT. 




Limited 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u.k.< 

NEW 9LAS0OW. M.S. 



Maaufacturem of- 






Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIBMENS-MAKTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 




"HAMMER THE HAMMER' 

That phrase has hammered into universal popularity the 

Iver Johnson *£&. 



Revolver 



which is a Dealer's Proposition, straight and 
simple. 

Never permitted as a premium. Never sold 
by mail where dealers can supply. One the 
dealer can safely recommend, and we will stand 
behind him. 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS AND CYCLE WORKS, 

330 River St., Fitchburg. Mass. 

Makers of Iver Johnson Truss Bridge Bicycles .md Simile Barrel Shotguns i 



Send 
for 
Iver 

Johnson 
Catalogues 
lor 

Dealers, 
ir ask 
'our jobber 
he knows 



'♦•do.* 



SHOT 



The season for the sale of this line is at 
hand, and in ordering your supply of Shot it 
is well to consider the question of quality. 

"M.R.M." Shot is made from the very 
best quality of pig lead. Care is taken in its 
manufacture to have it 

Uniform, Round and True to Size 

It has earned for itself the reputation of 
always being up to standard, and can be relied 
upon to give satisfaction. 




fr;S.* 



MADE BY 



The Montreal Rolling Mills Co. 




*'•«•« 




►•i?< 



49 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 

For additional items see the correspondeiue papres. The Editor 
solicits information from any authoritative source regarding build- 
ing and Industrial news of an- sort, the formation or incorporation 
of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories or 
foundries, railway or mining news. 



Companies Incorporated. 

The Spanish River Navigation Po., 

Massey, Onl . capital, UQ I ; to build 

ships and vessels. Provisional directors: 
.1 Errington, .). Sheets, J. S. Lowe, 
all of Massey, Ont. 

The Watford Milling Co., Watford, 
Onl.. capital, (40,000 . to carry on a 
general milling business. Provisional 
directors : A. Dunlop, G. A. Dunlop and 
S RJv< rs, all of Watford. 

Ham & Cuhitt, Toronto, capital, $40,- 
OOO , to manufacture paper boxes, en- 
velopes and printers' machinery. Provi- 
sional directors : D. Bain, W. C. Cubit t, 
i s Deuison, all of Toronto. 

The Cobbler-Sexton Co., Woodstock, 
Out., capital, 11,024,000; to carry on 
minin? and milling and reduction. Pro- 
visional directors : Wm. A. Hayward, 
J. C. Hovey, E. L. Greer, J. McCle- 
ment, I. Draper, all of Woodstock. 

The Interlocking Piling and Engineer- 
ing Co., Limited, Toronto, capital. 
$200,000 ; to manufacture and deal in 
interlocking, piling and piling of all 
kinds, and carry on the business of en- 
gineers. Provisional directors : II. E. 
Pearce, A. Gate, W. II. Smith, G. Ker- 
win, M. Irving, all of Toronto. 

Industrial Development. 

There is a great influx of machinery 
to the Cobalt regions. 

Fire did damage to the extent of $50,- 
000 in Winchester, Ont. 

The Doty Engine Co., Goderich, Out., 
erecting a new foundry. 

W. C. Edwards' sash and door factory 
Ottawa, was destroyed by fire. 

The Hull Electric Co., Hull, Que., are 
erecting an addition to their plant. 

The Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamil- 
ton, will erect a factory to cost $75,000. 

A large cement mill will be erected at 
Owen Sound by some Toronto capitalists. 

The Ontario Iron and Steel Co., Wet- 
land, will begin smelting operations soon. 

The Canadian Cutlery Co., want a loan 
of $25,000 to erect a plant at Grimsby. 
Ont. 

The Chestnut Canoe Co., Frederic-ton. 
N.B., arc erecting a factory to cost $13,- 
000. 

Fire damaged t he Flemming's foun- 
dry. St. John, X.B., to the extent of $1,- 

ooo. 

The Mortimer Co., Ottawa, are erect- 
ing an addition to their premises, to cost 
$25,000. 

The Western Bag Co., Winnipeg, will 
erecf a warehouse to cos! +'200,000 in 
that city. 

The flour mill and electric plant of 
Claresholm, Alta.. was destroyed by fire 
recently. 

The pork-packiii'_ r factory at Aylmer. 
Ont., was destroyed by fire caused by 
lightning. 

The Rocky Mountain Cement Co. will 



establish a large cement works at Blair- 
more, Aha. 

The sash and door factor} of Henry 
llenks. Toronto, was destroyed by fire: 
loss $6,000. 

The Dominion Car and Foundry Co.. 
Montreal, will enlarge their works at a 
cost of siMiOO. 

The Cobalt Concentrators, Ltd., are 
asking for tenders lor a concentrating 
mill at Cobalt. 

The buildings of the Manitoba Peat 
Works, Fort Francis, Man., will be re- 
buili immediately. 

The Dominion Paint Co. J s premises at 
Hamilton were damaged by fire to the 
extent of $1,200. 

The storage tank of the Imperial Oil 
Co., at Sarnia, Out., was destroyed by 
lightning recently. 

Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co., St. Cath- 
arines, Ont., will spend $50,000 in an ad- 
dition to their factory. 

The factory of the Dominion Furni- 
ture Co., St. Therese, Que., was desti-oy- 
ed by fire; loss $100,000. 

A firm manufacturing stoves for burn- 
ing soft coal wants a free site and loan 
of $10,000 from Sarnia, Ont. 

The Kensington Furniture Co., God- 
erich, Ont., are making extensive addi- 
tions to their furniture factory. 

A brick company has been formed by 
some residents of Lacombe, Alta., and a 
large industry will be established. 

Mackay Bros., North Bay, with a capi- 
tal of $100,000, will acquire the hard- 
ware business of David Purvis. 

The pulp and wood mills of the North 
River Lumber Co., Murray, N.S., were 
totally destroyed by fire recently. 

The firm of J. M. Ross, Sons & Co., 
St. Catharines, which received a bonus 
of $20,000 from that city, has failed. 

Work has commenced on the factory 
of the Aluminium and Crown Stopper 
Co., Toronto. The factory will cost $50,- 
000. 

The cement brick works at Radisson. 
Sask., have started operations and the 
product has been found satisfactory in 
every way. 

The machinery is being installed in the 
new buildings of the St. Thomas Can- 
ning Co., St. Thomas, and will be run- 
ning in three weeks. 

The Ottawa Steel Casting Co., Ot- 
tawa will increase the capacity of their 
furnace to 8 tons per day. A new addi- 
tion will be erected and a new plant in- 
stalled. 

The Chapman Double Ball Bearing 
Co.. Toronto, have been awarded the con- 
tract for the entire equipment of the 
new plant of the Standard Valve and 
Pitting Co., Guelph. 

The Don Valley Brick Works, Toron- 
to, have received the contracl for the 



fireproof brick for the new Royal Bank 
branch in that city. 

The International Heating and Light- 
ing Co. have obtained a franchise from 
Port Saskatchewan, and will erect a 
plant there. Machinery has been order 
ed to cost $10(1,000. 

A unique elect lie power plant, indeed 
the first of its kind in America, was 
opened recently at Ohignecto mines, N. 
S.. The power house is situated at the 
mouth of the mine ami the waste screen- 
ings are used for fuel. This does away 
with transportation id' fuel and at (he 
same time uses fuel that would other- 
wise he useless. It is said the power can 
be obtained at such a low rate that it 
will be available for every sphere of 
manufacturing, The power is transmit- 
ted to Amherst, N.S., a distance of 7 
miles. This style of plant has long been 
advocated by authorities who have made 
the production of cheap power a study. 
It is hoped that this will he the means of 
bringing new industries to Amherst. 

Building Notes. 

A town hall will be erected at Ros- 
thern, S-ask. 

A new high school will be erected at 
Beachville, Ont. 

The new high school at Calgary, Alta. 
will cost $(>8",000. 

A hotel will be erected at Kenora, 
Ont. to cost $225,000. 

The high school Ottawa, will be en- 
larged and re-modelled. 

J. Murphy will erect a business block 
in Fort William to cost $15,000. 

A. E. Snell, Calgary, Alta., is en- 
larging his dry goods establishment. 

E. R. Wayland, Fort William, Ont., 
will erect a residence to cost $11,000. 

A morgue and ambulance house will 
be erected in Toronto to cost $30,000. 

A police station will be erected in To- 
ronto on Queen street to cost $25,000. 

A building will be erected by the 
Y.M.C.A. in St. .John, N.B, to cost 
$fi0 ? 000. 

A new wing is being erected at the 
Hotel Dieu Hospital, Catnphellton, N.B. 
to cost $40,000.' 

The grand stand at the Ottawa ex- 
hibition grounds was destroyed by fire, 
entailing a loss of $00,000. 

The Edmonton Steam Laundry Co., 
Edmonton, Alta., are erecting an addi- 
tion to their plant to cost %?. 000. 

A large fire in North Bay recently did 
damage' to the extent of $25,000 to til ■ 
hardware stock of J. W. Richardson. 

The contract for the new Bank of 
Commerce building, Brantfoi'd, has been 
let to Schultz Bros. It will cost $30,- 
000. 

Mining News. 

The Silver Queen mine, Cobalt, Ont.. 
will erect a smelter. 

A valuable depoist of silver and lead 
has been discovered near Loon Lake. 
N.S. 

The Montreal Copper Co., Montreal. 
have recently received large orders from 
foreign countries. 

A mining company is being formed at 
Sturgeon Pake, Out., for the purpose of 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
.ADVE^TISEHENTS. 

Advertisements under this heading 2c. a word first 
nsertion ; 1c. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but live figures (as 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. ' 

Cash remittances to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no oase can this rule be overlooked. 
Advertisements received without remittance cannot be 
acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



AGENT WANTED. 



A GEN I warned t u p.. sh an advertised line of Welsh 
tinplates; write at first to " B.R ." care HARD- 
WARE AND METAL, 88 Fleet St., E.C., 
London, Eng. [tf] 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 



MINING hardware, gloves and tinware business for 
sale; sales $4,000 monthly; buildings and lot, 
$3,500; present stock, $8,000; proprietor's 
health failing; a bonanza. Box 643, HARDWARE 
AND METAL, Toronto. [32] 

FOR SALE — Well established hardware, tinshop, 
implement and undertaking business, also good 
lumber yard, well fenced, with lumber and lime 
sheds in good condition ; we will sell above altogether, 
or divide same to suit purchaser; proprietors are 
rehiring from business in Manitoba, and therefore wish 
for immediate sale. Apply to Eakins & Griffin, Shoal 
L«ke, Man. [33] 

WANTED— Partner to take half interest in one of 
the best hardware propositions in Algoma ; 
plumber preferred. Box 636, HARDWARE 
AND METAL, Toronto. [32] 

HARDWARE, tinware, stove and plumbing business 
in manufacturing town in the Niagara Peninsnla ; 
no competition ; $250,000 factory and water- 
marks will be completed this summer; stock about 
$3,000; death of owner reason for selling. Box 85, 
Thorold, Ont. [tf] 

FOR SALE— A good hardware business in Western 
Ontario; stock about $6,000. For further refer- 
ence apply The Hobbs Hardware Co., Limited, 
London, Ont. [32] 

HARDWARE and Tin Business for Sale in good 
Western Ontario town of 3,000: stock about 
$3,500; good reasons for selling. Address, Box 647 
HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. (34) 










Brighten Up 

Our "Brighten Up" Campaign last year 
was a winner. This year we have another 
— even better than the last. It begins 
September ist. The features have been 
specially planned for it — they're strong — 
they're distinctive — they'll get the busi- 
ness. This campaign is going to pre ce 
results. 

If you are not one of those fortunate dealers 
who handle S-W. Products, let us hear 
from you. Take advantage of the business 
opportunities our big "Brighten Up" Cam- 
paign will bring. We have othercampaigns, 
too, and are constantly helping our agents. 
We co-operate to mutual advantage. 
Get our proposition today. Address 

The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

LARGEST PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS IN THE WORLD 

Canadian Headquarters and Plant: 639 Centre St. Montreal, Que. 
Warehouses: 86 York St., Toronto, and Winnipeg, Man. 










_- 



HARDWARE, Tinware, Stove and Furnace Business 
for sale, in live Eastern Ontario Village; first 
class chance for a practical man; English speaking 
community; stock can be reduced to suit purchaser; 
can g'we possession September 15th. 1907; premises 
for Sale or Rent, Apply to D. Courville, Manxville, 
Ont. (34) 

HARDWARE Business and Tinshop for sale in 
Saskatchewan; population 1500; stock carried 
about $14,000 turnover, $45,000 practically all cash 
business; cash required, $8,000 would rent building; 
Do not answer without you have the money and mean 
business; it will pay to investigate this. Box 648 
Hardware & Metal, Toronto. (41) 



FOR SALE. 



FOR SALE — First-class set of tinsmith's tools 
second-hand but almost as good as new ; includes 
an 8-foot iron brick almost new. Apply Pease 
Waldon Co., Winnipeg. [if] 



pOR SALE— A quantity of galvanized plain twist wire. 
Apply to C B. Miner, Cobden, Ont. (34) 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



TINSMITHS WANTED - First-class tinsmiths 
wanted for points west of Winnipeg; must be 
good mechanics capable of taking charge of a 
metal department; thorough knowledge of furnace 
work necessary. Pease Waldon Co., Winnipeg, Man. 

un_ 

WANTED- Hardware clerk, experienced, who can 
keep stock, and is willing to do so ; sober and 
active ; state age, experience and salary expected 
at start. Hose & Canniff, Kenora, Ont. [32] 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 



SITUATION wanted as master mechanic or chief 
engineer by man of 22 years' experience as a 
mechanic; can give Al reference as to ability; 
strictly temperate. Box A, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto. [32] 

GERMAN (31), 14 years' commercial experience 
desires situation; perfect knowledge of tools, 
hardware, fittings of every description, wooden 
goods, bar iron, steel, metals, also bookkeeping short- 
hand (English and German) typewriting, storekeeping ; 
at liberty on about October 1st. Address 0783 care of 
Messrs. Deacon's, Leadenhall Street, London, E.C 

COMMERCIAL gentleman with nine years' trade 
connection with ironmongers, architects and pub- 
lic institutions in Great Britain desires position as 
representative of a Canadian manufacturing firm. 
Box X, HARDWARE AND METAL, Montreal. 

HARDWARE Salesman or Clerk, seven years' ex- 
perience, desires situation. Abstainer, best of 
references; position in the West preferred. A. Tilley, 
Brantford, Ont. (31) 

\I7ANTED (by Englishman) position in Hardware 
VV store, experience in all branches, bookkeeper, 
would invest $400 to $500, Address, Box 646 
HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. (31) 



WANTED. 







FFICE space wanted by manufacturer In Toronto; 
state location and terms. Box 645, HARDWARE 
AND METAL, Toronto. [32] 



THE WANT AD. 

The want ad. has grown from a 
little used force in business life, 
into one of the great necessities 
of the present day. 

Business men nowadays turn to 
the " want ad " as a matter of 
course for a hundred small id- 
vices. 

The want ad. gets work foL 
workers and workers for work. 

It gets clerks for employers and 
finds employers for clerks. It 
brings together buyer and seller, 
and enables them to do business, 
though they may be thousands of 
miles apart. 

The " want ad." is the great, 
force in the small affairs and inci- 
dents of daily life. 



51 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



operating the Wyndego, near rlenora, 

Out. 

A topper smelter with a capacity of 
250 tons of ore per day will be er< 
ai the Whitehorse mine, Yukon, by the 
Yukon Smelting and Power Co. 

Railroad Construction. 

Tin. 1 permit has been issued foj the 
new C.N.R. shops at Winnipeg, to cosl 
$200,000. 

The Canadian Northern have been 
asked to build a line from Cobalt to 
Rarrj Sound, Out. 

The G.T.R. will erect a large round- 
..i i>'!' and, .Mich., to have accom 
inodation for forty engines. 

Municipal Undertakings. 

\ court house will he erected at Sas- 
katoon, Sask. 

A provincial jait£"wfli he erected .1 
Moosemin, Sask., to'Vost 550,000 

The ratepayers of Whitewater, Man , 
have decided to construct a telephone 
system. 

A site has been obtained in Moreen, 
.Man. for the new municipal electric 
light plant. 

The ratepayers of Amherstburg, Ont., 
will spend (2,560 in improving the 
waterworks svstem. 



HAMMER FIRST KNOWN TOOL. 
The hammer, besides being a tool of 
universal use. is probably the oldest re- 
itative of a mechanic's tool kit. 
The hammer was originally a stone 
fastened to a handle with thong's and 
itw as useful as a weapon as a tool. 
Hammers are represented on the monu- 
ments of Egypt 20 centuries before our 
era. They greatly resemble the ham- 
mer now in use. save that (here were 
no (daws on the back for the extraction 
of nails. Claw hammers were invented 
some time during the middle ages. Il- 
luminated manuscripts of the eleventh 
century represent carpenters with claw 
hammers. Hammers are of all sixes. 
from the dainty instruments used by all 
tin- jewelers, which weigh less than 
half an ounce, to the gigantic .KMon 

hammer of shipbuilding establishments, 

some of which have a falling force of 
Hi» to ion tons. Every trade has its own 
hammer and it ^ own way of using it. 



CANADA'S OLDEST IRON FURNACE 

The St. Maurice Forges, on the Eight 
hank of the St. Maurice river, about 
seven miles above Three Rivers, are the 
(ddest smelting furnaces in Canada, and 
dispute with those of I'rineipio, in 
Maryland, the right to he considered 
the oldest in America. The deposits of 
bog-ore were known very early to the 
Jesuits. In 1668 they were examined by 
the Sieux la I'otardien, who repoitcd 
unfavorably to the Intendaiit Talon as 
to their quality and quantity. Fron- 
tenac and De Denonville gave a better 
account of them, and it seems 
tests were made before the year 1700. 
Jl was not until 1 7 :-> 7 . however, 1 hu I a 
company was found to work them. This 
company was granted a large tract, in- 
cludiim the site whi 



now stand, ami erected furnaces, hut ex 
hausted its capital, and in 1710 had to 
surrender its charter. The Government 
carried on the works very successfully, 
as a report of the Colonial Inspector 
Tranguet shows, and must have ex- 
tended them, as appears l«> the erection 

of the edd chateau that stands on a il.il 
liluti overlooking the river. On an iron 
plate in its chimney are the official 
Hears de lis and the date 1752 Its 

walls, some two and a half feet thick, 
withstood the (ire that destroyed its 
dwork in L86 
\ brook Hows through the ravine im- 
mediately below the chateau. It furn- 
ished water power lor the oldest works, 
remains of which are to he seen near 
its mouth. The attachments of an old 
shaft show that a trip hammer 
used, and there are other signs of ex- 
tve works for making wrought iron. 
From 25(1 to 300 men were employed, 
under directors who had gained their 
skill in Sweden. .Many of the articles 
made then— notably stoves— still attest 
the quality of the iron and of the Work, 
Pigs and bars were sent to France. 
During the war shot and shells were 
1.1st. When the English came to take 
possession, the chateau was occupied by 



A 










Canada's Oldest Iron Furnace. 



a Desmoiselle Poulin, who threw the 
keys into the river rather than yield 
them. Legends of mysterious lights and 
buried treasure cling to the place. After 
the conquest the works were leased to 
private persons, and have passed through 
several hands before coming into those 
of the present owners, who use most of 
the product in the manufacture of car- 
wheels in Three Rivers. 

The original blast-furnace, or cupola— 
a huge block of granite masonry, thirty 
feet sqtuare at, (he bas< — is still used for 
smelting ; the fire has rarely been ex- 
tinguished, except for repairs, during 
the past 15*1 years. 



RAZOR BLADE HOLDER. 

T. F. Curley, Mew York, N.Y.,has in- 
vented an improved holder for ra/.or 
blades. The object in this improvement 
is to provide a holder for ra/.or blades 
used in ordinary and safety razors, and 
to he held in stropping and honing 
machines and oilier devices. The blade 
holder can he arranged so as to hold a 
blade securely in position during the 
use of the ra/or, machine, or oilier de 
vice, and will allow an interchange ol 

blades of different thicknesses. 



Consolidated 

Plate 

Glass 

Company 

of Canada 

Limited 



Glazing 
G/ass 



of all kinds 



LOWEST PRICES 
ASK FOR THEM 



Write Near«tt Office 



TORONTO 

MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 



Hardivarc and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



BEST ELBOWS 

FOR 

CONDUCTOR 
PURPOSES 

BEAR 
TRADE MARK 




PLAIN ROUND. 

CORRUGATED. 




For Sale by the TRADE 

in Canada. Write for 

catalogue and 

samples to 



Jobbers and 



Ferdinand Dieckhann 

1180-82-84 HARRISON AYE. 

CINCINNATI, 0., U.S.A. 




Pertinent 



Pease 



Points 



*v 



•'V- 






From January ist to August ist, 1907, many 
more Pease Heaters have been shipped than during 
the same months of any previous year. 



*^/» 



^V. 




mt^m* 



*t^/ t* n R f **mm> ifc — rftyw/^ 



On August ist, 1907, The Pease Company had 
vastly more orders entered for Fall delivery than 
on the same date in any previous year. 






J%/* 



t/^t« 






*S%f 



^v 



~m/VQ 



* 



At the beginning of August, 1907, The Pease 
Company are better equipped than ever before 
to fill orders promptly; to satisfy every require- 
ment of the Heating Trade and to maintain their 
pre-eminent position in the Heating business in 
Canada. 



|^iigft»i» ii i/\y n ■— /tyW»^^f 



m^ft m mm^fm* 



? 



We have a new illustrated price list. 
Would you like to have one? 



Pease-Waldon Co., Ltd. 

Winnipeg 



Pease Foundry Co., Ltd. 

Toronto 



53 



PAINT, OIL \M» l'.RUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



News of the Paint Trade 



PAINTING THE EIFFEL TOWER. 

Tin- Eiffel Tower Company has jusl 
had iis concession renewed until the year, 
1914, and is celebrating the evenl by 
giving tin- tower B new coat of paint, 
thirty tons of liquid paint being requir- 
ed to give it a single coat. Fifty paint- 
working continuously together, take 
three months t<> do one coat. In L889 
three of them fell. The tower had al- 
ready had eighteen victims in construct- 
ing, and everyone working about it went 
carefully. In the repainting of L895 
seven men fell, burying their bodies deep 
in the earth. When, after live men had 
been killed, the directors would have 
rigged them up with life-saving belts 
and ropes, says the Oil and Color Trade 
Journal^ they rebelled to a man. The 
result was that (wo others fell b 
the job was finished. In 1900 the direc- 
tors called for painters who had worked 
in IS!)."), to give them preference. They 
responded in a mass and asked exorbit- 
ant wages. When it was finally got in- 
to their heads thai the selection was be- 
iug made not for their skill as painters, 
but as a mere act of humanity, they 
agreed to work for the usual advance of 
:in per cent, on the union scale — on con- 
dition of not being required to disgrace 
themselves with life-saving belts and 

rigging. The result was five men killed 
in 1900. Now, last week there fell the 
firs! victim of the sciies of 1907. The 
actual painting has not been begun. He 
was a foreman, and he was just climbing 
about, Looking over the job. He fell 
from a point a trifle below the third plat- 
form, struck three times going down, de- 
flecting his fall, and yet his body sank 
almost five feet into the earth of a flow- 
er-bed beside the southeast pile. The 
third platform is 940 feet from the 
ground. Every artist in Paris is con- 
cerned about the color, on which depends 
whether the gigantic mass of iron shall 

'be the eve-sore or the glory of the capi- 
tal. Its' first -hade, in 1889, was '-dead 
leaf." and the sun lit it up to hazy 
gold. In 1895, after immense discussion. 

f they repainted it orange. In strong sun 
the orange showed gleaming copper. 

Then, for the exposition of 1 900, they 
painted it "sun-color.'' In brighl lights 
the tower became a thing of glory once 
again. That was seven years ago. The 
atmospheric electricity received every 
hour by such an unprecedented mass of 
iron reaching up in the air is incalculable. 
Conducting-tubes a foot and a half in 
diameter lead down its four piles to 50 
feel below the Water-bearing stratum of 
the earth; but the effect on the paint is 
there for everyone to see. It does not 
crack oil: it simply disappears, leaving 
the ugly, dingy brown of the oxydising 
iron. 



a recipe for tin varnish is given as 
follows : Asphalt 10 parts by w 
rosin ~> parts, linseed oil varnish 20 
parts, oil of turpentine H parts. 



Wouldn't it be Worth 

a good (leal to you to know wlini a customer comes 
into your store and asks for a varnish for a certain 
purpose, while you cannot advise from your own 
knowledge of varnishes and their uses, you may feel 
perfectly safe in recommending ELASTILITE ? 

ELASTILITE VARNISH is for all outside or J 
inside uses. Good Body, Brilliant Lustre and very J 
Durable. t 

In cans only, \ pts. to 1 gallon, with our brass { 

\ 

t 



seal. 



See Catalogue No. 10, page 3 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



The Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



} TORONTO, CANADA. 

* Stocks at 

WINNIPEG, MAN., c/o MASON &. HICKEY. 
VANCOUVER, B.C., c/o DURAND MERCHANDISE CO. 



LIMITED 



I 

BRONZE POWDER and BRONZE LIQUIDS 

ARE GUARANTEED WHEN MADE BY 

The Canadian Bronze Powder Works 

Backed by long experience, R. E. Thorne & Co. have unsurpassed facilities for 
filling orders at short notice. Write for particulars. 



MONTREAL 

NO ORDER TOO LARGE, 



— TOROIMTO 

EXTENSIVE WORKS AT VALLEYFIELD, QUE 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 




To be obtained from the principal Dealers in Glass, Hardware, and Painters' Supplies. 

Contractors to H. M. Government and the principal English Sheet and Plate Glass 

Works 



GlLBERTSOJVs, 



COMET 



Gilbertson's Sheets 

and the COMET Brand 

mean quality and security in whatever work 
you may undertake. 

Galvanized flat sheets that are unequalled as 
to flatness ; absolute trueness to gauge ; admir- 
ably suited in softness for any working. Note 
the brand "COMET." GILBERTSON on 
every sheet means security. 
W. GILBERTSON & CO., Limited, Pontardiwi, South Walts 

ALEX. GIBB, 13 St. John St., Montreal, Agent 






54 



Hardware and Metal 



PATNT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



YOUR CUSTOMERS LIKE 

a paint that keeps up its good appearance. They won't come back to your store if you sell them a paint which fades 
quickly. Your safest plan is always to recommend 

NEW ERA PAINT 

You'll be sure then of permanent customers who will reflect their pleasure by increased orders. 

STANDARD PAINT AND VARNISH WORKS CO., LIMITED 

WINDSOR ONTARIO 



JAMIESON'S 

LIQUID 

HARD 

FLOOR 

WAX 

The Modern Finish 
for Waxed Floors 



Easiest to apply and 
keeps its appearance 
for a longer period than 
any other floor wax. 

Put up in Pints, Quarts, 
Half Gallons and Gallons. 

Manufactured by 

R. C. JAM1ES0N & CO. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 



HEADQUARTERS 



FOR 



Window Glass, 
Paints, Oils, 

Fine Varnishes 

SANDERSON PEARCY & CO., Ltd. 

Toronto, Canada 




STOVE PIPE 




SCHEIP'S 
PATENT NESTED 

25 lengths in crate 

We also 

manufacture 

a full line 

of Cooper's 

Elbows. 

The Best 

on 

the Market. 



This is the only perfect working Knock Down Pipe made, will not telescope. 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., HAMILTON, ONT. 




GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS OF PROVED WORTH, 

Having ft Century's Reputation for Reliability. 
MADE BY 

A. SHAW & SON, London, Ens- 

CANADIAN AGENT 

GODFREY S. PELTON, 201 Coristine Building, Montreal 

55 



P UNT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware mnl hfetdl 



Paint and Oil Markets 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 9.- On account of lasi 
Monday being Toronto's civic holiday, 
time for business this week has been 
shortened by one day, and consequently 
tlio large supply houses here have been 
kepi busy during the last eoUple of days 
attending to the orders which accumulat- 
ed over the holiday. In all departments 
of the paint and oil markets the amount 
of business being done is satisfactory in 
every respect for the beginning of Au- 
gust, with prices throughout remaining 
the same as quoted last week. 

White Lead A steady trade is being 

caiiied on tor August. Prices are firm 

and unchanged at the following figures: 

Genuine pure white lead is quoted at 

5, and Xo. 1 is held at $7.25. 

Red Lead — The market continues quiet 
though a fair amount of sorting orders 
continue to arrive. There are no 
changes in quotations, which run as fol- 
Qenuine, in casks of 500 lbs., $6,- 
:'. , ditto, in ke^s of 100 lbs., $6.75; No. 
1. in casks of 500 lbs., $5; ditto, in 
of 100 lbs., $5.50. 

Paris Green — The demand has fallen 
off to a considerable degree during the 
week and it may be safely said that as 
far as the local market is concerned the 
season is practically over. Of course, 
the cool weather which prevailed during 
the latter part of last week is partly re- 
sponsible for the decreased demand and 
no doubt the present hot spell will have 
the effect of restoring trade in repeat 
orders for a few days more at least. The 
following prices are still quoted; Cana- 
dian Paris green, 29ic. base; English 
Paris green, 30Jc. 

Petroleum — Little variation is notice- 
able in the demand and locally prices 
show no disposition to change from these 
figures: Prime white, 13c; water white. 
; Pratt's astral, 18c. 

Shellac — For this time of the year the 
demand is good, with prices unchanged 
as under: Pure orange, in barrels, $2.- 
70; white. .*2.82J per' barrel; No. 1. 
(orange), $2.50. 

Turpentine — The local prices for 
spirits of turpentine are unchanged. The 
market in the southern States has ad- 
vanced slightly within the past week and 
while there is a good supply of turpen- 
tine apparently on hand, it looks as if 
there will be a steady advance now in 
the market tor the next two months. 
Local prices remain at the following 
figures: Single barrels, 80c; two bar- 
rels and upwards, 79c. f.O.b. point of 
shipment, net 30 days: less than barrels. 
5c. advance. Terms: 2 per cent., 30 
days. 

i.inseecl Oil — The linseed oil market 
is unchanged, futures depending 
very largely upon the flax crop 
in the western provinces. At 

ut reports are not very favorable. 
English oil may be slightly cheaper for 
futures, as the seed supply from the 
Bast Indies is said to be somewhat larg- 
er than last year. Trade for the past 
week in both oil and turpentine has 



been about normal for this time of the 
\ear: the ordinary demand having been 
as good as usual from the country, (icn 

erally speaking, prices remain unchanged 

as under, but the weakness of the local 
market is shown by the tact that one 
linn continues to quote three cents low- 
er all round: Raw, 1 in :; barrels, G5c; 
1 barrels and over. 64c. Add three cents 
to this price lor boiled oil I'.o.b. Toron- 
to, Hamilton, London and (luelph, 30 
days. 

For additional prices see current mar- 
ket quotations at the back of the paper. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal. Aug. 9— The chief feature in 
local paint and oil circles continues to 
be the unusually strong call for Paris 
Green, more especially from the eastern 
districts. Makers here are experiencing 
hut a weak demand from Ontario deal- 
ers, as already they appear to have ade 
quate stocks The manufacturers are 
kept very busy in an endeavor to make 
prompt and full shipments. 

Mixed paints are still receiving a good 
call The backwardness of spring com- 
pelled painters to postpone a large frac- 
tion of their work to the summer 
months, thus, for this season of the 
year an unseasonably strong demand 
exists. Extensive renovations and the 
erection of an unusually large number of 
new buildings in local districts is also 
largely responsible for the active calls 
for mixed paints. 

Xo material changes have been made 
in the prices on any lines. 

Turpentine— Local market conditions 
are unchanged. Prices have reached the 
minimum, and the outlook is uncertain. 
Lack of demand in southern markets 
has, however, caused a drop in Ameri- 
can prices of Ik cents during the past 
week. The habit of waiting for lower 
prices by purchasers is probably the 
cause for this decline. Single barrels 
are still quoted at 80 cents. 

Linseed Oil— No further decline has 
occurred in prices. We continue to 
quote : Raw, 1 to 4 bbls., C2o ; 5 lo 9, 
file; boiled, 1 to 1 bbls., G5c; 5 to 
bids , 61c. 

Ground White ' Lead — Supplies 
are quite adequate to the call which at 
present is model ale. Prices are un- 
changed. Government standard, $7.50 ; 
Xo. 1, $7 ; Xo. 2, $ii.7f) ; Xo. H «6.35. 

Dry White /line — Prices are firm 
and unchanged, with a moderate de- 
mand. V.M. Red Seal, 7.'.c; Red Seal, 
7c; French V.M., 6c; Lehigh 5c. 

White Zinc Ground in Oil — Situ- 
ation is unchanged. Prices are 
firm. Pure, X'c: No. 1, 7c; Xo. 2, 5fc. 

Red Lead— Business in this is some- 
what slack. The demand is moderate. 
Prices are firm and unchanged. Genuine 
red lead, in casks, $6.25 ; in 100-ft. 
kegs, $6.50 ; in less quantities at $7.25 
pel LOO lbs. N T o. 1 red lead, casks, $6 ; 
kegs, $6.25, and smaller quantities, $7. 

Glim Shellac — Prices arc unchang- 
ed. Fine orange, 60c. per lb.; medium 
orange, 55c. per ft.; white (bleached), 
65c. 

Shellac Varnish — For shellac 
and varnishes the demand is steadv 
Prices are firm. Pure white bleached 

56 



R RANDBAM-pPERS ON 



Canada's 
Growing 
Time 



Everywhere— from all over Can- 
ada, from east and west, come 
favorable reports of the building 
trades— increased Paint sales 
are reported in every direction. 

Everywhere new buildings are 
going up, properties are being 
improved, public buildings, houses, 
stores are kept in good order. 

PROSPERITY EVERYWHERE 

Prosperity Promotes 
Painting 

Painting Produces 
Profits 

The dealer who has a good House 
Paint line can handle a lot of 
business and make sure profits — 
right along— in any part of Canada. 



fi&J£BS&t\ 



^NDERSON & PO TTS ' 




We are positive from actual 
results that dealers throughout 
Canada cannot handle a better 
House Paint than our 

"ENGLISH" LIQUID 
HOUSE PAINT 

in which the only WHITE LEAD used is 

Brandram's B. B. Genuine 

It gives unequalled covering re- 
sults, durable wearing results and 
continuous and sure selling results 

DRANDKAM-UENDERSON, 

UbhohmI Iwbhumited 
MANUFACTURERS 

Montreal, Halifax, 
St. John, Winnipeg. 

Marshall-Well* Company, Winnipeg, 

Sole distributors for Western Canada. 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, ( HI. AND BRUSH TRACES 



Window Glass 

Come to us for all kinds of glass. Lei us 
quote you on every specification. We have 
immense stocks in our large new warehouses. 

Star Window Glass 
Diamond Picture Glass 
Double Diamond Glass 
Colored Glass 
Rolled Glass 
Cathedral Glass 
Wire Glass 

Heavy 26 oz. 32 oz. Glass 
and Glass of all kinds. 

LET US QUOTE 



A. RAMSAY & SON COMPANY 



Glass 
Dealers 



MONTREAL 



lO to 22 
Inspector St. 



McArtiiuf, Corneille & Co 

MONTREAL 

Olue «nd Gelatine 

An »xt»n«iv» •••ortmant, to ault all raqulramanta. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 



A 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AQENTS IN CANADA 

For th* GENUINE And CELEBRATED 



eii a J French Green 



•f JOHN LUCAS * CO., 

PHILADELPHIA 



English Varnishes 

Of OEAS. TURNER * 80H. 
LONDON. 



What Are Your Oil Profits ? 



Are they all they ought 
to be? 

Do the losses and iht 
expense of handling the 
oils, tai away the difference 
between the cost price and 
the selling price ? 

You Can Increase Your 
Profits. 

You con reduce two- 
thirds of the expense of 
handling and you can stop 
the lossesaltogether by stor- 
ing and handling all your 
oils in Bowser Tanks. 

Catalog V Tells You 
How. 

Write us a postal asking 
for catalog V and wc will 
send it with full informa- 
tion and prices. Tell us 
what oils you handle and 
in what quantities. 




Cut 15-Cellar Outfit. 

For Heavy Oils. 



Write to-day. 



S. F. BOWSER & CO., Limited 



66-68 Fraser Ave. 



Toronto, Can. 



When You Want Real 
Cans 

no matter what kind — for any 
purpose whatsoever— if you in- 
sist upon having the best made 
do not hesitate a moment, but 

ORDER ACME CANS 

Then you will secure the kind of 
can that makes not only an attract- 
ive package, but a package that is 
sanitary and of merit. 



OUR ADDRESS IS 

ACME CAN WORKS 

MONTREAL 



Pl*u« mention HAlDWtW AHD Mitai. when writii 



57 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



shellac, $3.8(1 ; pure orange, $2.60 , No. 
l on 10. 

Ptatty — Manufacturers are busily en- 
gaged filling the orders which arc in- 
creasing in Dumber. Prices arc firm. 
Pun- linseed oil. 51.85 hulk ; in barrels, 
SI. i.i' ; in 25-1*. irons, 51.90; in tins, 
S^ ; bladder putty, in barrels, Jl.f 

Paris Green— The business done this 
> cat will be a record-breaker. Eastern 
districts are at present monopolizing 
the trade. 



Treat galvanized iron the same as 

zinc, l. ut do not use the acid prepara 

tion, nor scratch. Very smooth, bright 
tin plate must be tiist dulled or scratch 
ed and the iirst coat should be oilless. 



UNINFLAMABLE PAINT REMOV- 
ERS. 

Carbon tei ra-chloride forms an excel- 
lenl medium for removing old paint, but 
is too volatile to be used alone. On the 
other hand, it has the property of ren- 
dering inflammable liquids safe when 
used in suitable proportion. Re- 
cently also it has been made niiscible 
with water, since it forms with sulphon- 
ated oils, like Turkey red oil. a gelatine 
ous soap which is perfectly homogen- 
. and will mix with water in all pro- 
portions. Such a solution containing, 
for instance. 1 part of the said gelatin- 
ous soap and i to 1 part of water, when 
stirred up with 1 to 2 parts of carbon- 
tetra-chloride and mixed with alkali and 
spirit, will form a very good paint re- 
mover. Another suitable class of re- 
mover is obtained by dissolving caustic 
alkalies in spirit. For instance, a solu- 
tion containing equal parts of alkali and 
water is wanned with sufficient soap to 
form a gelatinous mass, and diluted 
with strong ale. .hoi. The soap acts on 
the varnish covering the paint, and ex- 
poses the latter to attack by the alkali. 
A French preparation for the same pur- 
pose consist of alkah" cellulose, which 
has been converted into viscose by treat- 
ment with carbon disulphide, and dis- 
solving the product in water. The vis- 
cose is mixed with alkali, and in this 
condition will rapidly corrode even the 
oldest layers of paint, laying the under- 
lying surface bare. — Farben Zeitung. 



HOW TO PAINT IRON, ZINC, ETC. 

The best time tor painting new iron 
is at the foundry as soon after casting, 
or being wrought or rolled, as possible, 
says the Master Painter. Paint it when 
a dry wind or warm sun will act upon 
it; do not paint it in the early morning 
pi damp evening. First see that the iron 
is thoroughly dry and free from rust, 
and then coat with red lead and linseed 
oil, a thin coat, just enough to pene- 
the pores of the iron. The first 
coat must dry hard. Follow up with 
three other coats containing red or 
white lead in as great proportion as 
possible. 

To paint old iron, burn off all rust 
and scale, brush with turpentine or par- 
affin and proceed precisely as with new 

Foi zinc, the first coat should consist 
of white lead, red lead and turpentine, 
tempered with varnish. Wash new rolled 
sheet zinc with a solution of a table- 
spoonful of hydrochloric or nitric acid 
to a gallon of water, or scratch the sur- 
face with No. 2. glass paper before 
painting. 



LIQUID FLOOR WAX. 

R. C. Jamieson & Co., Montreal, are 
putting on the market a new line of floor 
wax. Every householder who has wax- 
ed floors to keep in order knows how 
difficult it is to apply floor wax in stiff 
paste form. The liquid hard floor wax 
manufactured by R. C. Jamieson & Co. 
is put on like oil or varnish with a wide 
Hat brush and the person applying it 
docs not need to kneel. The makers 
claim that it can be applied in one-tenth 
the time and with less than one-tenth 
the trouble and fatigue. Most American 
and Canadian floor wax is largely com- 
posed of beeswax or other soft wax, and 
consequently dries sticky, collects dust, 
and allows dirt to grind into it, spoiling 
the clean appearance and destroying the 
lustre of the wax. This new wax is claimed 
to be entirely free from a vegetable wax, 
and to be hard as stone, drying quite 
free from stickiness, and to give hard, 
durable finish. 

BRIDLING A BRUSH. 

To bridle a tool, one very simple 
method is to form a loop crossed at 
commencement, and wind a sufficient 
number of turns over ity then pass the 
end through the loop and draw it tight- 
ly until the loop is drawn well under 
the bridling; and then cut off close each 
end of the string. This is a neat method 
and does not require tacks. 

Before use brushes should be soaked 
for a short time in water. This tightens 
the bridling, and prevents it slipping off, 
which it would otherwise have a tenden- 
cy to do. 

Fine whipcord or fishing line is better 
than common twine for bridling, says 
the Decorators' Magazine, and it is a 
good precaution to place a band of 
paper round the bristles and tie the 
bridle over it. It can be slipped out 
after the tying has been completed. The 
bridling must not be drawn too tightly, 
as the bristles will swell when put into 
water or paint, and tighten up, and if 
the bridling is too tight the bristles will 
twist and cripple. 



TO REMOVE PAINT SPOTS. 

Where a house is being done up paint 
is not infrequently spilt on doorsteps and 
it is sometimes found difficult to remove. 
In that case make a strong solution of 
potash and wash the steps, simply leav- 
ing the solution to soak in. In a short, 
time the paint will become soft am! then 
can be washed off with soap and water. 
Then use cold water. Paint which has 
been left for some time will yield to 
this treatment. 



Paints are booming now. There is al- 
ways a good demand for floor finishes, 
interior finishes and varnishes and lac- 
quers for furniture, etc. A woman in 
the window demonstrating a good var- 
nish or finish will bring a lot of busi- 
ness into the store. Paint brushes and 
similar goods sell with this line. 

58 




MUNRO'S 

CANADIAN 

METALLIC 

Reliable, Anti-Fouling 

COPPER PAINT 

(Prevents Barnacles and Grass) 

FOR 

SHIPS' BOTTOMS 

YACHTS, LAUNCHES 
AND STEAMBOATS 

This Paint contains a large 
portion of Finely Ground 

METALLIC COPPER 

Directions will be found upon every package. 
See that Each Tin bears the name of 

The Canada Paint 
Company, Limited 

Sole Manufacturers 

Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 









Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



DON'T SELL PAINT 
THAT IS CHEAP AND 
INFERIOR. The Falcon 
Brand for paints and 
varnishes, etc., means 
that they are not only 
good, but that they are 
the very highest grade 
that up-to-date paint 
making can produce. 
There's good money in it for you. 

Send us a sample order and we will prove our statement. 

PHASANTITE 

an ideal water paint. 

FALCONITE 

White Enamel of high-grade. 

LACKER IT E 

Our new Varnish Stains in 12 colors. 




Wilkinson, Hey wood & Clark, umited 

EST. 1706 

300 Notre Dame St., MONTREAL 

Branches and agencies all over the world. 
FRANCIS C. REYNOLDS, Can. Manager. 



Any manufacturer can 
make a green paint. 
But there is only ONE 



IMPERIAL 

FRENCH GREEN 

It lasts years longer 
than any other green. 
Does not lose its 
brilliancy. Be sure the 
label has the name of 

LUCAS 



PHILADELPHIA 
BOSTON 



NEW YORK CHICAGO 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Prove Our Claims at Our Expense 

The manufacturer — not sure of his product — dare not talk in that way over 
his name. Because we know our VARNISH TURPENTINE to be incompar- 
able and because thousands of practical men declare it to be so are our only 
reasons for making such an offer. Test, at our expense, our 

VARNISH TURPENTINE 

It contains no naptha. It is free from benzine. It dries as quickly as spirits 
of turpentine. It cannot leave sticky varnish. And it works just like spirits 
but is infinitely safer — having a fire test 40 degrees higher than benzine. We 
guarantee that every barrel of our Varnish Turpentine will do any work that 
spirits will do, and do that work better. Test it at our expense. 

The Defiance Mfg. ®> Supply Co. 



TORONTO 



ONTARIO 



59 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES Hardware and Metal 



SOLDERS 



Guaranteed Half and Half. Strictly Half and Half. 

Commercial Half and Half. 



Star Wiping. Acme Wiping. Angle or Oval, 



Wire, any Size or Gauge. 



Segment Ribbon. 

CLOSE PRICES. QUICK DELIVERIES. 

The CANADA METAL CO., limited 

TORONTO 



Growth of Canada's Export 

Trade. 

Value of Annual Exports from Canada : 

1886— $85,251,314.00 1896 -$118,011,508.00 1906 -$256,586,630.00 

What is YOUR share of this ever-increasing business ? 

THE BEST WAY to reap the profits of foreign trade is through the unique foreign trade service of the 

AMERICAN EXPORTER. 

HALF A THOUSAND Manufacturers use this method of reaching the buyers abroad. Among them : 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Limited - -Montreal Qoold, Shapley & Muir Co. - - - Brantford 

Waterous Engine Works Co. - - Brantford Brantford Carriage Co. ... Brantford 

Canada Horse Nail Co. .... Montreal Metallic Roofing Co. .... Toronto 

Sylvester Bros. Mfg. Co. ... Lindsay Page Wire Fence Co., Limited - - Walkervllle 

V&° ANNUAL HARDWARE NUMBER PUBLISHED AUGUST 1st ^ 

AMERICAN EXPORTER 

Established 1877 Conducted by Export Specialists 

1 35 William Street, New York City, U.S.A. 

6o 






Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND I'.KUSH TR \l 




Must be accomplished by right methods. Progressive 
merchandising requires powerful and direct advertising of 
you and your business. If you would like to secure the 
co-operation of one of the oldest and largest paint manu- 
facturing concerns in the world in giving you a bigger 
reputation as a live, up-to-date dealer, increasing your busi- 
ness and helping you 



To MaKe More Money 

this season than ever before in your business history all you have to do is to sit 

down and write to the makers of Martin-Senour Paint 

Ask us for our special proposition to 

agents and how we advertise dealers who handle our 

goods. We'll tell you something to your advantage. 

The MARTIN-SENOUR CO. Ltd., 

"Pioneers of Pure Paints" 
142-144 Inspector Street. Montreal. 
2514-2522 Quarry St. and Archer Ave.. Chicago. (Est. 1878.) 

The Winnipeg I'aint & Glass Co. Ltd., Tbe Maritime Paint & Varnish Co. Ltd., 
Winnipeg. 



Halifax, N. S. 



^»»~tt****^*^^ 



I—— II 





1007. Durability 



BUSINESS INSURANCE 

The shrewd dealer takes out a policy assuring lasting cominercia 
success by stocking a paint with lasting qualities. The business 
acumen of hardware men accounts for the ever-increasing sales of 

ARK BRAND PAINT 

because of its durability and lasting lustre. You can preach economy 
to your customers when recommending Ark Brand Paint. The best 
paint is always the most economical for your customers to use To 
preach economy is sound business policy. Stocking Ark Brand is 
positive assurance of the paying trade and a lasting reputation. 

MURESCO WALL FINISH 

is so much superior to the next best Wall Finish that it stands 
in a class by itself. Muresco is peerless in quality and 
durability, and the ease with which it is applied makes it 
the next best thing to Ark Brand Paint as a trade-builder 
and profit-maker. 
We have Intereeting particulars for the man who wants more business. 

Manufactured by 

BENJAMIN MOORE & CO., LIMITED 

(Formerly The Francis-Frost Co., Limited) 

NEW OFFICES AND WORKS : 
TORONTO JUNCTION, CANADA. 

New York. Chicago, Cleveland, Carteret. N.J. 

6i 




H ARDW \ R E AND M ET A L 



WE Cmim to give all round satisfaction to you and yOUT customers. 
BLACK DIAMOND Tarred Felt sells easily always. 

When once used the satisfaction is established, because every part of the paper is alive with quality 
line-- have the same strong pulling power, and you should get after this trade in your district. 

OUR WRAPPING PAPER HAS NO RIVAL ON THE MARKET. ASK FOR THE BRAND. 



All our 



Our Brands : 



♦ 



Black Diamond 
Tarred Felt 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



Joliette and Cyclone 
Sheathing 



Alex. McArtKur (SL Co., Limited, 



82 McGill St. 
Montreal 



C >jX. Winnipeg, Solo Agent for Northwest Provinces 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



August 9. 1907 

These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
aealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 



METALS 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's per lb V 

HaUett's 16i 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES. 

Plates, i to 4 inch, per 100 lb.. 2 40 2 50 

Heads, per 100 lb 2 65 2 75 

Tank plates 3-16 inch 2 60 2 50 

Tubes per 100 feet, 1 1 inch .. 8 25 8 50 

•• •• 2 " .. 9 '.0 9 1" 

24 " .. 10 50 11 00 

3 " .. 12 0' 12 50 
34 ' .. 15 00 16 00 

4 " . . 19 85 20 00 

BOILER AND T.K. PITT8. 
PUin tinned and Spun, 25 oer cent, off list. 
BABBIT METAL 

Canada Met al Company— Inn,, riol.gemiine 
80c.; Imperial Tough. 60c.; White Brass, 50c; 
Metallic. 35c ; Hams Heavy Pressure, 25c,: 
Hercules, S5c ; Wnite Bronze. 15c; Star 
Fri tionless, 14c; Alluminoid, lCc; No. 4, 
9c. per lb. 

James Robertson Co —Eitra and genuine 
Monarch, 60c: Crown Monarch. 50c ; No. 1 
Monarch. 40c; King. 30c; Fleur-de-lis, 20c ; 
Thurber, 15c; Philad-lphia. 12c; Canadian, 
10c : hardware, No. 1. 15c; No. 2, 12c; No. 3, 
10c per lb. 

BRASS. 

Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 25 p.c. advance. 

Sheets. 12 to 14 in 30 

Tubing, base, per lb 5-16 to 2 in 33 

Tubing J to 3-inch, iron pipe size. . 31 

1 to 3-inch, seamlesB 36 

Copper tubing, 6 cents extra. 

COPPER. Per 100 lb. 

Castinu ingot 23 I 23 M 

Cut lenirrhs, round, bars, J to 2 in. . . 35 00 

Plain sheets. 14 oz 36 00 

Plain, 16 oz„ 14x48 and 14x60 .... 35 00 

Tinned copper sheet, base 38 00 

Planished base 43 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 'x6 ft., 25 

to 30 lb. each, per lb., base.. 34 35 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

I to 10 gauge 2 70 2 75 

12 gauge 2 70 2 75 

14 " 2 50 2 60 

17 " 2 50 2 60 

18 " 2 50 2 «0 

20 " 2 50 2 60 

22 •• 2 55 

24 " 2 55 2 70 

26 " 2 65 2 85 

28 •• 2 70 3 00 

CANADA PLATES 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 2 75 3 05 

All bright " 3 75 4 05 

Galvanized - Dom. Crown. Ordinary. 

18x24x52 . 4 45 4 35 

60 4 70 4 60 

20x28x80 8 90 8 70 

. .. 9 40 9 20 



GALVANIZED SHEETS. Colborn • 
Crown 
I! W Queen's Fleur- Gordon (iorbal's 

gauge Head de-Lis Crown Best 
Itf-M . 3 95 3 80 3 95 

22 -24 . . 4 20 4 05 4 00 4 05 

26 4 45 4 3) 4 40 4 >0 

28 4 7U 4 55 4 60 4 55 

Less than case lots 10 to 25c. extra. 
Apollo Brand. 

24 guage, American 3 85 

26 " " 4 10 

28 " " 4 55 

lUjoz 4 85 

25c. less for 1,000 lb, lots. 

IRON AND STEEL 

Montreal. Toronto. 

Middlesboro, No. 1 pig iron. .21 St) 24 50 

Middlesboro, No 3 pig iron .2" 50 23 50 

Summerlee, " . .25 £0 24 50 

Special " . 24 50 

soft " ..24 00 

Carron 26 00 

Carron Special 24 50 

Carron Soft 24 00 

Clarence, No. 3 2150 23 50 

Glengarrock, No. 1 27 10 

Midland, Londonderry and 

Hamilton off the market 

but quoted nominally at 26 03 

Radnor, charcoal iron 32 00 34 ' 

uommon oar, per 100 lb 2 20 2 30 

Forged iron ' 2 45 

Refined " " 2 60 2/0 

Horseshoe iron " 2 60 2 7n 

Band iron, 1J to 3 in. base 2 80 

Sleigh shoe steel " .... 2 25 2 30 

Tire steel 2 40 2 50 

Best sheet steel 012 

Mining cast steal 08 

Warranted east steel 14 

Annealed east steel '5 

High speed 60 

B.P.L. tool steel 101 11 

INGOT TIN. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $44 00 S45 00 

TINPLATE8. 

Charcoal Plates -Bright 
M.L.S., Famous (jqual Bradley) Per bo« 

10,14 x 20 base $6 50 

IX. 14x20 " 8 00 

IXX, 14x20 base 9 50 

Itavea and Vulture Grades— 

I C. 14 x 20 base 5 00 

IX " 6 00 

IXX " 7 00 

IX X X " 8 00 

'Dominion Crown Best" — Double 

Coated, Tissued. Per box. 

I C, 14x20 base 5 50 5 75 

I X, 14x20 " 6 50 6 75 

IXX x20" 7 50 7 75 

"Allaway's Best "—Standard Quality. 

I C, 14x20 base 4 85 5 00 

I X. 14x20 ' 5 40 5 75 

1 XX, 14 i 20 " 6 15 6 bO 

Bright Cokes 
KeHeeiuer Steel — 

I.O., 14x20 base 4 25 4 35 

20x28, double box 8 50 8 70 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade — 

I.O., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 7 25 8 00 
IX., Terne Tin 9 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Oookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bis. ) 

" 14x60, " > .... 7 50 

: ' 14x65, " J 



Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 

" 26 " 



8 50 

9 00 



LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 5 25 5 35 

Bar, " 5 75 6 00 

Sheets, 2J lb. sq. ft., by roll 6 50 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 6 25 

Cut sheets ic per lb., extra. 

SHEET ZINC. 

5-cwt. casks 7 75 8 00 

Part casks 8 00 8 25 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 75 7 00 

Domestic 6 10 6 75 

COLD ROLLED SHAFTING. 

9-16 to 11-16 inch 06 

J to 1 7-16 ■• 054 

I 7 16 to 3 " 05 

30 per cent. 

OLD .MATERIAL. 
Dealers buying prices : 

Mon'real Toronto 

Heavy copp=r and wire, lb. 17 n 16J 

Light copper 16 15 

Heavy red brass C I IS J 015 

yellow bass u 12 12 

Light brass 084 08 

Tea lead 03 J 04 

Heavy lead U4 01} 

Scrap zinc 03J 04 

No. 1 wrought iron 15 60 1150 

" ■>■ " " 6 tC 6 00 

Machinery cast scrap ... 17 00 16 50 

Stove plate 13(0 12 00 

Malleable and t-teel 8 00 8 0J 

Old rubbers 10J 10 

Country mixed rags, lOOlbs. 100 125 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 

BRAHH OOOD8, VALVE**, ETC. 

Standard Compression work, 57i per cent. 
Cushion work, discount 43 per cent. 
Fuller work, 70 per cent. 
Flatway stop and stop and waste cooks, 60 

per cent. ; round way, 55 per cent. 
J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Cheek Valves, 

45 ; Standard, 55 per cent 
Kerr standard globes, angles and checks, 

special, 421 per cent.; standard, 471 p.c. 
Kerr Jenkins' disc, copper-alloy disc and 

heavy standard valves, 40 per cent. 
Kerr steam radiator valves. 60 p.c, and quick- 
opening hot-water radiator valves, 60 p.c. 
Kerr brass, Weber's straightway valves, 

4j; straightway valves, IB ,M , 60. 
J. M.T. Radiator Valves 50; Standard, 60; 

I'atent Uuiek -Opening Valves. 65 p.c. 
Jenkins' Valves Quotations on application 

to Jenkins' ' ros., Montreal. 

No l < ontpresMoo nai i, . ,,, k net 2 00 

No. 4 " " 1 90 

No 7 Fuller's " 2 v5 

Mo. 4*, " " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cnshiou, basin 

cock, hot and cold, i er dcz $16.. 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

cock, No. 2208 25 

Square head brass cocks, 50 ; iron, 60 p.c. 
Thompson Smoke-'est Machine 25.00 

BOILERS -COPPER RANQE 

Copper, 30 gallon, 833, 15 per ceDt. 

BOILER*— GALVANIZED IRON RANGE. 

30-gallon, Standard, $5; Kxtra heavy, $7.75 



BATH TUBS. 

8teel clad copper lined, 15 per cent. 

CAST IRON SINKS, 

16x24, 91; 18x30, $1 ; 18x36. 91.3X 

ENAMELED HATUS, ETC. 

List issued by the Standard Ideal Com 
pany Jan. 3, 1907. shows an advance of 10 per 
cent, over previous quotations. 

ENAMELED CLOSETS AND URINALS 

Discount 15 per cent. 

HEA1INO APPARATUS. 

Stovei and Ranges— 40 to 70 per cent. 

Furnaces— 45 per cent. 

Registers— 70 per cent. 

Hot Water Boilers— 5U per cent. 

Hot Water Radiators— 50 to 55 p.c 

Steam Radiators— 50 to 5i ijer cent. 

Wall Radiators and "-pedals— 50 to 55 p.c. 

LEAD PIPE 

Lead Pipe, 5 p.c. Off. 
Lead wat.te, 5 p.c. off. 
Caulking lead, 6|c per pound. 
Traps and bends, 40 per cent. 





IRON PIPE. 




Size (per 


100 ft.) Black. 


Galvanized 


} inch 


2 35 J inch. 


3 20 


I " 


2 35 1 " . 


3 20 


I " 


2 90 I " . 


3 75 


1 " 


3 90 ! " . 




1 " 


5 *0 1 " . 


7 25 


1} " 


7 65 U " . 

9 20 1$ " . 


9 90 


1J " 


11 90 


5 *' 




15 80 


2} " 


20 in 24. " . 


26 on 


3 " 


26 75 3 " . 


34 00 


3J " 


34 25 3| " . 


42 75 


4 " 


39 00 4 " . 


48 60 



5 00 



43 
46 



Malleable Fittings— Canadian discount 30 per 
cent.; American discount 25 per cent. 

Oast Iron Fittings 571 ; Standard bushings 
57}.; headers, 57}; Hanged unions 571, mal- 
leable bushings 55 ; tunnies, 70 and 10 ; 
malleable lipped unions, 55 and 5 p.c. 

BOIL PIPE AND KITTING* 

Medium and Ettra heavy ripe and fittings, 

up to 6 inc h, 60 and 10 to 70 per cent. 
7 and 8-iti. pipe. 40 and 5 per '-ent. 
Light pipe, 50 p.c. ; fittings, 50 and 10 p.c 

OAKUM. 

Plumbers ...per 10J lb 4 50 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1-Ib. toll per lb. 451 

2-lb. or over " u 421 

holder. Per lb. 

Montreal Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 25 26 
Wiping 24 23 



PAINTS. OILS AND Oi ASS 
BRCBHH 

Paint and household, 70 per cent... 

CHEMICALS. 

In c sks per lb. 
Sulphate of copper (bluestone or blue 

vit'ol) 09 

Litharge, ground 06 

flaked 1. 06} 

Green co p-ras (green vitrol) 01 

Sugar of lead '■« 

wump olive 01 j 

COLORS IN OIL. 

Venetian red, 1-lb. tins pure u 0*3 

Chrome yellow " .... u 15 

Golden ochre " 10 

French " " .... 08 

Marine black " .... 04; 

Chrome green " 09 

Frenoh permanent green" 13 

Slgnwriters' black " .... IS 



62 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Clauss Brand Tinner Snips 

Fully Warranted 

Steel Faced on solid steel. Japan 
Handles, Highly Finished Blades. 

Write for Trade Discounts. 




The Clauss Shear Co., 



Toronto, Ont. 



OLITE. 

Domestic sheet 10 104 

Frenoh medal 12 124 

PARIS GREEN. 

Bergers Canadian 

6001b. cask 27} 

2501b. drama 28 S7J 

100-lb. " 29} •••■ 

50-lb. " 29} 281 

Mb. pkga, 100 in box 30} 29} 

i/..lb. " 32} 311 

lib. tin.. 100 in hox 31} 30} 

'/,-lb. tins 33} 32 

PARIS WHITE. 

In bbls 95 

PIGMENTS. 

Orange mineral, casks (8 

100-lb. kegs 081 

PREPARED PAINTS. 

Bam (in bbls.) 85 90 

Sherwin-Williamspaints, 155 

Canada Paint Co. s pure 1 4u 

Standard P. ft V. Co.'s " New Era." 1 30 

Ben j. Moore Co.'s "Ark" Bd .... 125 

" British Navy deck — 150 

Brandram-Henderson's "English" 1 45 

Ramsay's painta, Pure, oer gal 1 30 

Thistle, " .... 1 10 

Martin-Senour's 100 p.c. pure 1 55 

Senour's Floor Paints 1 35 

Jamieson's "Crown and Anchor" 1 20 

Jamieson's floor enamel 150 

" Island City " paint 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's, pure 1 20 

Robertson's pure paints 1 20 

PUTTY. 

Bulk In bbls 1 60 

Bladders in bbls ' 85 

25-lb. tins 190 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb 2 00 

Bulk in 100-lb. irons 1 80 

SHINGLE STAINS. 

In 5 gallon lots 8) 91 

SHELLAC. 

White, bleached 2 65 

Fine orange 2 60 

Medium orange 2 55 

TURPENTINE AND OIL. 

Prime white petroleum 13 

Water white " 14} 

Pratt sacral " 18 

Castor oil 08 10 

Gasoline 221 

Benzine, per gal 17 20 

Turpentine, single barrels 79 8) 

LinBeedOil. " raw.. 61 6C 

boiled 61 67 

WHITE LEAD GROUND IN OIL. Per 100 l^S 

Canadian pure 7 15 7 50 

No. 1 Canadian 6 80 7 15 

Munro's Seleot Flake White 7 65 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure — 7 65 

Monarch 7 40 

Standard Decorator's 7 15 

Essex Genuine 6 80 

Brandram's B. B. Genuine 8 70 

" Anchor," pure 7 40 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 7 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 6 65 

"Crown and Anchor," pure 7 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's — 7 40 

Robertson's C. P., lead 7 20 

RED DRY LEAD. 

lienuiue, 560 lb. casks, per cwt .... 6 25 

• nuine, 1001b. kegs, " .... 6 50 

No. 1. 560 lb. casks, per cwt . .... 6 00 

So. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 6 25 

WINDOW GLASS 

Size United Double 

inches Star Diamond 

Under 26 ... $4 25 $6 25 

26to40 4 65 6 75 

41 to 50 5 10 7 50 

51 to 60 5 35 8 50 

61 to 70 5 75 9 75 

71 to 80 6 25 11 00 

81to85 7 00 12 50 

86 to 90 15 00 

81 to 95 17 50 



96 to 100 20 50 

101 to 105 24 00 

100 to 110 27 50 

Discount— 16-oz., 25 per cent.; 21-oz. 30 per 
cent, per 100 feet. Broken boxes 50 per cent. 

WniTINU. 

Plain, in bbls 70 

Gilders bolted in bands 90 

WHITE DRY ZINC. 

EitraRed Sea), V.M. 07} 08 

WHITE ZINO IN OIL. 

Pure, in 25-lb. irons 084 

No. 1, '■ " 07 

No. 2, " " 05} 

VARNISHES. 

Per gal cans 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 

Pale durable body 3 50 

" hard rubbing 3 00 

Finest elastic gearing 3 00 

Elasticoak 150 

Fiirni \ire, polishing 2 00 

Furniture, extra 115 

" No. 1 90 

" union 80 

Lightoilfinish 140 

Gold sbe japan 1 89 

Brown japan 95 

No. 1 brown japan 95 

Baking black japan 1 35 

No. 1 black japan 90 

Benzine black japan 70 

Crystal Damar 2 80 

No. 1 " 2 50 

Pure asphaltum 140 

Oilcloth 1 50 

Lightning dry er 70 

blast ill te varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 Oil 

Uranitine floor varnish, per gal 2 50 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, 1 20 

Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, gal., 2 50 

Canada Paint Cos sun varnish 2 00 

" Kyanize" Interior Finish 2 40 

" Flint-Lac. "coach. 180 

B H. Cos " Gold Medal," in cases 2 09 

Jamieson's Copaline, per gal 2 00 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE. 

BELLS. 

Brass hand bells, 60 per cent. 

Niokel, 55 per cent. 

Gongs, SargeantB doorbells. . 5 50 8 on 

American, house bells, iter lb. 35 40 

Peterboro' door bells, 37} and 10 off new list. 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 2 25 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 1 00 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 25 

Carpet Felt per ton 60 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 40 00 

Dry Surprise o 45 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " ■' 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred" Fibre " 400 " 65 

0.K.4I.X.L.... " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized " 400 ' 45 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 600 " 100 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Root Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 80 90 

Slater's felt per roll 7U 

Heavy Straw Sheathing f. o. b. St. 

John and Halifax 42 50 

BUTTS. 

Wrought Brass, net revised list. 
Wrought Iron, 70 per oent. 
Cast iron Uoose V in, 60 per cent. 
Wrought Steel Fast Joint and Loose Pin, 
70 per oent. 

CEMENT AND PIREPRICK. 

Canadian Portland 2 00 2 10 

Belgium 1 60 1 90 

White Bros. English 180 205 

" Lafarge " cement in wood 3 40 

"Lehigh" cement, in wood 2 54 



Lehigh" cement, cotton sacks 2 39 

Lehigh cement, paper sacks 2 31 

tire brick, Scotch, per 1,(00 .... 27 00 30 00 

English 17 00 21 00 

American, low 23 25 00 

_. , ,„ " high 27 50 35 00 

Fire clay (Scotch), net ton 4 95 

Pavini; Blocks per 1,000. 
Blue metallic, 9"x4)"x3", ex wharf . . 35 00 
Stable pavers, 12"x6"x2", ex wharf . . 50 00 
Stable pavers, 9"x4}"x3", ex wharf . . 36 00 

DOOR SETS. 

Peterboro, 37} and 10 per cent. 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey's Rod per doz 1 75 

Coil, 9 to 11 in " 95 1 65 

English " 2 00 4 00 

Chicago and Reliance Ooil 25 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 50 and 10 per oent., new list 
Peterboro, 374 and 10 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PIN8. 

Iron, discount 40 per cent. 
Brass, 45 per cent. 

HINGES. 

Blind, discount 50 per cent,. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb. net . 06 

" " 5-in., " : 3 

6-in., " 051 

8-in., " 05} 

" " 10-in. and larger . . 05 

Light T and strap, discount 65 d.c. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

under n in.... per 100 lb 4 65 

over 12 in " 3 65 

Crate hinges and back flaps, 65 and 5 p. c. 
Hinge hasps, 65 per cent. 

SPRING HINGES. 

Spring, per gro., No. 5, $17.50 No. 10, $18 ; 

No. 20, $10.80; No. 120, $20 ; No. 51, 

$10 : No. 50, $27.50 
Chicago Spring Butts and Blanks 124 percent. 
Triple End Spring Butto. 3o and 10 per cent. 
Chicago Floor Hinges, 374 and 5 off. 
Garden City Fire House Hinges, 124 p.c. 
" Chief " floor hinge, 59 p.e. 

CAST IRON HOOKS. 

Birdcage per dor. II SI 110 

Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 JO 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 100 

Wrought hooks and staples — 

i x 5 per gross 2 65 

5-16x5 " .... 3 30 

Bright wire hooka, 60 p c. 
Bright steel gate hooks and staples, 40 p.c. 
Cresent hat and coat wire. 60 per cent. 
Screw, bright wire, 65 per cent. 

KNOBS. 

Door, japanned and N.P., doz 150 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. ft L. 

screw per gross 1 30 2 00 

White door knobs per doz 2 00 

Peterboro knobs, 374 and 10 per c nt. 
Porcelain, mineral and jet knobs, net list. 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian 40 to 40 and 10 per cen' . 

LOCKS. 

Peterboro 37V1 and 10 per com 
Russell ft K.rwin, steel rim $2.50 ner <1or 
Eagle cabinet locks, discount 30 per cent 
American i adlocks, all steel, 10 to 15 per 
cent.; all brass or bronze, 10 to 25 per c< nt. 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

H. ft A sand, discount, 35 per cent 

Emery, discount 35 per oent. 

larnet (Rurton'.l 5 to 10 p«r oent. «il<an - 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

8A8B CORD. 

Per lb 31 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes per lb 07f MO 



WROUGHT STAPLES. 

Galvanized 2 75 

Plain , 2 50 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

Bright spear point, 75 per cent, discount. 



TOOLS AND HANDLES. 

Disoount 22} per cent. 

AUGERS. 
Oilmour's, discount 60 per cent, off list. 

_. , .. AXES. 

Single bit, per doz 6 tO 9.0 

Double bit, " ]0 00 11 (Ni 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes. 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 900 

Red^ Ridge, boys', handled 5 75 

hunters 5 35 

BITS. 

Irwin's auger, discount 47} per cent. 
(iUmour's auger, discourt 60 per cent. 
Rockford auger, discount 50 and 10 per cam 
Jennings' Oen. auger, net list. 
Gilmour s cat, 474 per cent. 
Clark s expansive, 40 per cent. 

Clark's gimlet, per doz 65 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 

NaiJ ind Spike, per gross 2 25 

BUTCHERS CLEAVERS 

German ner doz. 7 00 9 0U 

American " 12 00 18 00 

CHALK. 

Oarpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 
White lump per cwt. 60 65 

CHISELS. 

Wamocka, discount 70 and 5 percent. 
f. S. ft W. Extra, disoount, 70 per cent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

S. 4 D, No. 3 per pair 13 

S. ft D., 5 r < Hi 

S.4D.. " 6 » 18 

Boynton pattern •' pa, 

CROWLARS. 

3'/2C. to 4c. per lb. 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Coach ana Wagon, discount 75 and5pei cent. 
Carpenters' discount 75 per oen' . 

DRILLS. 
Millar's Falls, hand and breast, net list 
North Bros., each set, 50c. 

DRILL bits. 
ivloree, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
standard, disoount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 75 per cent . 

Arcade 75 « 

Kearney 4 Foot 75 

Disstons 75 " 

American 75 " 

J. Barton Smith 75 " 

McCleUan 75 

Eagle 75 

Nicholson 66§ " 

Globe 75 " 

Black Diamond. 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 
lowitt's, English list, 27} per cent. 

GAUGES. 

Stanley '* discount 50 to 60 per cent. 
Winn's, Nob. 26 to 33 ....each 165 2 40 

HANDLES. 

Second growth ash fork, hoe, rake and 

shovel handles, 40 p 0. 
Extra ash fork, hoe, rake and shovel 

handles. 45 p.c. 
No. 1 and 2 ash fork, hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, 50 p.c. 
White ash whiffletrees and neckyokes, 35 p.c 
AU other ash goods, 40 p.c. 
All hickory, maple and oak goods, excepting 

carriage and express whiffletrees, 40 p.c. 
Hickory, maple, oak carriage and express 

whiffletrees. 45 p.c. 

HAMMERS. 
Maydole s, discount 5 to 10 per oent. 
Canadian, discoun-: 25 to 27| per cent. 

Magnetiotack per doz. 110 120 

Canadian sledge per lb. 07 184 

Canadian ball pean, per lb. . . 22 25 



63 



HARDWA R E AND METAL 



MistaKes and Neglected Opportunities 

MATERIALLY REDUCE THE PROFITS OF EVERY BUSINESS 

Mistakes are sometimes excusable but there is no reason why you 
should not handle Paterson's Wire Edged Ready Roofing, Building 
Papers and Roofing Felts. A consumer who has once used Paterson's 
"Red Star' "Anchor" and "O.K." Brands won't take any other kind 
without a lot of coaxing, and that means loss of time and popularity 
to you. 

THE PATERSON MFG. CO., Limited, Toronto and Montreal 



HATCHETS. 

Canadian, discount 40 to 42J per oent. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

~ " 2, " 4 80 

Barrel Underhill 5 05 

HUES. 

Mortar, 50 and 10 per mil 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz. 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 S 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 
Canadian per doz. 5 50 6 0C 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

German, 15 per oent. 
American discount, 33J per cent. 

PICKS. 

Per dozen 600 900 

PLANES. 
Wood bench, Canadian, 4ti, American, 25 
Wood, fancy, :«* to 40 per cent. 
Stanley planes, 31.55 to #3 60, net list prices. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English perdoz. 2 0" 5 Ou 

Stanley, 2J inch, single 24c, double 39c. 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, 37i to 40 per cent. 

Button's imitation perdoz. 5 <HJ 9 00 

Berg's wire fencing 1 72 5 50 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers perdoz. 100 185 

Conductor's " 3 00 15 00 

Tinners , solid per set 72 

" hollow per inch .... 1 00 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 37 J per cent. 

RULES. 
Boxwood, discount 70 per cent. 
CTory, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 



Atkins, band and crosscut, 25 per cent. 
Disaton s Hand, discount 12J per cent 
Disston's Crosscut .. ..per foot 35 55 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

frame only each 50 125 

S. & D. solid tooth circular shingle, con- 
cave and band, 50 per cent ; mill and ice, 
drag, 30 per cent.; oross-cut,35 percent.; hand 
saws, butcher, 35 per cent. ; buck, New 
Century 86 25 ; luck No. 1 Maple Leaf, 
85.25 ; buck, Happy Medium. 84.25 ; buck, 
Watch Spring, 8125; buck, common frame, 
34.00. 

Spear & Jackson's sawR Hand or rip, 26 in., 
812 75; 26 in., 81'. 25; panel. 18 in., 88.25; 
20in.8J; tenon, 10 m., $9.90; 12 in., $10.9i) ; 
14 in, 8U50. 

SAW SETS. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

X -Cut Sets. " 7 50 

Maple Leaf and Premiums saw sets, 40 off. 
8. & D. saw swages, 40 off. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent « perdoz. 65 100 

North Bros., No. 30 . per doz IB 89 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, ducount 45 per cent. 

SQUARES. 

Iron, discount 20 per cent. 

steel, discount 65 and hi per cent. 

Tr» »nd Be**l. discount 50 to 521 per cent 



TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin perdoz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Ohesterman's each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 urn 

Berg's, each 75 2 50 

TROWELS. 

Disston's. discount 10 per cent. 
Q *n„ discount 35 per cent 

Berg s, bri.-k. 924x11 4 00 

pointing, 924x5 2 10 



FARM AND GARDEN GOODS 



American cow bells, 63jj per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
American, farm bells, each . . 1 35 3 0U 



Brook's. 



Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 . . 
No. 2.. 



BULL RINGS. 




Copper, 82.00 for 2J-inch 




CATTLE LEADERS 




Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 


8 b» 


BARN DOOR HANGERS. 




doz. 


pairs 




6 00 




9 00 




6 00 


Perfect 8 00 


11 00 


New Milo. flexible 


6 50 


Steel, track, 1 x 3-16 in(lU0 ft) .... 


3 25 


" l}x3-16in(100ft) .... 


4 75 


Double strap hangers, doz. Bets 


6 40 


Standard jointed hangers, " 


6 40 


Steel King hangers " .... 


6 25 


StormKingandsafetyhangers 


7 00 




4 25 



Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big Twin 
Hangers, 5 per cent. 

HARVEST TOOL8. 

50 and 10 per cent. 

S. & D. lawn rakes, Dunn's, 40 off. 

" sidewalk and stable scrapers, 40 off. 

HAT KNIVES. 

Net list. 

HEAD HALTERS. 

Jute Rope, |-inch per gross 



Leather, 1-inch per doz. 

Leather, 1J " " 

Web 



9 00 
10 00 
12 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



HOES. 

Garden, 50 and 10 per cent. 

Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

LAWN MOWERS 

Low wheel 12, 14 and 16-inch 82 30 

9-inch wheel, 12-inch 2 85 



High wheel, 



n 
i; 

12 
14 
16 



3 iC 

3 12} 

4 05 
4 50 
4 75 

B 25 



SCYTHES. 

Per doz. net fi 25 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SNAPS. 

Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1 ) 00 

STABLE FITTINGS. 

Warden King, 35 per cent 
Dennis Wire i Iron Co., 33i p.c. 

WOOD HAY RAKES. 

40 and 10 per cent. 



HEAVY GOODS, NAILS, ETC. 



ANVILS 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10! 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 091 

Brook's. 80-lb. and over Oil} 

Taylor-Forbes, prospectors 05 

Columbia Hardware Co., per lb 09J 

VISES. 

Wright's n is* 

Berg's, per lb o 124 



121 
3 50 
5 50 

s»wVise .. 4 50 5 00 

Blaoksmiths' (disoount) 60 per cent. 

11 parallel Idisoount) 45 per oent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS 

Carriage Bolts, common 181 list Per cent. 

" " | and smaller. . 60, 10 and 10 

" " 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

" " Norway Iron (83 

list) 50 

Machine Bolts, | and less 60 and 10 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up.... 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 10 

Blank Bolts 55 

Bolt Ends 55 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, 3 and less . . 60 and 10 
" " 7-16 and larger 50 and 5 

Coach Screws, conepoin' 70 and 5 

Nuts, square, ail sizes, 4c. per cent, olf 
Nuts, hexagon, all Bizes, 4}'\ per cent, on* 
Stove Rods per lb., 5} to 6c. 
Stove Bolts, 75 per cent. 



Proof coil, perl00 1l> ; in , 86.03; 5-16 in., 
84,85; i in.. 84.2..; 7-16 in , 84 00; J in, 83 75; 
9-16 in. 33 7"; t in., $3 65; J in., 8J 80; i in., 
83.45; 1 in. 83.40. 

Huiitr, kennel and post chains, 4(1 in w ami 

5 per cent ; tjow tien, -to per rent. ; Vie out 
chains 65 per cent. ; Sinn Axiurer, 35 per 
cent ; I raon chac, to per cent. ; lack rhatu 
Iron, 50 per cent. ; lack chain, uraso, 50 per 
cent. 

HORSE NAILS 

M R.M. mid forged process, list May 15,1907, 

50 and 5 per ceni. 
"o" urand, 574 percent, off lis' . 
Capewell brand, quotations on application. 

HORSESHOES. 

M.R.M. brand: iron, light an 1 medium 
No. 1 aud smaller, 83.90; No. 2 and larger, 
$3.65; oiiow pattern No. 1 and smaller $4.15, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.90; "XL." new ight 
steel, No. 1 and smaller, $4 S>5 ; No 2 and 
larger, 84 ; "X. L " featherweight steel. No. 
to 4, $5 60; toe-weight, all sizes, $6.85. 
F.o.b Montreal. Extras for packing. 

Belleville brand: No. and 1, light and 
medium iron. $3.90; snow, jj4.1t ; light Bteel, 
$4.25; No. 2 and lareer, light and medium 
iron, 83.65; snow. 83.90; light steel, S4. 
F.o.b. Belleville. Two per cent., 30 days. 

hORSE WklGHTS. 

Taylor Forbes, 4}c per lb. 

nails. Cut. Wi e. 

2d 4 00 HO 

3d 3 15 3 20 

4 and 5d 2 90 2 90 

6 and 7d 2 80 2 8 1 

8 and 9d 2 65 2 65 

10 and 12d 2 60 2 60 

16and20d 2 55 2 55 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 50 2 5u 

F.o.b. Montreal, Cut nails, Toronto 20c. 
higher. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 per cent 
Coopers' nails, discount. 40 per oent. 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

PreBBed spikes, 8 diameter, per 100 lbs $3.15 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60, 10 and 10. 
Iron Burrs, discount 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
Copper Rivets, usual proportion burrs, 15 p 
Copper BurrB only, net list. * 

Extras on Coppered Rivets, ij-lb. packages 

lc. per lb.; J-lb. packages 2c. lb. 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 4c. per lb. 

screws. 
Wood, F. H., bright and steel, 85 and 10 p c. 
R. H., bright, 80 and 10 pei cent. 

" F. H., brass, 7F and 10 per cent. 

" R. H., " 7" and 10 per cent. 
F. H., bronze, 70 and 1 i per oent. 

" R. H., " 65 and 10 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 874 per cent. 
Bench, wood perdoz. 3 25 4 00 

" Iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 



MACHINE SCREWS. 

Flat head, iron and brass, 35 per cent. 
Felister head, iron, discount 30 per cent. 
" " brass, discount 25 per cent. 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 
Carpet tacks, blued 75 p.c. ; tinned, 80 
and 10 ; (in kegs), 40 ; cut tacks, blued, in 
dozens only, 75; J weighs, 60; Swedes 
cut tacks, blued and tinned, bulk, 75 
dozens, 75 ; Swedes, upholsterers', bulk, 85 
and 12} ; hi-UBh, blued and tinned, bulk, 70; 
Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and japanned, 
75 and lift; zino tacks, 35; leather carpet ; 
tacus, 40 ; copper tacks, 25 ; copper nails 30 ; 
trunk nails, black, 65 ; trunk nails, tinned and 
blued, 65 ; clout nails, blued and tinned 65 ; 
chair nails, 35; patent brads, 4T; tine finish- 
ing. 40; lining lacks, in papers, If; lining 
larks, in bulk, If ; lining tacks, solid heads, 

in milk, 7P ; saddle nails, in raper*, If ; 

addle nails, in bulk, " ; tufting button', 22 
"ne in dozens only, 60; zino glaziers' points, 
5; double nnin ted tacks, papers,' 90 ami 'I ; 
double pointed tacks, bulk, 40; c.'ineh and 
du k rive.*, 45 ; cheese box ts>cks, 85 and 5 
trunk tacks, 80 and 10. 

WROUGHT IKON WA-HERS. 

Canadian make, discount 40 p r r cent. 



SPORTING GOODS. 

CARTRIDGES. 

" Dominion " Rim Fire Cartridges and 
C.B. caps, 50 and J per ren' ; Rim Fire 
B.B. Round Caps 60 and 2* per cei t ; 
Centre Fire, Pi tol and Rifle Cartridges 
30 p.c; Centre Fire Sporting and Mi itary 
Cartridges, 2i and 5 pa; Rim Fire, Shot 
Cartridges, 6" and 7'/i P.O.; Crntre Fire, Shot 
Cartridges, 3U p.c; Primers, 25 p •;. 

LOADED SHELLS. 

"Crown" Black Powder, 15 and 5 p.c; 
"Sover.- igo" Empire Bulk Smokeless Powder, 
30 and 5 p.c; 'Regal" Ballis ite Dense 
smokeless Powder, 3:* and 5 p.c ; "Imperial" 
Empire or Ballittite Powder, 30 and l'i p.c. 

EMPTY SHELLS 

Paier Shells, 25 and 5; Brass Shells, 
5 and 5 p.c 

Wadp. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, In 

i-lb. bags 80 70 

KeBt thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 50U each, 12 and smaller gauges 29 
Best thick white card wads in boxes 

of 500 each. 10 gauge 35 

I bin oard wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges ') w 

Ihin card wads, in boxes of 1,ui0 

each. lOgange 25 

i heroically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge u «, 

9 and 10 gauges U 7u 

and 8 " o % 

5 and 6 " I Hi 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads in . 
boxes of 250 each- 
Hand smaller gauge 116 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 ,r I 65 

5 and 9 " 1 90 

SHOT. 

Ordinary drop Bhot, AAA to dust $7.50 per 
100 lbs. Discount 5 per cent ; cash discount 
2 ncr cent. 30 days ; net extras as follows 
subject to "ash discount only ; Chilled, 40 c; 
buck and seal, 80c; no 28 hall, $1 20 per 100 
lbs.; bags less than 25 lbs., Jc. per lb.; K.o.M. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton. London. St. 
John and Halifax, and freight equalized 
thereon. 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 30 and 10 per oent. 
Game, Hawley k Norton, 50, 10 it 5 percent 
Game, Victor, 70 per cent. 
Game, Oneida Jump (B. & L.) 40 & 2J p. 
Game, steel, 60 and 6 per oent. 

SKATER. 

Skates, discount 37V4 P*r cent. 
Empire hockey sticks, per doi . . 3 00 



6 4 



\A/e» mak. 



IT A R D W A R F. A N D METAL 
loctric Fixtures, SocRo-ts, and Cut-Oute 




Llectrical Supplies of all kinds. 



rvioisi 



AL.. 



Wo Waste Circulation Z.^ZZJZ'JZ?- "" 






CUTLERY AND SILVER 
WARE. 

razors. per doz. 

EUlofe 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

" King Cutter 13 50 18 50 

.Vade ft Butchers 3 60 10 00 

Lewis Bros.' " Klean Kutter' 8 50 10 50 

Henckel's 7 50 20 00 

Berg's 7 50 20 00 

Clauss Razors and Strops, 50 and 10 per cent 

KNIVES. 

Farriers-Staeey Bros., don 3 50 

PLATED GOODS 

Hollowware, 40 per cent, discount. 
Flatware, staples, 40 and 10, fancy, 40 and 5. 
Hutton's "Cross Arrow' flatware, 47%; 

"Singalese" and "Alaska " Nevada silver 

flatware, 42 p.c. 

SHEARS. 

Clauss, niokel, discount 60 per cent. 
Clauss, Japan, discount 674 per cent. 
Clauss, tailors, disoount 40 per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per oent- 
Bergs 6 00 12 00 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS. 

APPLE PARERS. 

Hudson, per doz., net 5 75 

BIRD CAGES. 

Brass and Japanned, 40 and 10 p. c. 

COPPER AND NICKEL WARE. 

Copper boilers, kettles, teapots, etc. 30 p.c. 
Copper pitts, 20 per cent. 

KITCHEN ENAMELEL WARE. 

White ware. 75 per cent. 
Loudon and Princess, 50 per cent. 
Canada, Diamond, Premier. 5" and 10 p.c. 
Pearl, Imperial, Crescent and granite steel, 

30 and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
Star decorated steel and while, 25 per cent. 
Japanned ware, discount 45 per cent. 
Holiow Wire, tinned cast, 35 per cent. off. 

• KITCHEN SUNDRIES. 

C .n o ieners, per doz 40 75 

Mincing knives per doz 50 u 80 

Duplex mouse traps, per doz 65 

Potato mashers, wire, per doz.. . 60 70 

wood " . . oO u 60 

Vegetable sheers, per doz '25 

Universal meat chopper So. 1 1 15 

Enterprise chopper, each 1 30 

Spiders and fry pans, 50 per cent. 

Star Al chopper 5 to 32 1 35 4 10 

lOOto 103 1 35 2 00 

Kitchen hooks, bright 60 

LAMP WICKS. 

Disoount, 60 per cent. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

METAL POLISH. 

Tandem metal polish paste 6 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Poroelain head per gross 1 35 I 50 

Brass head 40 100 

Tin and gilt, picture wire, 75 per ceut 

BAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 90 

No. 50. nickle-plated, " 95 

" handles, japaned, per gross 9 2i 

nickled, " 9 75 

Common, plain 4 25 

" plated 8 M) 

sbestoa, per set 1 5J 

TINWARE. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

2-in. plain or corrugated., per 100 feet, 

fl.30; Sin, $4.40; 4 in., $5.89; 5 in., $7.45; 
in., $9.90. 

FAUCETS. 
Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per oent. 

KAVETROUOHS. 

10-lnob per 100 ft. 3 30 

IAOTORT MILK CANS. 

Disoount off revised list, 35 per cent. 
Milk oan trimmings, discount 25 per cent. 
Oreamery Cans, 45 per cent 



LANTERNS. 

No. 2 or 4 Plain Cold Blast .... per doz. 6 50 

Lift Tubular and Hinge Plain, " 4 75 

No. 0, safety " 4 00 

Better quality at higher prices. 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

Prism globes, per doz., $1.20. 
OILERS. 

Kemp's Tornado and McClarys Model 
galvanized oil can, with pump, 5 gal- 
lon, per dozen 10 92 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent. 

Zinc and tin, discount 50 per cent. 

Coppered oilerB, 20 per cent. off. 

Brass oilers, 50 per cent, off. 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

PAILS (GALVANIZED). 

Dufferin pattern pails, 45 i.er cent. 

Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 

Oalvanized washtubs 40 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 35 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flariLg sap buckets, discount 35 per cent. 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 35 per cent. 
Copoer bottom tea kettles and boilers, 30 p.c. 
Coal hods, 40 per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, 75 and 124 per cent, off revised list. 
RetiLned, 72J per oent. revised list. 

SAP SPOUTS 

Rronzed iroD with hooks per 1,000 

Eureka tinned steel, hooks 



00 



STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 7 64 7 91 

7 inch " " .... 8 18 

Nestable, discount 40 per cent. 

STOVEPIPE ELBOWS 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 32 

finch " 1 48 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 per oent. 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Per doz 3 00 15 

Clauss, disoount 35 per oent. 

TINNERS' TRIMMINGS. 

Discount, 45 per cent. 



WIRE. 

ANNEALED CUT HAY BAILING WIRE. 

No. 12 and 13, $4; fco. 13J, $4.10; 
No 14. S1.2-; No. 15. $4.50; in lengths & to 
11', 25 per cent.; other lengths 20c. per 10 J 
lbs extra ; if eye or loop on end add 25c. per 
100 lbs. to the above. 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS 

Discount f0 per cent. 

CLOTHES LINE WIRE. 

7 wire solid line. No. 17 $4.90; No. 
18, $3.00; No. 19, $3.7"; ■' wire solid line, 
No. 17. $4.45: No. 18, $3.10; No. 19. $2 8). 
All nriees per 1000 ft m*»*«iir* ; 6 strand, No. 
18, $2 60; No. 19. $290. F.o b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, MontreaL 

OO'LED SPRIN" »'»' 

High n»rbon, No. 9, $2 95; No. 11. $3.50; 
No. 1?, $3.20. 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE. 

Discount 375 per cent. 

FINE STEEL WIRE. 

Discount 25 per cent List of extras 
In 100- lb. lots: No. 17, $5 — No. 18' 
$5.50 - No. 19, $6 - No. 20, $6.65 - No. 21 
$71 — No. 22, $7.30 — No 23, $7,65 — No- 
24, $8 — No. 25, $9— No. 26, $9.50— No. 27, 
$10— No. 28, $11— No. 29, $12— No. 30, $13- 
No. 31, $14— No. 32, $15— No. 33, $16— No. 34, 
$17. Extras net — tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2— Nos. 26-31, $4^Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
75c.— oiling, 10c.— in 25-lb. bundles, 15c.— in5 
and 10-lb. bundlea, 25o.— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c. 
—in J-lb. hanks, 38c.— in J-lb. hanks, 50o.— 
packed ir casks or oases, 15o.— bagging or 
papering, 10c 

F»NOE STAPLES. 

Bright 2 80 Oalvanized ... J2 



HAY WIRE IN COLLS. 

No 13, $2.70 : No. 14, $2.80 ; No. 15, $2.95 ; 
f.o.b., Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE. 

Per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5, $3.9C - 
Nos. 6, 7. 8, $3.3) — No. 9, $2.85 — 
No. 10. $3 41 — No. 11, $3.45-No. 12, $3.00 
—No. 13, ».') 10- No. 14. $3.95— No 15, $4.30 
—No. 16. $4.30 from stock. Base sizes, Nob. 
6 to 9, $2.35 f.o.b. Cleveland. Extras for 
cutting. 

LIOHT STRAIGHTENED WIRE. 

Over 20 in. 

Gauge No. per 100 lbs. 10 to 20 in. 5 to 10 in. 

to 5 $0.50 $0.75 $1.25 

6 to 9 0.75 1.25 2 00 

10 to 11 1.00 1.75 2.50 

12 to 14 1.50 2.25 3.50 

15 to 16 2.00 3.00 4.50 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. 

No. 0-9 gauge, $2.40; No. 10 gauge, 6c- 
extra ; No. 11 gauge, 12c extra ; No. 12 
gauge, 20c. extra ; No. 13 gauge, 30c. extra ; 
No 14 gauge. 40c. extra; No. 15 gauge. 55c. 
extra ; No. 16 gauge, 70o. extra. Add 60c. 
for coppering and $2 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire 10c., 
spring wire $1.25, bright soft drawn 15c. , 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in casks 
or cases 15c, bagging and papering 10c. 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb 
hanks, 50c, iu J-lb. hanks 75c, in 1-lb. 
hanks $1. 

POULTRY NETTING. 

2-in. mesh, 19 w. g., 50 and 5 p.c. off. Other 
sizes, 50 and 5 p.c. eft, 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolls. J1.72V4. per 
100 sq. ft.; in 50-ft. rolls $1.77 l / 2 , per 100 sq ft. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 2 95 

Galvanized, plain twist . 3 30 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland. $2 70 for 
small lots and $2.60 for oarlo' s 



WOODENW^RE. 

CHURNS. 

No. 0, $9 ; No. 1, $9 ; No. 2, $10 ; No. 3, 
$11 ; No. 4, $13 ; No, 5, $16.; f.o.b. Toronto 
Hamilton, London and St. Marys, 30 and 30 
per cent.; fob. Ottawa, KiDgston and 
Montreal, 40 and 15 per cent, discount, 

CLOTHES REELS). 

Davis Clothes Reels, dis, 40 per cent. 

FiBRE WARE. 

Star pails, per doz $ 3 00 

Tubs, " 14 00 

1 '• " 12 00 

2 " " 10 tO 

3 " " 8 50 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 

3 to 6 feet, 12c. per foot ; 7 to 10 ft., 13c. 
Waggoner Extension Ladders, dis. 40 per cent. 

MOPS AND IRONING BOARDS. 

" Best ' mops 125 

TOO "mops 125 

Folding ironing Loards 12 00 16 50 

REFRIGERATORS 

Discount, 40 per cent. 

SCREEN D00R8. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. Btyle per doz. 7 25 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, grained 
only, 4-in., style per doz. 7 55 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, light stair 
pel doz 9 55 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting per doz 60 00 

Square " ' 63 00 

Eclipse, per doz 54 00 

Dowswell " 39 00 

New Century, per dor 75 00 

Dais* 54 "e 

Stephenson 7400 



WRINGERS. 

Royal Canadian, 11 In., per doz. ... 35 00 

Royal American. 11 in. .. 35 00 

Eze- 10 in., per doc 36 75 



MISCELLANEOUS 

AXLE GREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 600 700 

Best quality 10 00 12 oo 

BELTING. 

Extra, 60 per cent. 

Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 p.c 

Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cenc 

Lace leather, per side, 75c; cut laces, 80c. 



BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M 

Small heel " 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

per doz. 1 00 



4 25 

4 50 



American . 
Bullard's. 



2 00 

3 16 



1 50 
6 50 

CASTORS. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cent. 
Plate, discount 524 to 574 per cent. 

PINE TAR. 

J pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

" n ... 9 60 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse per doz. 55 100 

Axle " 22 33 

Screw " 22 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 40 

r 'anadian pitcher spout ... 1 80 
Berg'swiug pump, 75 per cent. 

ROPE AND TWINE. 

Sisal 10J 

Pure Manilla 15 

"British' Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 23 

" 5-32 inch 25 27 

4 inch 25 28 

Russia Deep See 16 

Jute 09 

Lath Yarn, single 10 

double 104 

Sisal bed cord 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 8) 

" 72 feet " 95 

Twine. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 

•' " 4-ply 

Mattress twine per lb 33 

Staging " " 27 

BINDER TWINE. 

500 feet, sisal 09J 

500 " standard 

550 " " manilla 

600 " " " , 

650 " " " 

Oar lots. }c. less; 5 ton lots, Jc. less. 
Central delivery. 

SCALES. 

Gumey Standard, 35 ; Champion, 45 p.c. 

Burrow, Stewart ft Milne — Imperial 
Standard, 35 ; Weigh Beams, 35 ; Champion 
Scales, 45 

Kairbanks Standard, 30; Dominion, 50 
Richelieu, 50. 

Warren new Standard, 35 ; Champion, 45 
Weigh Beams, 30. 



27 
25 
29 
45 
35 



STONES— OIL AND SCYTHE. 



Washita per b. 

Hindostan " 

" slip " 

" Axe " 

Deer Creek " 

Deerlick 

" Axe " 

Lily white " 

Arkansas " 

Water-of-Ayr ' 

Scythe per gros* 

Grind, 40 to 200 lb., per ton 

" under 40 lb., ■' .... 

1 200 lb. and over 



25 
06 
18 



3 50 
20 00 





10 
20 
10 
10 
25 
15 

42 

1 50 
10 
5 00 

22 00 
24 00 
28 00 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Aobm i an World H 

\ intantsA Auditor* 14 

Albau> Bard .'. BpsoialtJ Oo 18 

American Exporter 6" 

American Shearer Co 10 

American Sheet and Tinplate Co 13 

Anaatroni Bros. Tool Co SI 

Atkins, K. C A Co 12 

Atla. Mfg. Oo 26 

Australian Hardv.ir. 

B 

Baglan Bay Tin Plate Co 30 

Banwell Horn. Wire Feme Co 26 

Harnett. (J. & H. Co outside back oorer 

Birkett. Thos. & Son Co 4 

r, H * Co 26 

Bow«er, S.F.,»Co, Limited 57 

Brandram Henderson, Limited 

Brantford Roofing Co 19 

Bntinh American Assurance Co 14 

Buffalo Mf«. Co 25 

Burr Mfg Co Ji 

c 

Canada Foundry Co 16 

( 'anada Horse Nuil Oo 28 

Canada liuu Furuaoe Co 4y 

Canada Metal Co 

Canada Paint O 58 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works 54 

Canadian Copper Co 30 

Canadian Fairbanks Co . 78 

Canadian Heating A Veotilatliig Co. . 18 
Canadian Rubber Co. . outside back cover 

Canadian Hewer P>ne Oo 15 

Capewell Horse Nail Co 32 

Carriage Mountings Co 31 

Caverhill. l^earmont & Co 7, 31 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., inside back cover 

Cl»u«* Shear Oo 63 

Confederation Life Assurance Co 14 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 52 

Contract Record 18 

Consumers Coi d we Co It 

Covert Mfg. Co 31 

Crain, Rolla L 1 

D 

Dana Mfg Co 27 

Davenport. Pickup & Co 16 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg Oo 4 



Defiance Mfg Oo 55 

I n inns \\ ire and Iron Co 15 

Dleokraann. Ferdinand 53 

Dominion Wire Mfg Oo '-' ' 

Dor ken Bros 24 

Dowswell Mfg. Co 10 



Km- B| why Oo 



. . Inside back cover 



Perroateol Companj 19 

Forman, John 55 

Forsyth Mfg. Co 23 

Forwell Foundry Oo 2'.! 

Pox. C. H 31 

Frothingham 4 Workman 6 



(ialt Art Metal Oo 15 

Oibli. Alexander ...31,55 

Gilbertsun, W . A Co 54 

Greening, B.. Wire Oo 24 

Grcenway, Wni. O 26 

Guelph Stove Co 20 

Guelph Spring & Axle Co 15 

I. iimey Foundry Co 21 

Gutta Percha A Rubber M f g. Co 

outside back covet 

H 

Hamilton Cotton Co 31 

Hamilton Rifle Co 30 

Hanover Portland Cement Co 12 

Hams, J. W., (Jo 61 

Hart & Cool, y 19 

Heinirch. R...-tonsCo 47 

Hobi.s Mg. Co 28 

Hopkins & Allan Arms Co i3 

Hotel Directory 14 

Howland H. a., Sons A Co 5 

Hutton, Jan.. * Co 31 

Hutton, Win., A Sons, Ltd 29 

Hyde.F. A Oo 22 

I 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co 54 



J antes & Re'd 1 \ 

Jamieson, R. O., & Oo 55 

Jardine. A. B. A Oo 15 

Johnson's, Iver. Arms and Cycle, Works 49 

Jones Register Co 19 



K la t Co 16 

Kemp Mfg. Oo 3'J 

Kerr EDgiDe Co 23 



Legal dipt 14 

Ixjelie, A. C, * Co 19 

1 ewis Bros., Limited 3 

Lewis, Rice, A Bon inside front cover 

Lockerby A McComb 12 

London Foundry Co 9 

London Rolling Mills 12 

Lucas, John 69 

Lufkin Rule Oo inside back cover 

Lysagbt, John outside front cover 

Mc 

McArthur. Corueille A Co 57 

McAnhur. Alex.. A Oo 62 

MoOaskill, Dougall A Oo 28 

McOlary Mfg. Oo VI 

MoDougall, R.. Co n8 

MoGlashan-Clarke Co.. Ltd 30 

M 

Mujcstie Polishes 31 

Maple City Mfg. Co 29 

Maxwell, David A Sons 10 

Martin-Senour Oo 61 

Metal Shingle and Siding Oo 28 

Motallio Rooting Oo 47 

Metropolitan Bank 14 

Millen, John A Son . . outside ba' k c ver 

Mitchell, H W 31 

Mm In 11 Self TisiingCode Co 15 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co 49 

Moore, Beojamin, & Oo 61 

Morrison, James, Bras« Mfg. Co 23 

Morrow, John, Screw, Limited 47 

MunderlohAOo 65 

N 

Newman, W., A Sons 12 

Nicholson File Oo 67 

North Bros. Mfg. Oo I 

Novr Scotia sr»nl and Cul On 49 

Novelty Mfg. Co 27 



Oakey, John, A Sons 3) 

Oneida Community 1 

Ontario Lantern A Lamp Co 25 

Ontario Steel Ware Co 11 



Ontario Tack Co 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co 12 

Oshawa Steam A Gas Fittings Oo 22 

Owen Sound Wire Kenoe Co 16 



Page Wire Fence Co 31 

Patersou Mfg. Oo 64 

Pearson, Geo D. A Co 17, 31 

Pease Foundry Co 53 

Pelton, Godfrey 8 55 

Penberthy Injector Oo 24 

Peterborough Lock Oo 10 

Pink, Thos 9 



Ramsay, A., A Son Co 57 

Robertson. James Co. . . . inside back cover 

Roper. I. H 16 

Ross Rifle Co 68 

s 

Samuel, ,M . A L. , Benjamin, A Oo 2 

Sanderson, Pearcy A Co 55 

Seycour, Henry T., Shear Co 28 

Sharratt A Newth 54 

Sherwin-Williams Oo 51 

Shurly A Dcitrich 8 

Sinionds Canada Saw Co 17 

SimondsMfg. Co 21 

Spear A Jac k-ion 11 

Stairs, Son A Morrow 67 

standard Ideal Co 24 

Stanley Rule A Level Co 15 

Standad Paint Co. 27 

Steel Trough A Machine Oo 22 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works... 55 

Stephens, O. F.. A Oo 44 

Sterne, G. F.. A Co 22 

Still, J. H ,Mfg 13 



Taylor-Forbes Oo outside front cover 

Thompson. B. A S. H . . Oo. outside back cover 

Tobi" Tent A Awning Co 17 

Toronto snd Belleville Roll ng Mills. . 26 
Turner Brans Works 31 

w 

WeBtern Assurance Co 14 

Western Wire Nail Oo 10 

Wilkinson, Heywood A Clark 69 

Winnipeg Paint and Glass Oo 45 

Wright.. K. T.. A O 65 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS 



Alabastine. 

Alabastine Co., Limited. Paris, Out. 

Auditors. 
Davenport, Pickup A Co., Winnipeg. 

Automobile Accessories. 

Canadi Cycle A Mo' or Co., Toronto 

Junction. 
Carriage Mountings Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Awnings. 

TobiD Tent and Awning Co., Ottawa 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
Frothingham A Workman, Montreal. 
Robertson, Jas. Co,, Montreal. 

Bar Urns. 

Buffalo Mfg. C > , Buffalo, N. V. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co.. Buffalo. N Y 
Carriage Mountings Co., Ltd , Toronto. 
Forsyth Efg. Co.. Buffalo NY 
Ontario Metal Novelty Co., Toronto 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. 

Toronto. 
6adler A Haworth Toronto. 

Bicycles and Accessories. 

Johnson s. Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 
Fitchburg. MaBs 

Binder Twine. 

Consumers Cordage Co., Montreal. 

Bolts. 

Toro- to A Belleville Rolling Mills, 
Belleville. 

Box Strap. 

J. N. Warmimon, Montreal. 

Br ass Goods. 

Frothingham A Workman, Mo ntreal. 
Glauber Brass Mfg. Co.,Clevel and, Ohio. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Lewis, Rice, A Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
Mueller Mfg. Co., Decatur, 111. 
Penberthy Injector Co.. Windsor, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Bronze Powders. 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works, Mon- 
treal. 

Brushes.\ 

United Factories. Toronto. 

Cans. 

Acme Can Works, Montreal. 

Builders' Tools and Supplies. 

Covert Mfg. Co.. West Troy, NY. 
Frothingham A Workman Co., Montreal 
Howland. H 8. Sons A Co., Toronto. 



Hyde, F., A Co., Montreal. 

Lewis Bros. A Co., Montreal. 

Lewis, Rice, & Son, Toronto. 

Lockerby A McComb, Montreal. 

Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 

Newman A Sons, Birmingham 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa 

Stanley Rule A Level Co., New Britain 

Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 

Stephens, G. F., Winnipeg. 

Taylor- ForheB Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Carriage Accessories. 

Carriage Mountings Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 

Carriage Springs and Axles. 

Guelph Spring and Axle Co., Guelph. 

Carpet Beateas. 

Ontario Metal Novelty Co., Toronto. 

Cartridges. 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 

Cattle and Trace Chains. 

Greening. B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Chafing Dishes. 

Buffalo Mfg. Oo., Buffalo, N.Y. 
Churns. 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 

Clippers — All Kinds 

American Shearer Mfg. Co. , Nashua, N.H 

Clothes Reels and Lines. 

Hamilton Ootton Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 

Clutch Nails. 

J. N. Warminton. Montreal. 

Congo Roofing 

Buchanan Foster Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cordage. 

Consumers ' Cordage Oo., Montreal. 
Hamilton Ootton Co., Hamilton. 

Cork Screws. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Cow Ties 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton 

Cuspidors. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Cut Glass. 

Phillips, Geo., A Co., Montreal. 

Cutlery— Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., A Son Co., Ottawa. 
Clauss Shear Co., Toronto 
Dorken Bros. A Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham A Workman Montreal. 
Heiniscb's, R., Sons Co., Newark. N.J. 
Howland, H. S. Sons A Co., Toronto. 
Hutton, Wm., A Sons, Ltd., London, 

Eng. 
Lamplough, F. W., A Co., Montreal. 
Phillips, Geo.. A Co., Montreal. 
Round, John, A Son, Montreal. 



Electric Fixtures. 

Canadian General Electrio Co.. Toronto. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderlob A Co., Montreal. 

Electro Cabinets. 

Cameron A Campbell Toronto. 

Euameled Ware 

Kemp Mfg. Co. . Toronto. 

Engines, Supplies, etc. 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

Eavetroughs 

Wheeler A Bain, Toronto 

Fencing— Woven Wire 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Owen 

Sound. 
Panwell Hoxie Wire Fence Co., 

Hamilton. 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co.. G. A H., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Nicholson File Co., Port Hope 
Firearms and Ammunition 
Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington A Richardson Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Johnson's, Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

Fi-bing Tackle. 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Akron, Ohio 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lamplough, F. W., & Co., Montreal. 
Shirreff Mfg. Co., Brockville, Ont. 

Furnaces. 

Pease Foundry Co , Toronto. 

Galvanizing. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Dominion Wire Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Wind Engine A Pump Co., 
Toronto. 

Glass Ornamental 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., I, . union 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Gibsone, J. B., Montreal. 
Pelton, Godfrey S. 
Sharratt A Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., A Sen, London, Eng. 

Handles. 

Still, J. H., Mfg. Oo. 

Harvest Tools. 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Tillson- 
burg, Ont. 

Hockey Sticks 

Still, J. H. Mfg. Co., St. Thomas. 

Hoop Iron. 

Frothingham & Workman, Montreal. 



Montreal Rolling Mills Co , Montreal. 
J. N. Warminton, Montreal. 

Horse Blankets. 

Heney, E. N., A Co., Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills. Montreal. 
Cap well Horse Nail Co., Toronto 
Toronto A Belleville Rolling Milli 
Bellevi le. 

Hot Water Boilers and Radi 
ators. 

Cluff, R. J., A Co Toronto. 
Pease Foundry Co. Toronto. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Oo., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Iron Pumps. 

Lamplough, F. W., A Co., Montreal. 
McDougall, K. , Oo., Gait, Ont. 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Oo., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wright, E. T., A Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Birkett, Thos., A Son Co., Ottawa. 
Frothingham A Workman, Montreal. 
Maxwell, D., A Sons, St. Mary's, Ont. 
Taylor, Forbes Oo.. Guelph. 

Lawn Mower Grinders 

Root Bros. A Co., Plymouth, Ohio. 

Ledgers — Loose Leaf. 

business Systems, Toronto. 
Oopeland-Chatterson Oo, Toronto. 
Crain, Rolla L. , Co.. Ottawa. 
Universal Systems, Toronto. 

Lithographing. 

London Printing A Lithographing Co., 
London, Ont. 

Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Oo., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
National Hardware Co., Orillia, Ont. 

Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Pink, Thos , A Co., Pembroke Ont. 

Lye 

Gillett, E. W.. A Co.. Toron 



66 



HARDWARE AND MET A L 



Manufacturers' Agents. 

Fox.O. H, Vancouver. 

Mcintosh, U, P., Jt 00 . Toronto. 

Uibb, Alexande-, Montre d. 
Sor.tt, Bathuate A Oo , Winnipeg. 

Metals. 
Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, ' •■>' 
Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Eadie. II <«., Montreal 
Prothingham 4 Workman Montreal. 
Uibb, Alexander Montreal. 
Kemp Mfg Co.. Tor into 
Lealie, A. C, & Co., Montreal. 
Lysaght, John, Bristol, Kng. 
Nova Srotia Steel and Coal Co., N*w 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Roberta ,n. Jas . Co , Moutreal 
Koper, J. H., Montreal. 
Samuel, Benjamin & Co., Toronto 
Stairs, Son S Morrow, Halifax. N.S. 
Thompson. K. it S. H. 4 Co. Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

(Jalt Art Metal Co., Gait. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Metal Shingle & Siding Co., l'reston, 
Ont. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc 

Oakey, John, & Sons, London, Rug. 

Nails Wire 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 

Oil Tanks . 

Bowser. S. F.. & Co., Toronto 

Ornamental Iron and Wire. 

Dann s Wire 4 Iron Co , London, Out 
Packing. 

(iutta Han ha * Rubber Co Toronto 

faints. Oils, Varnishes, Glass 
Blanohlte Process Pain' Co., Toronto. 

Hran.l rum-Henderson, Montreal 
Canada Haint Co.. Montreal, 
Canadian Oil Co. Toronto 
Consolidated Plate Class Co., Toionto. 
Dots. '". D. 4 Co.. Montreal 
Imperial Varnish and Color Uo.,Toronio 
Jamiesnn. R. C. 4 Co.. Montreal. 
Lucaa John * Co.. New York 
McArthur, Conieille 4 Co., Montreal 
McCaBkill. Dougall 4 Co. Montreal. 
Moore. Benjamin. 4 Co. Toronto. 
Ottawa Paint Wor.i. Ottawa 
yueen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay 4 Son. Moutreal 
Sanderson earey 4 Co.. Toionto 
Sherwin-Williams Co.. Montreal. 
S'andard Paint Co., Montreal 
Standard Paint and Varnish Work? 

Windsor, Ont. 
Stephens 4 Co , Winnipeg. 
Martin-Senour Co.. Montreal 
Winnipeg Haint 4 Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Perforated Sheet Metals 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 



Plumbers' Tools mid Supplies 
Canadian Fairbanks Co.. ttontraaL 

1 'lufT, R. J,, 4 Co. Torou-o 
Frothingliam 4 Workman, Mont] kl 
Glauber Brass Co., Cleveland, Ohio 
Jardine, A. B. . 4 Co , Hoaiiel^r, on. 
JenkinB Bros . Boston. M isi 
Kerr Engine Co , Walkervillc, Out 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Sou, Toronto. 
M.-rrell Mfg Co. Toledo. Ohio. 
Mi ntreal Rolling Mills Montreal. 
Morrison, .las., Brass ttfg. Oo , Toronto. 
Mueller, II , Mfg Co., Decatur, III 
Oshawa Steam 4 Gas Fitting Co..Oshaw 
Robertson Jai., Oo. Mnitr-'ai 
Robertson, Jas,, Oo., Limited, Toronto 

Soiiu-rville, Liiuili'd, Toronto 

Stairs, Sou 4 Morrow, Halifax, N.S 

Standard Ideal Sauitary Co., Hurt Hope, 

Standard Sanitary Co., Rittsburg. 

Stepheus, G F.,4Co.. Winnipeg, Man 

Turner Brass Works, Chi ago. 

Vlnkery, Orlando, Toronto. 
Polishes. 

Majestic Polishes, Toronto 
>''Tt.lund Cement 

International Portland Cement Co 
Ottawa, Ont 

Hanover Portland Oeniunt Co., Han 
over, Ont. 

Hyde. K., 4 Co., Montreal 

Thompson B. * S. H. * Co , Montreal 

Poultry Netting 

(>T«-rnuK, B.. Wire Co., Hamilton, i Hit. 

Printing. 

London Printing 4 Lithographing Co.. 
London, Ont. 

Razors. 

Clauss Shear Co.. Toronto. 

Refrigerators 

Fahien, C. P., Montreal 

R< gisters 

Pease Foundry Co.. Toronto. 

Rooting Supplies 

Brantford Rooting Co Brantford. 
Barrett Mfg. Co., New York. 
F. W. Bird, East Walpole, IV' ass. 
Buchanan Fester Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
M rt 'thnr. Alex , iS Co., Mm,i >•->• 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co., Preston. Om 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto 
Pater'on Mfg Co., Toronto & Mont eal. 
Wheeler and Bain, Toronto 
Saws 
Atkins, E. O, 4 Co., Indianapolis, Inrl 
Shurly 4 Dietrich, Gait, Ont 
Spear 4 Jackson. Sheffield, Bug. 

Scales 

Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham 4 Workman. Montreal. 

Screw Cabinets, 

Cameron 4 Campbell, loronto. 



Screws, Nuts, Holts. 

Il .iiiini. ii \\ | M mi' real. 

tfjntreal Boiling Milts Oo., Montreal. 
So/7 Pipe 

d.l-'iirlaliii, V tiller. Clasgow 

Sewer Pipes 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Ilannlloi- 
Hydn. F.. 4 Oo., Montreal 

Shelf Boxes. 

Cameron A Campbell, Toronto 

Shears, Scissors. 

Claims Shear Co., Toronto 

Shovels ;iiid Spades 

l lip i Mi; Oo., Ottawa 
Protbingham ,v workman, Montreal. 
I' i i boro Shovel 4 Tool Co., !'■ ■ ■ 

Silverware. 

linn ■>■., Wm , 4 Sons. Ltd, London, 

Eng 
McUlaahan. Clarke Oo., Niagara Fal s. 

Out. 
Phillips, Coo., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Round, John, 4 Son, Sheffield, Kng. 

Skates. 

Canada Cycle 4 Motor Co., Toronto. 
\l I'ai'liine, Walter, Glasgow. 

Sprayers 

( lavers Bros., Gait 

Spring Hinges, etc. 

Chicago Spring Butt Co , Ohicago, III. 

Stable Fittings 

Dennis Wire & Iron Co., London 

Steel Rails 

Nova Scotia Steel 4 Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stove Pipe. 

Chowa, Edwin an 1 Sou, Kingston 

Stoves, Tinware, Furnaces 

Canadian Heating 4 Ventilating Oo. 

Owen Sound. 
Coup, W. J„ Son 4 Co., Fort William 
Davidson, Thus., Mfg. Co.. Montreal 
Down Draft Furnace Co., Gait 
Guelph Stove Co., Guelph. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Torouto. 
Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Howard Wm., Toronto 
Kemp Mnfg. Co. Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co. London. 
Merrick Anderson, Winniieg 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Smart. James, Mfg. Co. Broekvi.le 
Stewart, Jas., Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Out. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph. Ont. 
Wright, E. T.,4 Co., Hamilton. 



Tacks. 

Montreal Boiling Mill- Co . Mot 
Ontario Tack Co , Hamilton, 

Tents. 

Toiiin Tr nt and Awning ' i , Ottawa 
Tin Plate. 

American Mi ■ I .-. Tin Piute Co , Pills- 
burg. Pa 

I: .ii-l. in Baj Tin Plat) Oo., Briton Pi n> 
nmii h Wales 

Ly aght, John, Bristol, NewpO't and 
Montreal 

Turpentine 

Delian. e Mi ' I into 

Ventilators. 

Harris, I W„Oo, Montreal. 
!'• irson, Geo. D., Montreal. 

Wall Paper 

Staunton Limited Toronto. 

Wall Paper Cleaner. 
Gilbert, Fran] ..dand 

Washine Machines, etc 

Dowswell Mfg. Co . Hamilton, Out. 
TheSbultz Pros Co, Brantford 
Taylor Forhea Co., Guelph, Out. 

Water Filters. 

Buffalo Mfg Oo , Buffalo, N.Y. 

Wheelbarrows 

London Foundry Co., London Ont 
Scbultz Bros. Co., Ltd., The B rantford. 

Wholesale Hardware 

Birkett. Thos., * Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Caverhill. Learinont & Co., Montreal. 
Knit huik-haiii 4 Workman, Montreal. 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London 
Howland, H " Sons A Co.. Tnron'o. 
Lamplough, F. W. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros. 4 Co., M ont real. 
I*wis. Rice. * Son. Toronto 

Window and Sidewalk Prinmn 

Hobbs Mfg Oo.. London, Ont. 

Wire, Wire Roue. Cow Ties, 
Fencine Tonte etc 

Banwell-Hoxie Fence Co., Hamilton 
Dennis Wire and Iron Oo., Loudon. Ont. 
Dominion Wire Muf-. Co.. Montreal 
Greening, B.. Wire Co. Hamilton. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Jwen 

Sound 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Western Wire* Nail Co., London, Out. 
Wrapping Pnnero 

■Voida Paper Oo., Toronto. 
McArthur, Ale*.. 4 Co , Montreal. 
J.*ir« «l„n * Morrow. Halifax. U.K. 

Wringers 

Connor. J. H.ftSo-u. O awa. Out 



Wrought Iron Pipe and Cast Iro n Fittings 

Our .Stock in these lines is complete. 
Can fill all orders promptly. Be sup- 
plied before the Spring rush commences. 



WM. STAIRS, SON & MORROW, Limited, HALIFAX, N.S. 



WELL KNOWN BRANDS MADE IN CANADA E 

AMERICAN j ^^ /T^N. X / GLOI 

ARCADE /i X // // ^VsC^ EAGLE 



KEARNEY and 
FOOT 

NcCLELLAN 




GREAT 
WESTERN 

J. B. SMITH 



Dominion Works, Port Hope, On*. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"Seeing is Believing" 

CJ As the Ross Sporting Rifle represents the best in modern 
rifle manufacture, the highest grade materials and minute 
accuracy in workmanship, it is to your interest to learn fully 
about this Canadian Rifle — 

ffl The Ross Straight Pull 3o3 Sporting Model M is one of 
our leaders to retail at $26. The barrel is the celebrated 
Ross high pressure, non-fouling, gun-barrel steel — The 
breech action is dependable. 

Our representatives are now demonstrating the merits 
of this rifle — It places you under no obligation to drop 
us a line to make sure you will be on their calling list. 



Our advertising policy is co-operative. 



THE ROSS RIFLE CO., 



Q UEBEC 



THE SUMMER. COTTAGES 

need something to supersede the old-fashioned 
way of drawing water. 



OUR. 
GILT 
EDGE 
PUMPS 



are built for the purpose and a few words will con- 
vince you that they would be a good thing to have 
in stock. The real article will sell itself. We 
have others, of course, and all through it is Quality 
first. 

McDOUCALL PUMPS ARE STANDARD 

THE 

R. McDOUCALL CO., Ltd. 





6ALT, CANADA 



WORKS ALL THE TIME 



Some ventilators will work only in a 
storm. That spoils their effectiveness 

AEOLIAN VENTILATORS 



are so skilfully constructed and so 
nicely balanced that they are driven, 
not only by the slightest current of air, 
but by the difference in temperature, 
within and outside the building. 



Montreal, June 1st, 1903, 
St. Peter School. 
Messrs. The J. W. Harris Co., Limited. 
Dear Sirs, 
Iq answer to yours of 3rd inst. in 
connection with your system of ventila- 
tion which you have placed in the 
Brothers' House, in the School, etc., I 
beg to state that we are getting the 
greatest satisfaction we may desire. 

Brother Jordanus, Dir. 

MANUFACTURED BY 




™ J. W. HARRIS CO, LIMITED 
CONTRACTORS, MONTREAL 



68 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ROBERTSON'S 
SOLDERS 

Bar-King, Strictly Merchant's, 
Wire (any gauge) Tri- 
angular, Oval, Plumbers' 
and Canners' Solders, 
Electricians' Solder 

ARE STANDARD 



Ask Quotations 



The 



James Robertson Co. 



Limited 



144 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 



qHlftAGO 

5PRIng\w/buTTS 

A PRODUCT OF RECOGNIZED SUPERIORITY 

CHICAdO SPRINQ BUTT 

_1_ 



p. 
@ 



i 




1/ 



'/ 




TRIPLE-END SPRINQ BUTT 




"^-1B 




CHICAdO BALL-BEARINO 
FLOOR HINQE 



(Tbicaafo Spring 'But! (Tompatjg 

CHICAGO NEW YORK 

CATALOGUES ON REQUEST 





(JFJC/M MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc 

ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPE8 IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 



Canadian Factory 

London Office and Warahom o 24 tad 26 Hditra- 



Windsor, Ontario 

New York City Branch - 2 



For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 






II \RDWARE 



Bat. 1868 




Ido 189S. 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




AND METAL 



Awarded 
By JURORS at 

international Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



Copy of cata- 
logue sent free 
to any inter- 
ested file user 
upon applica- 
tion. 




Pid Iron 



Jarrow Brand 

Clarence 

Lackenby 

Cleveland 

Gartsherrie 

Carnbroe 

Glengarnock 

ETC. 



If you are in the market, send us particulars 
of your requirements, and we shall be glad to 
quote you favourable prices. 

B. &S.H. THOMPSON & CO. 



LIMITED 



381 and 383 St. Paul Street 
MONTREAL 



JJ 



Redstone 

High Pressure 

Sheet Packing 



A packing that will hold. For use in highest 
pressures for steam, hot or cold water and air. 
Packs equally well for all. 

From actual tests, we believe that this pack- 
ing is the most durable and satisfactory of any on 
the market. Try a sample lot and see for yourself. 

Manufactured Solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

of TORONTO, LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES, 

47 Yonge Street, Toronto. 

Branches : Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 




/"\| ID " \A/AMT APiQ " £ et clerks for employers and 
V^Un YYMIN I r\LJ\D.. fmd employers for clerks. 

HARDWAKE-METAL 

A Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 

Office of Publication, 10 Front Street East, Toronto. 



VOL. XIX. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, AUGUST 17, 1907 



NO 33. 



Forty Years of Steady Success 

for 

"Queen's Head" 

Not yet equalled in Quality. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, 
Bristol, Newport and Montreal 



A.C. LESLIE & CO. Ltd, MONTREAL 
Managers, Canadian Branch. 




CARVERS 

CASED GOODS 
TABLE CUTLERY 



BUTCHERS , 
HUNTING S. 
POCKET KNIVES 



For Sale by Leading Wholesale Houses. 




" Sovereign" Boilers Have Made 
Money For Scores of Dealers 

Have you received your share ? That for you is 
the main point, The economic devices and varied 
perfections of the "Sovereign" Boilers are readily 
realized and appreciated by all practical men. 
But — some dealers have not realized that every 
word of recommendation spoken for the 
"Sovereign' - is the surest way of toning up their 
bank accounts. Let us mail you some interesting 
facts about ''Sovereign - ' Boilers. 

Taylor- Forbes Company, 



LIMITED 



Head Office and Works: OUELPH, ONT. 

TORONTO-1088 King: St. Wtst. MONTREAL— 122 Craig: St. West 

WINNIPEG— The Vulcan Inn Works, Limited 



Read "Want Ads." on Page 51 



11 A R 1) W A K !'. A \ I) M ET A I. 




QEn FOOD 
CHOPPER 



A modern household utensil that is needed 
in every kitchen. Carefully made, nicely 
tinned, self-cleaning, self-sharpening. It has 
steel cutters, and is made in four sizes. 




No. 16 capacity I lb. per minute 
No. 20 " 2 lbs. 
No. 22 " 2h lbs. 
No. 24 " 3 lbs. 



ic 



(i 



<( 



Gem Food Choppers chop all 
kinds of Raw or Cooked Meat, 
Fish, Clams, Oysters, Vege- 
tables of all kinds. Fruit, Bread, 
Crackers or Cheese, and many 
other articles used in making 
substantial dishes and dainty 
desserts. It is more useful than 
a chopping bowl and a great 
deal handier. It may be easily 
clamped to the kitchen table 
and is ready for use whenever 
needed. 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



UNITED 



TORONTO. 



II \ K O VV A R E A N I) M KTAL 



Specify the Following Products 

Manufactured by 

American Sheet and Tin Plate Company 



PITTSBURG, PA. 

If you want the best. 



"Apollo Best Bloom," Galvanized Sheets, 

Blue Annealed and American Bessemer 

Black Sheets, 

Wellsville Polish, Range Steel, 

Wood's "A" Planished Iron, 

Black Steel specialties for all purposes, 

Tinplates, Coke and Charcoal, all grades, 

Terne Plates, Old Style and New 

Method Processes. 



Place your order with 

B.&S.H.TH0MPS0N& CO. 

LIMITED 

Dominion of Canada Sales Agents 
MONTREAL, CANADA 



QH1@A§p 

SPRINg^*/bUTT5 

A PRODUCT OF RECOGNIZED SUPERIORITY 

CHICAQO SPRINQ BUTT 



k 



Lrf-ii 



w 

b 



TRIPLE-END SPRINO BUTT 



T 



•ff 




t 






CHICAGO BALL-BEARINa 
FLOOR HINOE 



djicagoSprtug^SuIi Compaq 

CHICAGO NEW YORK 

CATALOGUES ON REQUEST 



Other Tools are very " \X A M ^ ET IT T C\ C\\ C M are 

Good Tools, but TMINIxtt UULO better 

SCREW DRIVERS es«^ The NEWEST, CLEVEREST and QUICKEST SELLING TOOLS 

of the KIND. 

DRILLS 
No. 10 * II— RATCHET, right and left hand and rigid. 






No. 40— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with Ratchet Movement. 



No. 30— SPIRAL RATCHET- -right and left hand and rigid. 
No. 31— '• " (heavy pattern) 

No. 10— . " " right hand only. 



Chuck and 8 Drill Point* 

for iplral ratchet 
•crew driver. 



Countersink, 

for spiral ratchet 
icrew driver. 




m No. 12-RATCHEl, 

with Btnb blade 



■w^ 



:-&ȣ- 



i«aJ — - 




No. 44— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with adjustable tension on spring. 





No. 60 POCKET 
SCREW DRIVER. 



No SO-RECIPROCATING DRILL, for wood or metals 

SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 
SEND FOR OUR NEW "YANKEE" TOOL BOOK 

NORTH BROS. MFG. GO. 

PHILADELPHIA, Re.. 



/ 



II \ R n\v \ R E \ N n MF.TAI. 




Dirvlr^C MA0E IN CANADA 

Lumbering 
Tools 



Send for Catalogue 
and Prioe List 



THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 
Zealand, Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of Lumbar Tools 

Pink's Patent Open Socket Peaveys. 
Pink's Patent Open Socket Cant Dogs. 
Pink's Patent Clasp Cant Dogs, all Handled 
with Split Rook Maple. 

These aro light and durable tools. 

Sold throughout the Dominion 
by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Long Distance 
Phone No. S7 



THOMAS PINK 
Pembroke, Ont., Canada. 



Pig Iron 



"JARROW" and "GLENGARNOGK." 



Agents fOr Canada, 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co 



TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



D 



Disston's Plumbs and Levels 
for Profit 



Easy to Sell 

They're Known so 

Well 



I 



Sizes 



Sizes 



1 2 x 1 Va 
1 4 x 1 Vi 
1 6 x 1 y 2 




-.-if! 



18x2 
24x2 



No. 757 — Best boxwood, brass ends, brass spirit compartment, graduate sides 





No. 121 A G — Antique oak, assorted, 18 to 30 inches, brass arch top plate 




T 




N 



I 






No. 24 — Patent adjustable plumb and lever, arch top plate, improved side views, solid 
brass ends and polished, assorted, 26 to 30 inches 




No. 16 — Patent adjustable arch top plate, two side views, tipped and polished, 

26 to 30, assorted 




No. 9 D— Plain plumb and level, 24 x 30 inches, assorted, arch top plate, two side views, polished. 
No. 09— Same as above, only 18 to 24 inches, assorted 



No. 100— Plain level, length 12 inches, solid hardwood, 
stained and polished, with nickel top plate. 



If you want the Best in 
Plumbs and Levels, at 
moderate prices, specify 
Disston's, and tell us the 
number you require. 



And »t 

OTTAWA 



LEWIS BROS., Limited 

Wholesale Hardware 
MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



CALOARY 



VANCOUVER 



II \ R H\V A R !■ \ N I) METAL 



- Hits the Mark 



Among ilie thousands of readers 
of Hardware and Metal it seems 
reasonable ihat someone wants what 
you have to sell, or that someone lias 
to sell what you have tried in vain to 
buy, that someone is hunting the 
opportunity you have to offer. 

The want ad. columns of Hard- 
ware and Metal are the simplest form 
of simplified advertising. No ad. 
writer need he employed, no drawing or cut need 
he made, no knowledge of display type is necessary, 
for display type will not be used in these columns. 
All that you have to do is state your wants, state 
them simply and clearly and send to any of our offices 
along with remittance to cover cost of advertisement. 
No accounts opened in this department. 

Don't despise the want ad. because of its small size 
or small cost. Don't forget that practically all the 
hardware merchants, clerks, manufacturers and 
travellers read our paper each week. 

RATES:— 

2c. per word first insertion, 
lc. per word subsequent insertions. 
:>c. additional each insertion for box number. 





A Food Chopper to be of any use to you must 
sell. A1 choppers not only sell, but they leave you a 
satisfactory profit and please >our customers. 

A1 choppers are made in four sizes, in all of 
which the base plate is removable and reversible, 
allowing the body to be thoroughly cleansed with 
least trouble. 

Each chopper is supplied with four cutting plates, 
which are made from best quality steel and will keep 
sharp for years. 

Write for further particulars. 

F. W. Lamplough ®> Co. 

MONTREAL 




Davidson's 
"Empire" Stove Pipe 

Improved Patent 

Neatly packed in crates of 25. 
Secures lowest possible freight rate. 

Deep Swage Prevents Telescoping. 
Coated to Prevent Rust. 

Sold as low as ordinary Stove Pipes. 



SIMPLE and EASY to put together. 
No Profane Language Necessary. 
The only tools required are a pair of hands. 
Pipes being cut out with dies ensure abso- 
lute fit and conformity. 




Patented 1900. Improved 1905. 




Wash Tubs— Galvanized 

With Wringer Attachment 



Miners' Camp Kettles 

Strong and substantially made in 
extra heavy tin. 

Nineteen sizes, from Vs quart to 29 quarts. 




Nos. 

Top measurement, inches 
Bottom " " 

Height 



1 2 3 

2lV 3 22% 25 

1 7% I8V4 20 

91/2 1 OV 2 11 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Ltd., 



Montreal and 

Winnipeg 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



Only 
Wholesale 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 
138-140 WEST KRONT STREET, TORONTO. 



LIMITED 



Wholesale 
Only 




" Dominion " Loadetl Shells 

Black and Smokeless Powder 

For other lines of Ammunition see our Catalogue 



Eley's Loaded Shells 

Black andlSmokeless Powder. 



Our Prices are Right 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 

Opposite Union Station 

QRAHAM WIRE NAILS ARE THE BEST 

Are you receiving our monthly illustrated circular? IF NOT WRITE FOR IT. 



LIMITED 



We Ship Promptly 



H\ ROW A RE AND METAL 



GARNET PAPER 

Should be tough, pliable and not liable to crack. 



i 




H. Bartons Best American have these" 
qualities. It is used by the largest manu- 
facturing concerns and car shops in Canada 
in preference to any other. You should 
earn- it in stock. 

Cuts faster than sand paper. 



In Sheets, 9x11 inches. 

IN ROLLS 

24, 30, 36, 40, 42, 46 

INCHES. 




Garnet 
Cloth 

In Rolls, 14-inch. 








SAND PAPER 

Star, in sheets, 8'i x 10^-inch. 

Baeder & Adamson, in sheets, x 11-inch 

Baeder & Adamson, in Rolls, 

24, 30, 36, 40, 42, 48-in. 

EMERY CLOTH 

Atlas, Improved, in sheets, 8| x ll£-in. 
Baeder & Adamson, in sheets. '•' x 11-in. 



I 

! 







WE HAVE A COMPLETE STOCK OF THE ABOVE. 

ASK OUR TRAVELLERS TO QUOTE, OR WRITE US. 



I 



F.fcW. 



Hardware 
Montreal 



FROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN, Limited 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




Style of No. 9%, 15, 16 and 17 adjustable 
block planes. 




Style of No. 9% and 15% adjustable 
planes with rosewood handle. 



block 




Style of wood bottom jack, fore and jointer 
planes. 



Stanley Tools are Standard 

They mark the high- 
est perfection in work- 
manship, igenuity of 
design and adaptability. 

They <ire the tools 
competitors i m i t a t e. 
They know it is useless 
to endeavor to originate 
anything better. 

Stanley tools are 
the results of many 
years of study, test- 
ing and improve- 
ment. 

It pays to handle 
the best. Your store 
is known by the 
quality of its goods. 
A reputation for 
handling cheap sub- 
stitutes for the 
genuine article will 
bring the trade of 
those who HAGGLE 
over prices instead of 
studying the merits 
of the goods they 
buy. 

You don't want 
that kind of busi- 
ness. 

Build up your re- 
putation. 

Sell good tools, 
and those are 
STANLEY. 




No. 20 adjustable circular plane, 
plated. 



Full nickel 




Style of "Bed Rock' jack, fore and jointer 
planes. The highest perfection in the art of 
plane making 




Style of 'Bailey" jack, fore and jointer planes. 
Plain or corrugated bottoms. 



MONTREAL 

Winnipeg, Ottawa, Quebec, Fraserville 



II \ K DWA R E AN D M ETAL 



Canada Leads the World in the Manufacture of 

HIGH-CLASS SAWS 




No. 81 



The best and cheapest Hand Saw on the market, quality, temper and finish considered. 
Every saw warranted. Carved applewood handle. Patented, wave finish blade. 




sHUf^PJ&'raicH 

> RAZOR STEEL 

i $100 FORONECUT. 

$500 DAYSNMORK 4 

$1000 , „ WEEKS. I 



& 



jjfe) 




No. 1 Maple Leaf Lance Tooth Cross-Cut Saw, and the No. Racer are tempered under 
our secret process. 



&WM 




No. Narrow Racer Cross-Cut Saw 




If you want saws that will sell and give your customer satisfaction, you will stock 
the Maple Leaf Saws. 



Mtt n u f ao tu rod 
by 



SHURLY & DIETRICH, 



GALT, Ontario 



HAH DWA R E A ND META I. 



Simonds 
Crescent-Ground Gross-Cut Saws 



■£? 




For logging camps where work must be fast and economical there is no other saw made that can 
give results equal to the Crescent-Ground Saw. Made of Simonds 8teel. It cuts easy, runs fast 
and gives good results. This cross-cut saw is sold by most of the leading jobbers in Canada. 

Simonds Canada Saw Co., Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



ST. JOHN. N.B. 




PRATT AND WHITNEY MILLING CUTTERS 

are made in any size and shape. The standard for accuracy, uniform 
in temper, and of the best steel. 

TAPS, DIES, REAMERS, DRILLS, PUNCHES, GAUGES 

PRATT AND WHITNEY SMALL TOOLS 

Arrangements made with dealers to carry stock. 

THE CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO., Limited, 



MONTREAL 



CANADIAN SALES AGENTS, 
TORONTO - WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 




Wheelbarrows 



All kinds and sizes. The cut repro- 
duced here is just of one of the many, 
but the kind every contractor should 
use. The substantial, satisfactory, 
steel tray Contractor's Harrow. 



The London Foundry Co. 



LONDON, CAN. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PURITAN 

REACTING a^^ji) 

WASHING 

MACHINE 




ROLLER 1 RUNS ^ 
BEARIN6 V J EASY. 



THREE PROFIT PULLERS ! 



MAXWELL LAWN MOWER 

The bes( for 

Durability, 

Finish 

and 

Efficiency. 




David Maxwell & Sons, St. Mary's, Ont 




STYLE F. 



THE 



LEADER 



A Name Familiar to Butter Maker* in Connection with the 

Highest Grade Churns 



ITS STRONG POINTS: 

Stiff Steel Frame, with malleable iron fittings, Combination Bow 
Lever and Pedal Drive. Bicycle Ball Bearings. Bolted Trun- 
Dions. Cream Breakers. Barrel easily drained and conveniently 
detatchable for cleaning. 
Dealers : When you handle this line you handle QUALITY. 

The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., Limited 



W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal 

EASTERN AGENTS 



HAMILTON 

ONTARIO 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK f ^ C es 



FOR FASTEdINO WOODEN PICKET ON WIRE 




THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO.. Limited, 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE STAPLES, etc. 



-LONDON, ONT 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

ft*ttltf»— ^■^^^STHMid^Electrie Power] 

ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machine.. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOB C*T«LO«II« TO 
IwritU Skwtr Htf . U, lutu, I.H-EM 

Weibusch k Hilger, Limited special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 





The Peterborough Lock Manufacturing Company, Limited 




Cyllnd.r Might La oh, No. 101. 




Peterborough, Ont. 

Manufacturer* of all kinds 

Rim and Mortise Locks, 
Inside, Front Door, and 
Store Door Sets, also full 
line High-class Builders' 
Hardware. 

Sold by all Loading Jobhorm 
In the Dominion. 



IO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Consumers Cordage Co., 

Manufacture every variety of 

BINDER TWINE 



LIMITED 



CORDAQE 



PACKINU 



LATHYARN 



SMALL TWINES 



From Manilla, Sisal, Italian, Russian, Jute 

Tallow Laid Transmission Rope, 3 or 4" Strand 

Oil Well Drilling Cables, Lariat Hope, 3 or 4 Strand, 

Halyards, Deep Sea Line, Snap Halters, Snap Plow Lines, 

Clothes Lines, Hide Cord, Pulp and Paper Cord, 

Tarred Rope, Marline, Houseline 

Wrapping, Rolling, Seaming, Sewing and Grape Twines 

Careful Execution SPECIAL ORDERS Prompt Shipment 

Mills: riONTREAL, QUE., and HALIFAX, N.S. 



BRANCHES: 



F. H. ANDREW8 & 80N, Quebec. CONSUMERS CORDAQE CO.. Limited, 8t. John, N.B. MacGOWAN & CO., Vancouver 

TEES &. PEftSSE, Limited, Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton. QEO. WOOD, London, England. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg, Binder Twine Distributors for Northwest. 



»♦»»»»♦»»♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦< 



ro*»r»T QUALITY 




IN 



ENAMELLED and GALVANIZED 



WARE 

Buy goods 
manufactured by 

Ontario Steel Ware, Limited 




115-121 Brock Avo. and -79-31 Floi 

TORONTO. ONT. 



rice St. 



it 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



At kin's 

Silver Steel Saws 



Are just as good as they 
took to be 




Finest material, Finest workmanship 
Finest finish 

MAKE FRIENDS AND MONEY FOR THE DEALER 

£- C. A TKINS & CO., Inc. 

The Silver Steel Saw People, 

Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Canadian Branch— No. 77 Adelaide St., E., Toronto 



The Long and the Short of It 



IT" MEANS 




THE "LONG" 

is the time it wears. It stands the test of heat 
and frost, wind and rain, and gives your cus- 
tomers nianv years of solid satisfaction. 

THE "SHORT" 

part is the time needed to put it on. A great 
deal of time — which means a great deal of 
money — is saved to the man who uses 

SHIELD BRAND 
READY ROOFING 



LOCKERB Y (8b McCOMB 

e>3 SHANNON STREET 

MONTREAL 



Proper Heating Essential 

Tensile strength, great durability and facility in welding depend on 
the treatment of the metal in the furnace. 

Only experts handle the iron in the London Mills' Furnaces. This 
■ the secret of the regularity of its good quality. 

A trial order will make you a regular customer. ° 



London Rolling Mills 





When in the 
market f o r 
GANG CHEESE 
PRESSES and 
up - to - date 
CURD CUTTERS 
lust sit 
down and 

write to JAMES & REID, Perth, Ont. For 
FARMER'S FEED COOKERS write JAMES BROS. 
FOUNDRY CO., Perth, Ont. 



The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO 

— Manufacturers of the celebrated — 

"Saugoon Brand" 

OF PORTLAND CEMENT 

Prices on application. Prompt shipment 



WORK AND 

PRICES 

RIGHT 



ENGINE 8. PUMP CO. 

TORONTO. ONT. - lM -; - : 



Don't Forget the Name . . . 

NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective, 

Will close a door against any pressure of wind. 
Far ahead of ordinary door srrings, pneumatic 
or otherwise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SOBS Birmingham. 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their adver- 
tisement in this paper. 



12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



^ 



Our Monogram is Your Protection 

Send us your orders for 

Cutlery, Electro Plate and 
Solid Nickel Silver Flatware 

and we guarantee to fill them quickly and satisfactorily. Our 
goods have a distinguishing quality and finish which pull 
business. 

The McGlashan, Clarke Co., Limited 

NIAGARA FALLS, - ONT. 

MR. J. MACKAY ROSE, 117 You»llle Square, Montreal, Qui. MR. I, F. GUNOY, 47 Hdyter St., Toronto, Onl 

MR. DAVID PHILIP. 291 Portage Ave., Winnipeg, Man. 





FACTS 



about the best 

CONE ROTARY VENTILATOR 

on the market 



Can. Feb. 27, 1889 



Known everywhere as PEARSON'S 

This ventilator is set in motion by the least current of air and will give a perfect 
draught at all times. 

Substantial in make. Ornamental in appearance. 

For balky chimneys and ventilating Churches, Schools, Halls, Factories, Steamers, 
Public and Private Buildings, Stables, Water Closets, &c. 

This Ventilator is in use throughout the Dominion, and has proved a great success. 
Remember every Ventilator is guaranteed to work satisfactorily. 
They are made in sizes from 2J2 to 48 inches. 

All orders by mail promptly attended to Testimonials on application. 
Write to-day for particulars to the owners : 
Clan T% P., rl ,nn XrC*f\ Office and Works: 17 Pontiac Street. MONTREAL 

UeO. V. rearSOn 06 \jO., BeM Telephone East 2106 



Salt Sure grip Shingle^ 

are simply wonders to sell, to lay and to make friends. Once used 
and you would never use any other — your customers wouldn't let you. 

"Sure-Grips" make a really handsome roof, as well as the most 
weatherproof. Try them — that's all we ask. 

"Galt" Corruoated Sheets are best English galvanized stock, pressed 
straight and true. Our prices are right, and we can ship promptly. 

Consult us before purchasing Ceilings, Sidings, Roofings, Cornices, 
Skylights, Ventilators, Finials, Fire-proof Windows, Expanded 
Metal Lath, etc. 

The "Galt Kind" is the line to push ; we protect 
and assist our customers. 



THE GALT ART METAL CO., Limited 

GALT, - ONT. 




THE WAGGONER EXTENSION LADDER 

is the lightest, handiest, 
strongest and safest 
ladder made. Re-in- 
forced with steel wire. 
Patent safety lock. 
Made in all lengths from 
20-ft., 24-ft., 28-ft., etc., 
up to 100 ft. if desired. 
Every painter, tinner, 
stacker and farmer 
needs one 

Write for circulars 
and prices. 

The Wagoner Ladder Co., Ltd. 

LONDON, m - CANADA 

E. H, BrlggtCo., Ltd.. Western Representative 
Winnipeg, Man 




Past Due Accounts. 

We have just issued an eight 
page booklet regarding our 
Collection Department. If you 
have not received one write us. 
It will interest you. 

The Beardwood Agency 

Claims, Collections and 
Commercial Reports 

313, New York Life Bldg., MONTREAL 



Jardine Hand Drills 

New Designs 

Get samples of these machines lor 
your show room. They will interest 
your customers and prove a good in- 
vestment. 

It pays to sell the best Tools. 



A. B. JARDINE ft CO. 



HESPELER 



ONTARIO 



..FULL STOCK.. 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
& Specialty. 

THE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 



TOROMTe. 0f" 



13 



J I \ R n\V \ R E AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED 1795 



JOHN SHAW & SONS 

WOLVERHAMPTON, Limited 



WOLVERHAMPTON 



Coil Chain 

Canada Plates 
Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Galvanized Sheets 
Bar Iron 

Lowest Prices for Import. 

J. H. ROPER 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE 

82 St. Francois Xavier Street, - MONTREAL 



WHAT'S THE PROFIT ? 



fib* 




You wouldn't be in the hardware business if you 
weren't interested in the profit question. That's 
why we ask you to write and ask us about the 

" Dillon " Hinge-Stay 
Field Fence 

which is the most durable, economioal and— above 
all— saleable fence on the market. 

THE OWEN SOUND WIRE FENCE CO., Limited 



OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

CnlH hu ' Me88, ' s> Caverhlll, Learmont & Co., Montreal 
uOlu DY Messrs. Christie Bros. Co., Limited, Winnipeg 
(The Abercromble Hardware Co., Vancouver 




BEAVER POST-HOLE DIGGER 

will please your customer. A pleased customer is an 

asset to any business. No wood to rot, check or break. 

Special Discounts to Trade 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 



LIMITED 



HEAO OFFICE and WORKS, TORONTO, ONT. 

Oistrlot Offices ; Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg 

Vanoouver, Rossland 




"KAMA" Rerd. LIQUID METAL POLISH 

BRITISH MANUFACTURE. 

Absolutely non-inflammable. Has no bad smell. 

Leaves no Verdigris. Contains no acid or grit. 

Leaves no greasy smear. KANDA polishes all metal. 

lv < rwrN1 -'- rv *=* **V/. f LONDON. ENGLAND 

SOLE AGENTS for Ontario: 

THE KENNEDY HARDWARE GO., Ltd. 

TORONTO 




If you have a sign over 
your door, you are an ad- 
vertiser. The sign is in- 
tended to advertise your 
business to passers-by. An 
advertisement in a reliable 
Trade paper is only so 
many thousand signs 
spread over a great many 
square miles. 

You can't carry every- 
body to your sign, but 

HARDWARE and METAL 

can carry your sign to 
everybody. 






14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



There's a Profit Story Here ! 

Most shrewd dealers know it. ])o you? It's 
an easily proven fact that our Pood Choppers 
are the best by actual test — on the Canadian 
market. Before placing your orders for 

FOOD CHOPPERS 




you should have our price list and ask for 
proofs of our claims. We give a money- 
back guarantee with every machine. All 
parts are tinned and 
interchangeable, and 

these Choppers have 
Steel Knives. 




BUY IN CANADA 



BUY THE BEST 



Shirreff Mfg. Co., Ltd., - Brockville, Ont 



A RECORD BREAKING SELLER 



22 CALIBRE 
16 SHOT 




*m~ 



=£s 



HOPKINS & ALLEN'S 



MILITARY BOLT ACTION REPEATINC RIFLE 



7/^ There has long been a demand for a good rifle at this price— and the 

HOPKINS & ALLEN Junior Repeater fills the bill. This rifle has been and 

LIST is being extensively advertised, and a heavy sale for it is created. 

SPECIFICATIONS :— 22-inch barrel, take-down, 22 calibre. Magazine handles 22 short, 22 long and 22 
long rifle cartridges without change of carrier. Shoots 16-22 short or 12-22 long or long rifle cartridges 
Action, Militaty Bolt Pattern with positive safety device. Length over all, 40 inches, weight SV 2 pounds. 



$ 



10 



FOR SALE BY ALL FIRE- 
ARMS JOBBERS. 




PLENTY OF GOOD SUPPLE- 
MENTARY ADVERTISING 
MATTER-FREE. 





WRITE FOR CATALOGS 



THE HOPKINS & ALLEN ARMS CO. 




LONDON OFFICE 



6 Olty Road, Flnebury Square, London UGpt. 67, NORWICH, CONN., U.S.A. 



Shows Boll Drawn Back — Position for Ejecting 
Shells. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MORE THAN A MILLION IN USE 

SOLD ON MERIT-NEVER ON BLUFF 

THE BIGGEST HEAT VALUE IN THE WORLD FOR THE MONEY 

Alumino and Electric 
Oil Heaters 

The only oil heaters which heat from the sides and bottom as well as from the top, there- 
fore the only oil heaters which can be satisfactory because they heat the entire room. 

No Smell, No Smoke, No Danger, No Trouble, 
A furnace for heat— No other Oil Heater on 
earth so good, so safe, so SATISFACTORY 

The only oil heaters equipped with our Grand Safety Burner 
which alone gives perfect combustion and therefore perfect safety 
with perfect heating qualities. 




NOTE 



A sale is made 
at soon as you 
showthisburner 
to the prospect- 
ive purchaser, 
and when you 
makeasalethere 
are no "after 
troubles." 




Sectional view showing construction 
grand "8afety Burner." 

A — Flame Spreader ; B — Air space outside 
of Wick ; C Air space inside of Wick 
Tube ; D — Wick ; E — Outside Casing to 
Burner ; F — Air space between Fount and 
Outside Casing ; C — Fount for oil, entirely 
separate from Burner ; H — Feed Pipe 
carrying oil trom Fount to Burner. 



NOTE 



Any child can 
operate and re- 
wick these heat- 
ers. It is never 
necessary to 
send a man out 
to rewick or 
keep them in 
running order. 




The Patent Wick Control makes it impossible for a careless 
operator to turn up too high or for smoke to be produced. 
The Solid Flame Spreader without perforations prevents clogging up, with the result of 
bad odors. 

The Workmanship and Finish are a delight to the eye, and the general utility of these 
heaters is beyond competition. 

These are the heaters which mean money for the dealer because by their 
strong practical merit they sell themselves— they stay sold, and every sale is a 
seller because it creates new customers. 

So far this year the demand is double that of last year. Get your orders to your jobbers 
early —now. Ask for a supply of our descriptive book, pass them out to your customers, every 
book sells a heater, and we supply the books to you without cost. Every one guaranteed and 
our guarantee is not a promise but a fact. It means money back if a heater should prove 
unsatisfactory. 



LEWIS BROS., Limited 



MONTREAL 
WINNIPEG 



TORONTO 
VANCOUVER 



OTTAWA 
CALGARY 



EMERSON & FISHER 



ST. JOHN, 



LIMITED 



N.B. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




WOULDN'T YOU RATHER SELL 

a register which will give your customer entire satisfaction ? The 

JONES SIDE-WALL REGISTER 

is the register that satisfies. It saves your customers money by 
reducing piping 50 per cent, on a heating system, and works to 
his entire satisfaction. 

The Jones Register Co. 

732 King St. West Toronto, Canada 



Wrought Steel Registers 



Standard Sizes, AH Finishes 
Perfect Operating Device 
Unusually Large Air Space 
For Sale by Leading Jobbers 



HART (EL COOLXY CO. 

New Britain, Conn., U.S.A. 




h. & c. No. too. 



FERROSTEEL REGISTERS 



The only house in the world manufacturing 



CAST IRON FLOOR 

SEMI STEEL FLOOR 

WROUGHT STEEL FLOOR 

CAST IRON SPECIAL SIDE WALL 

WROUGHT STEEL SPECIAL SIDE WALL 

FLAT OR CONVEX EXTRA SHALLOW SIDE WALLS 

DEFLECTORS, PANCAKES, WAFERS 



In all Designs and Finishes. 

Mechanism Perfect. 

Capacity Greatest. 

Finish Unsurpassed. 

No reputable line can undersell us. 



MHO ^^wi'W^^wi'wVa #M 

U: »>£«£•»:= 



MOORISH DESIGN 



FERROSTEEL COMPANY, 



CLEVELAND, OHIO 



M «• 




Brantford Roofin g 

We beg to announce to the Trade throughout 

Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia 

that our representative, MR. J. S. McGUIRL will call upon 
you shortly in the interest of 

Brantford Roofing Co., Brantford, Canada. 



17 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



A BRAND NEW ONE 

The WESTERN IDEA STEEL COOK 

THE LOW COST, ECONOMY and ATTRACTIVE APPEARANCE 
CANNOT FAIL TO INTEREST THE CLOSEST BUYER 

A Handsome, Medium Sized, Low Priced, Four Hole, Planished Steel Cook 

which has all the Features of a High Priced Stove, a Quick 

Baker with Economy in the Use of Fuel. 



ASBESTOS LINED 
PLAIN OR NICKEL 

DUPLEX GRATES 
LARGE ASH PAN 




FINISH 



SECTIONAL 

LONG CENTRE 

ALL STEEPLEHEAD 

RIVETS USED 



918. WESTERN IDEA, RESERVOIR, SILVER NICKEL FINISH 



THE DEALER CAN SELL AND RECOMMEND WITH CONFIDENCE THIS STOVE 
TO BE THE BEST IN ITS LINE MANUFACTURED IN CANADA 

GUELPH STOVE CO., LIMITED 

GUELPH, ONT. 



\ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




You May Be a Good Salesman 

But, is everything in your favor? Are you selling 
the new Imperial Oxford ? A continuous stream of 
repeat orders tells the story to us. 



Removable Nickel 
Removable Fire Linings 
An Oval Firebox 
The " Divided Draft" 



All contained by 
the best looking 
stove in the mar- 
ket. 



It gives a good salesman a chance to spread 
himself. 

Drop us a card, or, better still, tell us the size 
range you want on your floor. If you get this 
agency you're lucky. 

TKe Gurney Foundry Company, Limited 

Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver Hamilton and London 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO.. LIMITED. MONTREAL. Qui. 
THE GURNEY STANDARD METAL CO.. LIMITED. CALGARY, Alt... «nd EDMONTON. Alt.. 



Experienced dealers se/ect 
McClary's Stove- Piping and El- 
bows because, first, they sell, 
and second, it pays to sell them. 

"Easy Lock" Stove-Piping is made to meet 
the requirements for a non-telescoping, easy-fitting, long-lasting 
pipe that any dealer can conscientiously recommend and any 
consumer wisely buy. Nested 25 lengths in each crate. 

Th© McClary Elbow you see here is the acme of strength 
and neatness. The seam is grooved and riveted, which ensures firmness, 
which ensures a perfect fit. Bound or bevel. Crates of one dozen each. 



l 
I 



♦ 




Profit 



as fellow - dealers have 
Sell the McClary Line 



done : 



The McClary Mfg. Co. 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, ST. JOHN, N.B., 
♦ HAMILTON. CALOARY 

19 




\ R 1> \\ \ R E V.ND M ET \ I. 



Francis Hyde &Co, 

KING, QUEEN and WELLINGTON STS. 
MONTREAL 



To 

EVERY MAN 

who uses 

Fire Bricks 

We handle the best makes of Scotch 
Fire Bricks, and our prices are right, 
but there are occasions when you 
must have more refractory materials, 
and then please remember that we 
are the Canadian representatives of 
the 

"HARBISON WALKER REFRACTORIES" 
COMPANY 

and this should indicate that we are 
the Fire Brick House of Canada. 

Others ol our exclusive specialties 
are 

Lafarge 

Non-Staining Cement 

Iron Clad 

Portland Cement 

United Paving 
*•££«*• Bricks 
Enamelled Bricks 

All Colors 

Drain Pipes 
Plaster, etc. 



Smooth finish, perfect threads and first-class 
material, are the reasons why 

"Diamond" brand Fittings 

are in such constant demand. 
WHOLESALE ONLY 

OSHAWA STEAM & GAS FITTING CO., 

OSHAWA. CANADA 




LIMITED 



Don't Stop 




to ask your neighbor, lift 
the load yourself with 
The Burr Self-Locking 

Tackle Block. Saves the labor of two or three 

men. 600 to 5,000 pounds capacity. 



Lewi* Broi., Ltd., Montreal 
Munro Wire Works, Winnipeg 
Vokes Hardware Co., Toronto 
F. Hamilton & Co., Hamilton 
The Bnrr Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio 



DON'T TAKE CHANCES, BECAUSE IT 
DOESN'T PAY TO DO SO 

You can make any and all claims for Furnace Cement%if you have stocked with 

Sterne's Asbestos Stove and 
Furnace Cement 

because it is more durable, economical and has more heat-resisting power than 
any other Cement on the market. Every pound guaranteed. 

O. FV STERNE & SONS, 

BRANTFORD, - - ONTARIO 



Queen City Water White Oil 

GIVES PERFECT LIGHT 

The most economical high-grade oil ever sold in Canada. 

FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS 



m _ 





S/MONDS HAND SAWS 

are good sellers. Dealers should send for 1907 Catalogue and discounts. 

SIMONDS MANUFACTURING CO. 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

Branches Throughout The United States 



SIMONDS No. Sy 2 

This Saw is of the general style 
and shape which carpenters have 
been accustomed to using for years 
past. Has a carved apple handle 
with highly polished sides and edges, 
making a very pretty Saw. Holds its 
cutting edge and saws true. Its high 
quality and even temper are due to 
the fact that it is Made of Simonds 
8teel. Covered by the broadest 
Simonds warranty. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





"High Grade" 

ENGINEERS' SUPPLIES 

and STEAM SPECIALTIES 



The genuine 
Hancock Inspirator 

A double tube machine. 
It works perfectly under 
the greatest range of 
conditions. 



j.m.t Valve 
The Valve of quality ' 







Steam and Oil 

Separators, 

Exhauil Heads, 

etc. 



Bras* and Iron Cocks 

We make a large range of 
these goods. 

Standard Screwed and Flanged 

Extra heavy " 

"Marine" with gland " " 

Asbesus packed " 

J.M.T. Injector 

Simple and efficient boiler 
feeder 

Manufacturers of the largest variety in the Dominion 



TheJAS. MORRISON BRASS MFG CO., Limited 

93-97 Adelaide Street West 



A Better Metal Chain Guard 

Just as soon as the trade knew that we 
were ready to market our improved Meta' 
Chain Guard, our construction department 
was almost swamped with orders. 

Shrewd dealers recognized this Guard as 



an important constituent of The Wise Buyers' 
line. The big bicycle boom in Canada should 
mean lots to you. It will— if you secure our 
catalogue and stock our bicycle accessories. 



Forsyth Manufacturing Co. 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

W. F. Canavan, 13 St. John Street, Montreal, Representative 




iHMEflJ^ 



mUZr' HYDRANT MANUFACTURERS 

Walkerville, Ont. 
memmmmmmmmmmmmmm I 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Dealers in Plumbing Equipment have a Practical Guarantee 

of larger profits 
and greater satis- 
faction In handl- 
ing 

STANDARD IDEAL 
CAST IRON PORCE- 
' LAIN ENAMELED 
WARE. 

Made in Canada 
from designs cal- 
' culated to meet 
every require- 
ment of the trade, 
it is a ware that 
embodies in it- 
self the dura- 
bility of iron 
combined with 
the rich white 
finish derived 
from perfect 
"porcelain en- 
ameling. 

STANDARD IDEAL 
PORCELAIN EN- 
AMELED WARE 

is of non-porous 
one-piece construction, leaving no joints, turns or crevices for dirt, dust or 
germs to accumulate. It is absolutely Sanitary. 

We make Bath Tubs, Sitz Baths, Shower Baths, Lavatories, Urinal Ranges. 
Slop Hoppers, Laundry Tubs, Sinks, Closet Ranges, Steamship Supplies. 
Railway Car Supplies, Hospital Appliances, etc. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

The Standard Ideal Co.. Limited 

Head Offices and Factories, - PORT HOPE, Ont. 

Sales Offices and Sample Rooms, 50 Colborne Street, TORONTO 
128 West Craig Street, MONTREAL, and 24 Telfer Block, WINNIPEG 




IMPROVED 



WIRE 

TRACE 

CHAINS 



Every chain guaranteed. 
Gives universal satisfaction. 



THE 



B. GREENING WIRE CO. 



LIMITED 



Hamilton, Ont, Montreal, Que. 




GENUINE 



It Pays to Stock Our Lines 





"SATURN " 



"SATURN 



"SATURN 



AUTOMATIC INJECTOR 

The choice of all intelligent 
engineers and manufacturers. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER. 



Plain Compression Grease Cups 

A good cup for general use. Made of 
red metal and well finished. 

PENBERTHY INJECTOR CO., LIMITED, 

\A/ INDSOR, ONT. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Manufacturers of 

Iron and Steel Wire 

Barb Wire 

Galvanized Wire 

Coiled spring Fencing 

Brass Wire 

Copper Wire 

Wire Nails 

Wood Screws 

Staples 

Jack Chain 

Bright Wire Coods 

Spring Cotters 

Steel Wire Barrel Hoops 



WIRE MANUFACTURING CU. 

MONTREAL TORONTO L "" UD 

Do not put off too long in sending us your 
specification for 

WIRE NAILS 

WOOD SCREWS 

HAY BALING WIRE 

We want to satisfy all our customers and 
for this reason we offer the above advice. 




THE POSTED 
DEALER KNOWS 



that H & R gives greatest revolver value for the 
money. The new 



H&R 



DOUBLE ACTION 
REVOLVER MODEL 1906 



Model 
1906 




is no exception to the rule. It is surprisingly good for the price. Surprisingly 
cheap for so good a revolver. Is a thoroughly well made, durable and serviceable 
arm. Light in weight, only ten ounces, and small in size, it is particularly 
adapted for those who desire a safe and efficient revolver at a moderate price. 



Specifications 



22 Calibre, Seven Shot, Rim Fire, Double Action; 2'_- in. Barrel, 
Finest Nickel Finish. Also made with Hi in. and 6 in. barrel. 



The Celebrated H & R Hammerless is always a good seller. Write for 
Catalog of Revolvers and Single Barrel Shot Guns. 

HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

314 Park Ave., - Worcester, Mass. 



H& R 

Greatest 

Revolver 

Value for 

the 

Money 



23 



1 1 \ K I ) \Y \ R K \ND METAL 



i 



H. BOKER &. CO.'S CUTLERY 

me 



j 







Recommend Boker's Pocket Knives, Scissors and Razors, if you want 
to work up a good Cutlery trade, and at the same time insure for yourself 
a good profit. You can double your cost price on every sale and still give good value 
and satisfaction to your patrons. 

FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES 



I 



«^v#vv^rvm?$ff^$fvif#l$vl$#l«vvvfvv^vvvyftvv« V fTftTV«T*fTvrfTrvfVtt v | 



■i 



Telegraphic Address : 
"MADDERETTE, LONDON" 

W. J. COWAN 

AND 

SONS 
Fine Colour Manufacturers 

Works: 
Hague St.. Bethnal Creen, London, E. 

SPECIALTIES : 

Blues, all shades and qualities 
Chromes, " " 

Greens, " " 

Imitation Vermilion and Carmine 
Lakes 

Also all colours made from 

Aniline, Cochineal, Madder, Wood Extracts 
Llthol, Paranitraniline, Etc. 

REPRESENTATIVE 

WM. O. GREENWAY 

13 ST. JOHN ST., - MONTREAL 




Will Hold up A Shelf 

That's what a shelf brackets for. 
For this purpose there can be 
Nothing Better. Nothing 
C h k a p e is than the BRADLEY STEEI 
BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong and 
Light. The saving on freight is a good profit 
aside from the lower price at which the goodf 
are sold. Order direct or through your jobbers 

ATLA8 MFC. CO., New Haven. 




ti 



Quality Unsurpassed ' ' 




HIGH-GRADE MATERIAL, 
Skilled Workmen, 

Up-to-date Equipment, 

Careful Supervisioi 

Account for the success of 

Belleville ^ Brand 

HORSE SHOES 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Toronto and Belleville Rolling Mills 




HEP 



Everyone intending fence building should send for our folder on Erecting 
Fences, It's full of valuable information on fence building, tells how to erect 
woven wire fencing quickly and substantially, describes the manufacture of 
fence wire and has an article quoted from bulletin of U. 8. Dept. of Agriculture 
on concrete post making, showing how these durable posts can be economically 
made at home. Don't fail to write for acopy. It'sfree. 

Tin: it awvi;i.i. iiomi. WIIUS Jb'EKCE CO., Ltd. 
Dept. J Hamilton, Ontario. Winnipeg, Manitoba. 



1 vvitm Trie V 



24 



II A U I) W A R E \ N I) M ET \ I 



I WILL TALK 



to practically every Hardware merchant in Canada from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific. 1 cannot do it all in one day, but during the first twenty-four hours 
I will deliver your message to every Hardware merchant in < )ntario. I trawl 
all day Sunday and on Monday morning there will not be a village within 
the limits of Halifax in the East and Brandon in the West, into which 1 
will not have penetrated. 

I cannot go any further East, so I now devote all my energies to the 
West, and so many new towns are springing up here each week that I 
haven't as much time as I used to have to enjoy the scenery. But I like 
talking to hardwaremen, clerks, travellers and manufacturers, especially 
as they are always glad to see me and hear the news J have to tell them. 
Tuesday noon I am at Calgary, Wednesday noon at Kamloops, and by 
Thursday morning I reach Vancouver, having been in all the mining towns 
and all through the fruit districts of British Columbia. 

I have been eighteen years on the road and I have a pretty good con- 
nection. I never intrude when a man is busy, but just bide my time, be- 
cause I know men pay far more attention to what you have to say if you 
catch them when they have a few moments to spare. So 1 often creep 
into their pocket when they are going home at night, and when supper 
is over Mr. Hardwareman usually finds me. He must he glad to see me, 
because he listens to what I have to say for an hour or more. 

I try to always tell the truth, and men put such confidence in what I 
say that I would feel very sorry to deceive them even inadvertently. Prob- 
ably some other week I will tell you about the different classes of people I 
meet. In the meantime if you want a message delivered to HARD- 
WAREMEN, PLUMBERS, CLERKS, MANUFACTURERS or TRAV- 
ELLERS — and want it delivered quickly — I'm your man. 




THE WANT AD MAN 



Condensed Advertisements in Hardware and 
Metal cost 2c. per word for first insertion, 
ic per word for subsequent insertions. Box 
number 5c. extra. Send money with adver- 
tisement. Write or phone our nearest office 



Hardware and Metal 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



How Many Dollars Would You Save ? 

Mr. Dealer 1 If you could diffuse the light of day throughout your store, while daylight 
lasted, how much would you save in hard cash annually ? Figure it out for your profit's sake, 
Ms well as for your customers', and tell us the result. 

MAXimum LIGHT GLASS 

will Mood the darkest corner of your store with natural light while there's light in the sky. 
Et can be effectively used when placed directly in the window sash, where ordinary prismatic 
glass would be useless. 

Shouldn't you know more about this dollar-saving window glass, just as a matter of good 
business sense ? Our big illustrated catalogue will interest you. Send for it. 



The Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited 






LORDOR 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 

Manufacturer* RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 

HIGH-GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES 

MONTREAL. 



A Certain Sense 

of Satisfaction 



1830 1907 



Seymours 
shears 



STANDARD 

FOR OVER 
HALF A CENTURY 

FULLY WARRANTED 



Above is a reproduction of Show Card 9 in. x 15 in- in colors which we will send free to dealers in 

exchange for business card. 

HENRY T. SEYMOUR SHEAR COMPANY. WIEBUSCH AND HILGER, LIMITED, Sole Agents, NEW YORK 

26 




goes with every MERRELL PORTABLE HAND 
MACHINE, PIPE THREADING and CUTTING 
MACHINE. We build them that way. 

For doing all kinds of threading— under all con- 
ditions — labor trouble and faulty material included 
—where speed, durability and ease of control count 
for something, our word to you is to investigate the 
MERRELL. i 

Whether it be stationary or portable— hand or 
power driven— 30 DAYS FREE TRIAL must 
prove conclusively that your choice should be the 
MERRELL. 

This Portable Hand Machine has encased gears, 
MERRELL standard quick opening and closing die- 
head, and the latest improved Cutting-otf Knife. 

Let us tell you more about this machine — The 
Chasers, Vise and the large range of work covered. 



Catalogue for the asking. 
Quick shipments. 

CANADIAN FAIRBANKS GO. 

Sole Agents lot Canada Limited 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER 



THE 



I { \ R I ) W \ R E AM) MET'I, 



THE LAW SAYS YOU MUST 



Do you know that a man is obliged by law 
to keep a proper set of books ? 

The law says : 

" Any man who (ails and has not for five 
years before his failure kept proper books 
shall be liable to a fine of $800.00 and one 
year's imprisonment. 

Since you must keep books of some 
sort, and as the law insists that you 




•S«okW 



and with less work than the old-style methods 
of bookkeeping. 

Business Systems are not expensive 
to put in in the first place — the cost is 
in proportion to the size of the business, 
and they enable one clerk to do the 
work of two. 

Business Systems allow your clerks 
to put their work before you in such 



keep proper books, why not keep them prop- shape that you can see at a glance how every 

erly? 

It is just as easy to 



do a thing right as it is 

to do it wrong. 

# # # |# * 

Business Systems 
mean absolute accuracy, 



thing stands. 

BUSfWESS 



MMTTEO 
84 SPADINA AVENUE 
TORONTO - - - CANADA 



* # # * # 

Drop us a one-cent 
post card asking for 
further particulars. 

You don't have to buy 

unless we can suit you. 

860 



<" N 




FOR PLATE 



Will Call on You 

Our Canadian representative is 
calling on the trade from Montreal 
to Vancouver. His trip will oc- 
cupy about three months. He 
will be pleased to show you our 
complete line of Silverware, 
Cutlery, Flasks, etc. 
Kindly address the Montreal 
office, making an appointment. 

Z5he House of Hutton 

Established in England in 1600 



Sole Canadian Agent 
W.J.GRANT, Lindsay Bldg., MONTREAL 



»0 E ^ 




FOR CUTLERY 



The Howland Pump Oiler 



FOR SALE BY 




J. H. Ashdown Hdw Co., 
Geo. 0. Wood & Co., 
Miller-Morse Hdw. Co., 
Jas. Robinson & Co., 
Lewis Bros., Ltd., 



Winnipeg 



Montreal 



A slight 

pressure of the 

thumb 

regulates the 

flow. 



Maple City Manufacturing Co. 

Monmouth, III. 



27 



H A R n \Y ARE A N D M E T \ L 



High-grade Bathroom Fixtures 



a 



-S=_ 



w 




ARE MADE IN CANADA BY 



The Carriage Mountings Co., Limited, Toronto 






World's Best Cutlery 

You make no mistake in specifying goods made by 

JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS, Limited 

A reputation of over 200 years 



^ANTED ^ when ordering cutlery. 

at stake, insures the quality of every article. 



Write for catalogues from Sole Canadian Agents 

JAMES HUTTCN & COMPANY, MONTREAL 




NO ACID OR GRIT 

will be found in "Majestic" polishes 
The brilliant and lasting lustre im- 
parted by " Majestic " polishes is 
not susceptible to atmospheric con- 
ditions and weather changes. 

Majestic" polishes are une- 
qualled for brass, copper, nickel 
and all finished metallic surfaces. 
Write for sample and prices. 71 
MAJESTIC POLISHES. Limited 

575 Yonge Street - - Toronto, Canada 




The John Morrow Screw, Limited 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONTARIO 



Shear making "up-to-date" is found in 

HEINISCH 

TAILORS' SHEARS, 
TRIMMERS, SCISSORS, 
TINNERS' SNIPS, ETC. 
"Best in the World" 

Since 1825, and a steady increase in sales 
due to their superior cutting quality. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 

NEWARK, N.J., U.S.A. 

New York Office tnd Stleuoom, 155 Chtmbert St. 




Manufacturers' Agents 

ALEXANDER "gTFI 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence invited from 
firms wishing to be represented. 



CHARLES H. FOX 

Vancouver, Canada 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 
Selling to the Hardware Jobbers Only. 
Representing Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers, correspondence invited. Cable 
Address, Chasfox Vancouver, P.O.Box 1105. 

H. W. MITCHELL 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Correspondence is solicited from manufacturers 
wishing a representative in Winnipeg. 

Travellers call regularly on the wholesale and 
retail trade in Western Canada. 

Highest references and financial responsibility. 



Expert Bookkeeping 

Investigation and auditing of all classes 
of accounts undertaken. Trading, profit 
and loss accounts and balance sheets 
prepared. Sets of books opened and 
office systems devised in an up-to-date 
manner. Collection of accounts a 
specialty. 

Davenport, Pickup & Co. 

622 Mclnljre Block and 422 Ashdown Block 

WINNIPEG MAN. 
AND AT BRANDON, MAN, 

Square your Accounts 
Forwell Foundry Co. 

BERLIN, ONT. 

Manufacturers of 

SOIL PIPE, FITTINGS, and CAST IRON SINKS 

Ask Jobbers for <• F. F. CO " Brand 



Covert Mfg. Co 

TROY, N.Y. 



Harness Snaps, Chain, 
Rope and Web Goods, 
i etc. For sale by Jobbers at 
Manufacturers' prices. 



AN ARM8TR0NC BORINC TOOL 

is always ready for use. Should be on 
every lathe. Waves all forging. 7upercent 
Grinding ; 90 per cent, tool steel. 
Write for catalogue. 



ARMSTRONG BROS. 

TOOL CO., 
106 N. Francisco 

Ave., 
CHICAGO, U. S. A. 







\ - " ] 



GALVABng 

the CANADA METAL CO. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

••©•®«®*®#®#®«®«®«®«®«®«®«««*«®#®«®j 



Our Fireproof Windows 

ARE WINDPROOF 




These windows are easily distinguished 
from the ordinary kind by their windproof 
qualities. No other Fireproof Windows on 
the Canadian market exclude the wind so 
effectively as ours. 

All parts are perfectly uniform, because 
the whole window is stamped by steam power 
with steel dies. 

Our Fireproof Windows are fully described 
in our new Catalogue No. 18 and Folder A 103, 
both of which are sent free for the asking. 

Let us figure on your contracts. 
"WE WORK WITH THE TRADE/' 

tub Metal SMngle & Siline Co., Limitefl 

Preston, Ont. 



Montreal 

Cor St. Catherine and Delorimier 



® 

i 



Toronto 



® 



® 



® 

i 



® 
® 
® 



® 

i 

® 
® 



® 

I 

• 

I 

® 
® 



ST, JOHN, N.B. 
Emerson & Fisher, Limited 
CALGARY 
Ellis & Grogan 



SALES AGENTS: 



100 Esplanade St. East ' 



WINNIPEG 
QUEBEC Clare & Brocket) 

J. A. Bernard VANCOUVER 

McLennan, McFeely & Co.. Limited 



® 



•••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••.•i 



The 



Buffalo, N.Y, s W 

When you get our goods you know you 
get THE BEST. 

We manufacture 
Water Filters 
Water Coolers 
Chafing Dishes 
Table Kettles ana" 

Stands 
Coffee Extractors 
Wine Coolers 
Nursery Chests 
Baking Dishes 
Crumb Trays and 

Scrapers 
Tea and Bar Urns 
Bathroom Fixtures 
Coal Vases and 

Hods 
Candlesticks 
Cuspidors 
Match Safes, Etc. 

All High Grade and exceedingly presentable. 

REPRESENTED BY 

h. f. Mcintosh & co. 




51 Yonge Street 



Write for 

Catalogue 



TORONTO, ONT. 



QUICK SALES 

and good profits are naturally the outcome of 
handling 

Empire, Imperial and Champion 

AXE HANDLES 

To keep up the profitable pace see that you are 
always kept supplied with our 

Hammer, Sledge and Pick Handles 



Lists and discounts sent free upon request. 



J. H. Still Manufacturing Company, 



ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO 



Limited 



29 



II \ R DW \ R F. A N D MET \ I. 



Kemp Manufacturing Company 

INona/ Improved Cereal Oooker 



104 4 pints inside dish 

106-6 

108 8 




104 — $13.50 per dozen 
106— $17.50 
108 — $22.00 



DIAMOND AND 



AIRL. WARES 



Kemp Manufacturing Co. 

Toronto, Can. 



The Kemp Mfg. & Metal Co., Limited 

111 Lombard St.. "WINNIPEG 



The Kemp Mfg. Co. of Montreal 

39 St. Anloine St.. MONTREAL 




RESULTS COUNT 

All the little talks we give you about CAPE WELL 
HORSE NAILS would be useless unless our goods 
more than backed up all we said. 

The best material, the most up-to-date machinery and 
skilled workmen, backed up by a loyal and capable 
selling staff, have made our product what it is td-day 
universally used and everywhere admitted "THE 
BEST." 

Don't let your stocks run too low this hot weather. 



Prices, Samples, Catalogue and 1907 Calendar free on request. 

THE CAPEWELL HORSE NAIL CO., TORONTO, ONT. 

Branch Offices and Warehouses: WINNIPEG AND VANCOUVER 





HARDWARE AND METAL 



Cash Better Than Credit System 

Pertinent comment by George Brett on the only safe and profitable method of conducting a mercantile business. 



Everj few years the business world 
imagines it lias discovered some ne\i 
principle Not infrequently alter it has 
tried to put the new principle into 
practice it wakes up to the fact that a 
mistake has hecu made. 

One of the latest theories in business 
i- that it is possible to build up a big- 
paying business on credit. People are 
urged to believe that they can live and 
die "ii credit. There has been an orgy of 
credit talk; hut there are indications 
that the world of industrj is waking up 
to the fact that the new theory is not 
all that it is ■Clacked up to be." It 

iming to realize that the old ideas 

about credit being a vicious principle 

on which habituallj to do business, are 

^.Hiiid. 

Chief among the guiding rules of the 

late Marshall Field were t he motto's 

■■|)o business on a cash basis," "Never 
borrow." If it is absolutely necessary 
to give credit then "Sell on a shorter 
time than competitors." Make every in- 
ducement to the buyer to pay tor his 
goods as soon as possible. 

People often fail to grasp the truth 
that the success of the gigantic mail 
order houses is as much due to their 
doing business on a strictly cash basis 
o anj other factor. The enormous 
success of the mammoth stores of Pila- 
delphia, New Vork, Chicago, etc., large- 
ly can be explained by the "small pro- 
lit, epiick return" idea being everlast- 
ingly put into operation. 

Pay When You Buy. 

In stores the most satisfactory way 
of doing- business is to see what you 
aie getting after a careful examination, 
pay for your purchase, and walk away 
with your parcel under your arm. Of 
course, if it is too heavy, you have to 
ask for van deliverj . 

This is the way the storekeeper 
likes things to be done, and it 
Bvery'one would pay for small purchases 
and take them away it would enable 
the retailer to sell his goods on a 
smaller margin of profit. The stores 
asked to send a few needles or a box 
of handkerchief's by delivery van lose 
much of their profit on such transac- 
tions. They usually do not make a large 
amount on shoppers who continually ask 
to have goods sent "C.O.D." Often by 
i he time the shopper has reached home 
her mind has changed, and when the de 
livery man trudges up live flights of 
-tails the lady is "not at home; no in 
-t ructions have been left." Then, after 
a vain attempt to deliver the goods the 
next day and the day after, the goods 
are put back into stock. This is not 
doing business on a credit basis; but 
it is the halfway post to it. The element 
of delay in getting the money enters 
ucli transactions, with attendant 
danger to the retailer. 

The man who aims to do business on 
a credit basis i- often in an infinitelj 
worse predicament Not infrequent! 
great tmounl ol firm 
1 1 ''it h in making a it and i hen 



the goods as well. Who pays for such 

.' The honest man or woman who 
pays up, That is why it pays both the 

retailer and individual to do business on 

a cash basis as much as possible. You 

are not paying for the sins of "dead 
beats" and chronic debtors when you 
trade with a man who does business on 
a cash basis onl\ . 

Collect When You Sell. 

The beneficial results of doing business 
on a cash basis are far reaching. The 
retailer who abstains from giving credit 
and buying more goods than he can pay 

for quickly has a better reputation with 

wholesalers than the one who always 
has a lot of mone\ outstanding and who 
continually is buying goods for which 
he is going to pay when he himself gets 
his money from a hundred different 

sources. 

If this matter were pursued further it 
would be seen that the individual hint- 
sell purposes paying provided he gets 
some money. The chain of credit has 
generally a weak link somewhere. 

D. A. Kimbark. in a lecture before the 
University of Chicago, gave the Eollow 
ing lucid example, showing how it pin - 
to do business on a cash basis. Suppose 
that two firms applied for credit on a 
bill of goods. The first trader has : 

\ ssets 

Stock on hand.!....'..". .' $28,000 

Trusted out 14,000 

('ash on hand 

Total $42,000 

Liabilities. 

Due bank $ 7, odd 

Merchandise not due 15.000 

Merchandise due 4. 500 



Total *>7.()fMi 

Net worth 15.000 

The second firm had : 
Assets. 

Stock on baud S..") 000 

Cash on hand .' I 000 



..$6,000 



Total 

I .labilities- none. 

Cash Business Valued Highly. 

Tt is safe to say that the latter trader 
would be given credit gladly by any- 
wholesale house, while in the former 
case, though the man was worth two 
and a half times as much ,.s the latter 
it would be hard for him to gel credit . 
lie is carrying too large a stock, living 
too much in the regions of credit for 
his good. 

The man who does business on a cash 
basis can secure far better terms than 
the man who wants a long time to pay 
bis account, with the wholesaler. Some 
of the bargains secured by the mam 
moth maii order houses who have plenty 
of ready monej on hand all the time 
ai e almost ok i a dible The -mall retailei 

who , an pax nn l- I immediately un 

doubt ''It- get thi "It he bai 

in t he w hob • I il !'l \ In. 

3 1 



credit men know d. They pass 

no sleepless nights in thinking whether 
ale I .. trust such a man. and he 
is going to gel a bettei deal from the 
wholesale! than his competitor who 
stalls on credit. 

The trader who does business on a 

ca li basis reallv gets the cream of the 

buying market, lie usually gets those 

hft v t wo weeks in the 

ii 

The merchant who does business on a 
credit basis does not get such* a good 
class of people. 

Specific Date for Payment Best. 

The question of divine, credit centres 
at all times int.. the lite of almost. 
everyone. It is almost impossible to 

make a rule never to extend credit, but 
when it. is necessary there should be a 
hard and fast understanding about re 
payment . 

A writer for a weekly papei ;agel; 
remarked that nearlj all bad debts are 
due to lack of proper investigation and 
a want of understanding at first. When 
a man asks for credit, be should be asked 
the least amount that will satisfy hitn. 
Suppose a man goes into a grocery 
stoic, and, acting upon this rule, the 
storekeeper finds out that a monthly 
ci edit of $25 will be satisfactory. The 
retailer then tells the man Oath' atid in 
strong terms, that having set his own 
tune. the customer must absolutely 
abide bv the terms made. A certain 
date should always be named— say the 
first of the month, and tin- time of pa} 
incut vividly impressed on the custom- 
er's mind. Nine times out of ten he will 
meet his obligations. Hut if the date set 
he indefinite, say between the first and 
seventh, negligence will almost inevit- 
ably ensue. 

Cash on Hand Big Help. 

The example is applicable in a Large 
degree to individuals. It is not enough 
to have wealth; but it is also a wise 
thing to have a certain amount of cash 
on hand to meet emergencies. How man j 
men turn their cash into a lot of per 

sonal effects and unnecessary household 

v.. ...ds which could not lie sold for one 
third of what was paid lor them if they 
had to be converted int., read] moneyf 
How many people mortgage their future 
earnings by buying a lot of stuff "on 
time"' which is not half as useful when 
bought as the rnonej itself would be? 
The habit of buying things when the 
ready money has been saved up makes 

i pie infinitely wiser indues of values 

and enables them to make better bar- 
gains. Further, those who deal on a 
cash basis save much needless worry 
about making paj ment s 

"Net er place a .- on your 

holdings" was another motto of Mr. 

I lie referred to present holdings. 

li he thought it unwise to mortgage 

nt belomrings lie would have said 

it was infinitely more foolish to mort 

future holdings Yet thi - 
lv w bat the man d tak( cri 



H A R D W A RE AND MET A L 



Effective Hardware Advertising 

HOW TO PRODUCE IT 



1>> T. JohnttOn Stewart. 



••A ven good test for an advertisei 
to apply to an advertisement is to ask 
himself llif question, 'What would a 
mail order house or a department store 
(Id with the space which I have at my 
command?' If the advertiser (Vols thai 
he has employed the space as ii would be 
employed by one of the greal com 
whose success lias been built up by ad- 
vertising, In- may rest satisfied with his 
ml. Bui one thing is certain 
pert and successful advertiser would 
dream of paying for space in a news- 
paper and use ii i" say. 'Hardware and 
Stoves for Sale by John Smith, -5 or 
'Come i" John Johnson's for your 
Sieves and Ranges.' In fancy you can 



That's snuiitl commercial sense everj 
word of it, and both you and 1 know 
more than a few dealers who might read 
ii a second time with profit. The idea 
that ordinary business publicity requir- 
ed exceptional talent lias been exploded. 
Shrewd dealers know that the funda- 
mental principle in all advertising is jusi 
average, everj day common sense, com 
bined with a salesmanlike knowledge of 
their wans. Of course, there arc a few 
dealers who advertise immensely better 
than their fellows. They are to the 
manner horn, as it were, [f there is a 
better way of stating a fact a more 
seductive, sales-compelling way, you may 
be sure thai they state it in just that 



New Kitchen Utensils 

Our Household ami Kitchen Goods section has just been loaded up 
with new Enameled ami Tinware, bought direct from the makers at prices 
that make it possible for us to save you money on every article you buy 
from ns. Every piece is warranted first quality. 

WE DO NOT SELL SECONDS. 
Economical housekeepers will find this department of our store an 
interesting and profitable place toshop. We are glad to have you come in 
and look, whether you buy or not. 

SOME PRICES. 



Sauce Pans 15c. to 75c. Double Boilers 



65c. to $1.50 



Tea Pots 35c. 

Large Tin Pish Pans 35c. 



to 70c. White Pudding Dishes 15c. 

to 45c. Deep Stove Pots 80c. and 90e. 

KITCHEN CUTLERY. 

No need to spoil good table cutlery in the kitchen. A small outlay 
line will buy a complete outfit of knives, forks and spoons for kitchen 
use. ^ 

Kitchen Knives .... 75c. to $1 doz. 
" Knives and forks. 



Kill 



60c. to $] per set of (i 

Bread Knives 15c. to 60c. ea. 

Carving Knives -■"><•. to title. 

Mounted Grindstones.. $1.25 

Cutlery. It's the reputation 



len Tea Spoons .... 20c. doz. 
" Dessert Spoons. 40c. doz. 

Table Spoons .. 50c. doz. (( 

" " Forks . . 50c. doz. u 

" Sharp'g Stones. 15c. each << 

Our strOng suit is High tirade Tabh 
for quality that is building our big cutlery business. We're showing 
two special lines of Celluloid Handle Steel Tabh' Knives at $2.50 and 
50 per doz. Ask to see them. 

The Hardwaremen 

THE McLEOD HARDWARE CO., LTD. 

2J3 CHARLOTTE STREET 



me space tilled by the catalogue 
house or the department store with 
snappy descriptions of the goods, with 
plenty of prices to attract and int< 

the reader., anil with cuts aol too big. 
bill of a suitable size for the space. 

"Il is worth while lo spend time and 
ell'oii in preparing advertising copy, for 
I he mere rent ine of the space is only n 
preliminary . The filling il wit h propi i 
'pulhng' matter is the main thing." 



way. These men would make splendid 
sales managers for the largest concerns 
in the Dominion. They serve to prove 
a favorite contention of the writer's, 
viz.. that the best admen arc pretty 
nearly always practical men, with a 
thorough knowledge of their public and 
i he -nods they have for sale. While 

this is undeniably line, vet, there are 

scores of dealers who cling to the old 
ideas of publicity, fancying thai it is 

32 



enough for the general- public to know 

thai they are in the hardware and metal 

business. 

There i- no secret about the extreme 

access of most successful merchants, 

flie\ simply recognize advertising as a 

uecessarj factor in all twentieth century 

business mil as a means conceived by 
publishers for the purpose of adding to 

their bank accounts. And Mr. Dealer! 

if trade has been slow, yini can depend 

upon ii thai the lack of advertising or 
the fault of your advertising, explains 
the reason why. Ii is not enough thai 
you should buy space in your favorite 

paper the shrewd dealer plays no fax - 

oriies in i he advertising game you must 
lill up ihat space with a trade-bringing 
announcement. .Most of my readers have 

seen the catalogues issued by big mail 

order establishments. Your chief com- 
petitor does not waste space. lie prob- 
ably has paid dearly for his experience 
and he tills his catalogue up with breezy. 
snappy descriptive mailer. The whole 
is nicely arranged ami price talks — not 

I Ily. bm convincingly, throughout. 

Now. il you read over our first para- 
graph again you will benefit yourself 
and understand just why we quoted so 
much of our contemporary- The Ameri- 
can Artisan and Hardware Record. 



The McLeod Hardware Company some 
time ago mailed us a few samples of very 
effective advertising. They say: "We 
aim to make every dollar spent for ad- 
vertising pay, and it does, as we have 
found much profit in what others have 
contributed'. We are sending you some 
efforts of our own, in the hope that they 
will benefit some others who push the in- 
teresting trade." 

The McLeod way of advertising- must 
pay. They specialize some particular 
line in each ad., such as washing ma- 
chines, tools, builders' supplies, etc., and 
it is evidenl that they change their ad. 
quite frequently. The ad. we reprint, and 
improve somewhat in the set-Up, may or 
max mil be the best ad. this firm has 

sent in. but al all events, it is strong and 
".nod enough to clearly portray the Mc 
I ji i »il style. That introduction dues seem 
a little loo long, bill when Mtie reads il 
over one finds lots of good business 
sense in il. The .McLeod Company sim- 
ply tell the reasons they have for hold 
ing a kitchen utensil sale, and then go' 
on to let the prices talk. The arrange 
men! does not call for any eulogy, 
neither can one criticize it much. < len 
tlemen, if you have an original copy of 
this ad., you will agree with us when 
we say that prices might have been more 
effectively brought out. All the ads. you 
have forwarded are good— I he. illustrat- 
ed ones especially so. Of course, you 
understand thai it is practically impos- 
sible for us lo reproduce an ad. illus- 
trated by manufacturers' cuts. This is 
so obvious thai we need not. give any 
other reason for our choice in this par- 
ticular case. 



il \RDWARE AND METAL 



A Study of Co-operative Stores 



Some of the claims of the Co-operatives analyzed by an English editor Retaile 
Great Britain forming societies of their own along co-operative lines. 



rs m 



Tlic pretentious claim thai the co- 
operative stores movement is based .mi 
noble ideals n<. longer carries conviction 
t.. sensible people. We all recognize that 

at t he out se1 the promoters of 1 be i 
operative i<lea were inspired by Loft} 
visions of the brotherhood of man. So 
much credit is certainly due to fchem; 
their intentions were excellent. The co 
operative movement is now, however, a 
matter of bistors ; it has a long ret ord 
of years behind it; it is to be criticized 
n.. t by its aims but by its deeds. 

That the movement has been a sue 
Cess of a kind is beyond doubt. The 
enormous figures to which we are treat- 
ed at the co-operative congresses arc 
eloquent evidence of the fact that a 
great section of the public, more es 
pecially in the north of England and in 
Scotland, has fastened on to the system 
with enthusiasm. Dividends have a po- 
tent charm for us all. whether we are co- 
operators or non co operators. There is 
no thine- inherently contemptible in divi- 
dends, so long as they are earned on 
sound business lines. 

"Idealism" a Delusion. 

A distinction, however, must be drawn 
between "divi" and dividend. The root 
difference between co-ops. and non-co- 
ops, is that the former draw their 
"divi" with unwarranted references to 
idealism and to the brotherhood of man, 
whereas the latter draw their profits 
without deception and without any 
sugared platitudes. A few leaders of 
"the movement," and some amiable, 
but unbusinesslike, divines may still 
harbor the delusion that co-operative 
stores have brought us nearer to the 
millennium. The practical man who faces 
tacts as they .are, has Ion? ago rul him- 
self of any of these delusions. The very 
manner in which the advocates of co- 
operative stores treat criticism is a 
proof of their lack of even the rudiments 
of fraternal charity. 

Recently the Weekly Scotsman has 
been giving considerable space to argu- 
ments pro and con -the co-operative 
stores. The correspondence was started 
in the interests of truth and fair plav, 
and equal opportunities were given to 
both sides to state their views. The re- 
sult has been that a co-operative journal 
has charged the editor of our contem- 
porary with concocting the letters 
which were published against "co-op." 
Needless to say, the Weekly Scotsman 
repudiates this gross charge of false- 
hood, fraud and wilful imposition. The 
very fact, however, that the charge was 
made, is evidence of the state of mind 
of these men who cry aloud that they 
are conducting- business on noble [deals. 

Craving for Dividends. 

There is little need For us to inform 
our readers that the idealism with 
which co operators attempt to vest their 
-tores is not justified. Nof need we tear 

a passion to tatters in condemning this 

claim Rather is it better to accept the 
fact that "co-op. divi," based although 



it is on ignorance of business principles, 
is favored bj a certain section of the 
public. It follows that the private 
trader might, where the exigiencies of 

co op. competition render 

attempl to adapt his own business to 

the craving tor "divi." 
Strip tin- .-.. operator of his shams, 

and we find he is a shrewd business 
man who takes lull advantage of the 
fact that In- customer is not influenced 
by love for his fellov man. but. b\ love 
lor himself. However much we maj be 
opposed to the "divi" system, the fact 

t hat it appeals to a certain class of cus 

tomers must be taken into account. Il 
they cannot appreciate the duct busi 
ness method of selling- an article at bed 
rock prices, after allowing sufficient 
margin for expenses and fair profit, the 
private trader must of sheer necessity 
adapt his system to suit them. One 
method is to change discounts into divi 

(lends 

Co-operatives Only Advantage. 

The private trader can sell as cheaplv 
as the co-operative store. He can buy 
better, and lie can manage his shop 
better. So far the competitors meet on 
fair lighting- terms. The only advantage 
that the co-operative store in reality 
possesses is its method of returning a 
part of the purchase money to the cus- 
tomer. Why, some people are now ask- 
ing, should not private traders combine 
among- themselves, and also arrange to 
return to their customers a part of the 
purchase money ? The suggestion is 
being made that private traders should 
form co-operative societies among- them- 
selves, and agree to give their custom- 
ers dividends instead of discounts. Not 
only the co-operative store, but, also the 
trading- stamp system and the clothing- 
club system — both of which have some 
strong- features of resemblance to the 
co-operative system can, it, is believed, 
be most effectually eombatted by these 
means. Retailers are, in short, being- in- 
vited to fig-lit these competitors with 
the competitors' own weapons. 

The' formation of a co-operative pri 
vatc traders' society will tie, it is ar- 
gued, an effective counter-blast to all 
these forms of competition. The weak- 
ness of the trading stamp system and 
the clothing- club system lies in the fact 
that they represent intervention between 
tradesman and customer in the interest 
of Some outside third party. Now a so- 
operative private traders' society, pro- 
perly conducted, would intervene only in 
the interest of the members of the so- 
ciety. Already societies of this kind 
have been formed, and we wish them 
success so long as thej are organized 
on the right lines, namely, lines of mu- 
tual benefit and not of profit to outside 
thud parties. They should be societies 
in which all private tracers are eligible 
for membership without distinction. 
provided that they are willing- to con- 
tribute their share to tin- expenses. We 
should regret any pi..].., sal to allow 
oulv i .il.- i .-( ailei in each class of t rado 
to join. 

33 



A Genuine Co-operative Movement. 

A societv which singles out. certain 

tradesmen for participation in its bene 

lit-, is not a whole hearted cooperative 

ity, but mil el- ,i ociety to give one 

particular tradesman an advantage ovei 

another. It due- not seem to offer anv 

real or Lasting solution to the problem 

..! the compel it ion of the co op. b1 

It i- mererj adding confusion and mak 

nig the lot of the private trade-man. 
regarded as a das-, more difficull and 

complicated We trust, there! 
that this new method of meeting- co 
operative and other competition — a 
method which is already taking- shape 
in certain districts will be a genuine 
co-operative method among all private 
traders without distinction, and not 
merelj a societv which is a clique, and 
\\ hich, w rule ostensibly lighting 1 1 , 
operative -tore-, i- m r.-alitv tending 
to .rush out other private traders who 
are not privileged to join the clique. 

Where retailers are invited to join 
societies which are not open to all bona 
fide private traders without distinction 
but which are open t<. only one retailer 
of a particular trade, we should advise 
them to refuse the application. The so- 
cieties which should be joined are those 
which are conducted on lines similar to 
the many mutual plate glass' assurance 
societies throng-bout the kingdom— soci- 
eties which hold an "open door" to all 
bona fide traders in the district. 



HANDY WRENCH. 

An improved wrench has been patent- 
ed by A. I>. Moss. Sandusky. Ohio. A- 
no swinging- movement of. the handle is 
required in ibis improvement, it is evident 
thai the wrench can be used to great ad- 
vantage for turning bolts, nuts, and the 
like located in places not readily acces- 
sible to an ordinary wrench. The tool 
may. however, be used as an ordinary 
wrench. Mr. Moss has invented anoth- 
er wrench, such as shown and describ- 
ed in his application for former Letters 
Patenl of the l . s. [ts object is to pro- 
vide a new and improved tool, more 
especially designed for turning- nuts, 
screws, and other articles in places not 
easily accessible by ordinary wrench, - 



A CHEAP PRESENT. 

Mrs. Greene met a friend, and in the 

-e of conversation, remarked: 
"Mj husband's birthday comes next 

k." 
"Well." asked the other lady, "what 
gift are you choosing him f" 

Mi- "iieene smiled proudly as sh( 
plied: 

"I've been taking- a cigar out of his 

.-very day now lor the last fon, 

month-, and have a hundred now which 

I'll give to him for a birthday present." 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Sporting Goods 



MANUFACTURE OF BOWS AND 
ARROWS. 

Tin' growth in the revival on litis side 
nf t In- Atlantic of the ancienl sport of 
tirchery- has broughl to the trade's notice 
one of tlic must novel forms of experl 
handicraft in the range of American 
industries. This is the manufacture of 
long hows and hunting and target ar- 




| 



Fig- 1. 



rows bj Mr. I''. S. Barnes, of Forest 
Grove, Oregon. The Barnes hows are 
rapidly being adopted by the most ex- 
perl archers in all purls of the world. 
not so much perhaps because of bis ex- 
cellent skill in manufacture — although 
that is not to he underestimated — as bj 
M of tin- marvelous quality of tin' 
wood lie employs, the famous Oregon 
mountain yew. The bows used t'm' gen- 
erations past by European archers have 
in almost every instance been made of 
yew wood, usually of Spanish or Italian 
origin. Some years ago Mr. Barnes, who 
has been interested in archery practically 
all his life, discovered the adaptability 
of the Oregon yew for bow-moking pur- 
poses. Indeed, the wood found in the 
high altitudes of the mountains of our 
North Pacific coast is much finer grain- 
ed and superior in every way to any- 
thing obtainable in the forests of the 
old world. Mr. Barnes, in addition to 
drawing upon an important new 
source id' supply, has. after long experi- 
ment, developed a new method of sea 
sonine. and treating the wood, which is 
revolutionary in its radical departure 
from accepted practice abroad, and i- 
claimed to he responsible for the pro- 
duction of long bows that are in many 
respects a distinct advance over the out- 
put of the best known English and con- 
tinental bow-makers. 



COLLAPSIBLE MINNOW TRAP. 

\\>- are in receipt of a descriptive 
booklet from A. J. Algate, Toronto, 
Can., in connection with a new minnow 
catcher. The device is known as Al- 
- Collapsible Minnow-Trap, and. 
as the name implies, this new trap can 
be folded into very small space. 

Undoubtedly, there is a great need for 
>omethine of this nature and many 
lit - have been made to produi 

satisfactory and effective device for the 
purpose, hut thru 

doubtful fh' gla trap have al 

.1 i .hi C€ of t i i . 1 1 1 . ] i a nil ;n 



while the wire outfits are altogether 

ioo bulk] to ever become popular. 

This new device is made of transpar- 
ent celluloid— thus affording the neces- 
sarj transparency and aerviceableness; 
it is most simple in its construction 
and requires but the fraction of a 
minute to unpack and set. When not in 
t folds up and can be carried in the 
1 1 .ase. 

It will be seen in mi Fig. 1, in the 
accompanying illustrations, that the 
<le\ ice is triangular. Three small inde- 
pendent pieces set on springs at either 
end form the funnels, and as the lower 
section works free from the others, it 
is merely necessary to compress same 
to recover the entire catch at one 
operation (Fig. 2). Then, too, the tri- 
angular formation enables its quick re- 
i -o\ ery from the water. 

Its compactness, as shown in Fig. 3, 
will appeal \cr\ strongly to every fish- 
erman, as every extra square inch and ev- 
ery additional ounce means much on the 
last half mile of a heart-breaking port- 
age. The trap when folded in case actu- 
ally measures I6fx6jjxli| in. and weighs 
t went y-eight ounces. 

There is no question but that Mr. Al- 







1 \z. 2. 

gate has produced an article, of superior 
merit -something which will meet the 
popular approval of the fishing fratern- 
ity. It is unique in its simplicity and 
compactness, and being made of cellu- 
loid will undoubtedly stand all kinds of 
rough usage. The traps are constructed 
from the best of materials, and will 
certainly be a valuable addition to the 
sportsman's kit. They retail in Canada 
at $3.50 each. Descriptive booklet and 
prices to the trade may be obtained bj 
addressing A. J. Algate, 98 King Street 
West, Toronto, Can. 



TWO KINDS OF AMMUNITION. 

"There are two kinds of cartrii 
..n the market," remarked a manufac- 
turer of ammunition, "one of which is 
p,r hunters and the other for those who 
only think they are hunters. Lei me 
tell you an incident illustrating v hal I 

34 



mean: A rich New Yorker who owns 
a preserve in the Adirondack moun- 
tains invited a number of friends up to 
hunt with him. One of them acted as 
if be had never seen a gun before. He 
shot .me of the guides in the lee, the first 
morning. The next day he had wretched 
luck. Bang, hang, went his gun, but he 
had hit nothing. He was much embar- 
rassed. It seemed, too. that at each one 
■ if the misses the guides smiled al one 
another oddly. Finally his cartridges 
gave out. He hurried to the nearest 
guide and demanded more. 'There ain't 
no more, sir," the man answered. 'No 
more? Nonsense. Why. you've got at 
least a thousand in that box.' The man 
blushed and stammered: 'Ah. but them 
ain't for you, sir; they're for another 
gent. They've got shot in 'em. sir. ami 
I can 't let you use 'em.' " 



HANGING GLASS SHELF. 
An exceedingly convenient and prac 

Heal window display method is descrih 
ed herewith, showing how a glass shelf 
may be hung in the window for the dis- 
play of various kinds of sporting ^i»»s 
The supports for this shelf are made id' 
small chain; nickel or brass may be 
used or some less attractive article may 
he covered with cloth or crepe paper. 
The chains are attached to hooks in the 
ceiling and at the bottom run through 
short pieces of pipe, forming supports 
which should also be enclosed in the nn 
ering material. On the two supports 
thus contrived the shelf is suspended, 
being, of course, cut the proper length 
and width and made of good, substan- 
tial plate glass for best effect. The ad- 
vantage of such a shelf is not only the 
ease with which it may be put up or 
taken down, but also the fact that il 
offers scarcely any obstruction to tin- 
view and affords a bright background 
for articles displayed. 



A GERMAN EXPERIMENT. 

German military authorities are ex- 
perimenting with a device by which the 
location of troops using smokeless pow- 
der may be easily discovered. By I his 
device it is proposed to survey the land- 
scape through pale red glasses. The Mash 




Fig. 3. 

of smokeless powder appears strong in 
red light, while ordinary objects are 
dimmed. By furnishing field glasses 
with the device in question, which is pro 
vided with screens of the proper tint, 
the position of concealed marksmen can 
be detected. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE TRADE GOSSIP 



plant i- to be Installed 

MM, III ||. 



during 



Quebec. 

C. 0. Jervas, of St. John, N.B., was 
in Montreal last week. 

Mr. Cuzner, of McDougall ivj Cu/.nn , 
hardware merchants, Ottawa, died last 

Week 

E. W. McCarty, general agent, New 
York City, has been calling on the 
trade in Montreal. 

J. II. Koper, manufacturers' agent, 
Montreal, is spending a month in the 
Maritime Provinces. 

E. C. Budge, of the order department 
of Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal, is 
away on his vacation. 

J. Fred Booth, son of J. R. Booth 
the lumber king, Ottawa, spent a few 
days last week in Montreal. 

C. K. Cummings, of the Shelby Steel 
Tube Co., Pittsburg, Pa., is spending a 
tew weeks in Montreal on business. 

L. I). Robertson, representing (he 

Comet Motor Co., Montreal, sailed 
this week for Europe on the. Empress 
of Ireland. 

Mr. Hahn, of the Hahn Brass Co., 
New Hamburg, Ont., was in Montreal 
last week representing the interests of 
his company. 

Mr. Newman, manager of the Winni- 
peg branch of Caverhill, Learmont & 
Co., Montreal, is spending a short time 
in the latter city. 

F. Wilkinson, secretary of B. & S 
II. Thompson & Co., Montreal, is spend- 
ing a few days this week at the rifle 
meet near Montreal. 

R. E. Thorne, of the Canadian Bronze 

Powder Works, Montreal, is spending a 
month in Western Canada combining 
business with pleasure. 

It will be noted with interest by 
hardware men that a representative of 
their profession in the person of 0. C 
Kelley, of Lewis Bros., Montreal, dis- 
tinguished himself last week at the 
canoe meet in Montreal, by winning the 
senior singles championship. 

R. B. Coulson, of the Dominion Wire 
Manufacturing Co., Montreal, who under- 
went an operation recently, is recovering 
rapidly, and expects to be able to leave 
the hospital in a few days. It will be 
some weeks before lie can resume his 
duties on the road. 

Ontario. 

Thomas Marshall, hardware, merchani , 
JHmnville, was in Toronto last week. 

C. Kerouock, hardware merchant, 
L'Orignal, Ont., has assigned to G. H. 
Pharnand. 

Brickman & Orman, plumbers, Strat- 
ford, Ont., have been succeeded by 
Brickman & St oil. 

Walter Garner, of the hardware firm 
of Garner Bros., Niagara Falls, spent 
Tuesday in Toronto. 

Mr. Russel, of the Georgian Bay Lum- 
ber Co., Wauhaushene, Ont., was in To- 
ronto last Saturday. 

W. J. McCluig, plumber. Port Hope, 
Ont., recently had his premises and 
stock damaged by fire. 

The hardware store and stock of 
Richardson <V Co., North Ba\ Onl 
recently destroyed bv (ire 

J. N. Rowan head bookkcepei lm 
Frankel Bros , dealers in old ie 



has left for a fortnight's vacation. Mi 
Frankel will spend a week at Preston 
and a week at Niagara Falls, Ont. 

Fied Donnell, Ravenshoe, and Charles 
Hall, Trafalgar, Ont., hardware mer- 
chants, spent Wednesday in Toronto. 

Herbert King, at present with fcht 
Russell Hardware Co., Toronto, leave 
in a few days to seek his fortune in the 
west. 

R. G. Swalwell, harness dealer, Rip 
ley, Ont., has assigned to R. I). VfcKen- 
y.ie. A meeting of creditors will be held 
on August lflth. 

A five hundred light ascetylene gas 
plant has been purchased by II. W. 
Brown, hardware merchant, Plattsville, 
which will be used to illuminate the 
majority of the business places and 
many of the private houses in that 
town. 

Gerald Davison, formerly with the 
\ dkes Hardware Co., Toronto, and a1 
present with G. A. Richardson, hard 
ware merchant, Ouelph, Ont., will 
leave shortly for Edmonton, Alt-'.., 
where he will seek a position in the 
same line. 

II. F. Mcintosh iv Co., manufacturers' 
agents and Canadian representatives of 
the Buffalo Manufacturing Co., makers 
of cooking and table ware, have moved 
to new quarters at 51 Yonge street, 
Toronto, where a full line of sample:, 
are on display. 

Charles Penfold, of the hardware firm 
of S. & G. Penfold, Ouelph, Ont., was 
a caller at the Toronto office of lard 
ware and Metal on Friday. Mr. Pen 
fold was on his way home after spend- 
ing an enjoyable fortnight's vacation in 
the Niagara peninsula. 

Western Canada. 

Hammill & Featherston, hardware 
merchants, Nanton, Alta., have dis 
solved partnership. 

J. B. Wright, hardware merchant. 
Midale, Sask., has sold out his hard- 
ware business to Mr. Purdy. 

Isaac, Saunders, Calgary, Alta . has 
sold his interest in the Calgary Sad 
dleiv Co. to W. A. Johnson of the same 
city'. 

Fire did considerable damage recently 
to the stock and premises of Heath >.v. 
Howard, hardware merchants, Vermili 
on, Alta, 

I. G. Doonan & Co., hardware mer- 
chants, Swift Current, Sask., have sold 
out their business to the Greal North- 
ern .Supply Co. 

The hardware and furniture firm of 
Stringer & Bennett, Rocanville, Sask.. 
have been succeeded h\ the firm of 
Stringer & Thurston. 

The Manitoba Rolling .Mills Co., Win- 
nipeg, are now manufacturing bai iron 
in good quantities. Their plant has been 
m operation for nearly a month. 

The hardware firm of Lundy & Me 
Leod. Edmonton. Alta.. have admitted 
W. D. Smith into partnership and the 
firm will henceforth be stvled Lundv, 

Mcleod & Co. 

The Vuli u mi Works., Winnipeg, 

to instal a galvaniz 

p] mt for tin tt i ieg ( lal > anizing 

and Mahufai tui inc ' Thi 

IS 



Maritime Provinces. 

T. P. Calkin & Co. have established 
a plumbing, heating and Bheei metal 

business at Keutsvillc. VS. under Ihe 

managemeni of Lewis c. Fllis. 

The hardware establishment of A E 

Alexander & Co., Campbclllon, N.P.. was 

broken into a fortnight ago by a couple 

of burglars. Charles Alexander was 

awakened by the burglar alarm and be 

and his brot her-in-la w ran to the store. 

The burglars tried to make their escape 

but they were pounced upon and after a 
struggle, lasting about twenty minutes, 
were reduced to submission and taken 

to the lock-up. 

FREIGHT RATES COME DOWN. 

Alter some months of careful con- 
sideration, the members of the Domin- 
ion Board of Railway Commissioners 
have issued an order which will have a 
Par-reaching effect on the commerce of 
the Dominion east of the great lakes. 

The order remedies the lone stani 
complaint of Ontario and eastern Can- 
ada shippers thai the railways discrini 
male in favor of through traffic from 
I he United States to eastern Canada 
points as compared with traffic origin- 
ating on this side of the border, and 
puts into effect the principle of uni- 
form rates for equal distances. As a 
result. I here will be a marked reduc- 
tion of freighl rates to the east from 
practically all points in western On- 
tario, the existing unfair discrimination 
will be done away with, ami shipper- 
and the public generally will greatly 
benefit. 

fhe change will make a difference of 
several cents in connection with all 
points. Another feature is that the 
"owner's risk" condition has been 
dropped, according to the order, 
against some 250 items. 



VALUES IN WASTE. 

These are days when all waste mallei 

is utilized for something oi other, bul 
Few people realize what a greal busi 

it is. Waste paper-, as everybody knoWs, 
is gathered and sold to be re-made. In 
the office buildings of Philadelphia all 
paper taken from the waste basket is 
gathered into a bin in the cellar. In one 
of the buildings its monthly sale nets 
$150, enough to pay the chief engineer. 
In most of the buildings, however, the 
engineers are allowed to profit by the 
sale of the paper, and each generally 
makes a tidv sum every month. 



MILITARY OR CAMP STOVE, 

W. B. Kimmel, Boise, Idaho, has 
invented a stove which is especially de- 
signed for military or camping uses. 
The object of the invention is to provide 
a stove strong, light, and durable, and 
which can be packed into a small com- 
pass by placing certain parts within 
othei parts. The oven is adapted for 
cooking of food through chambers for 
iin circylat ion of bo " om the 

Hie 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware*™ Metal 

Established ..... 1888 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 



JOH> BAY>E MACLEAN 



President 



Publishers ol Trade Newspapers which circulate in 

the Provinces of British Columbia. Albert. i. Saskat- 
chewan, Manitoba. Ontario. Quebec Nova Scotia. 
New Brunswick. P.B. Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal. 
Toronto 
Winnipeg. 
LONDON, Eng 

Chicago, III. 



offii 

233 McGill Street 

Telephone Mail 

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511 L*nion Bank Building 

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J. Meredith McKim 

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Subscription. Canada and L'nited States. $2.00 
Great Britain, 8s. 6d.. elsewhere - 12a 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address { ')f cnpt - \f™ZSl 
I. Adscript, Canada 



NEW TERMS OF PAYMENT. 

Much laxity has existed in dealing 
with the recognized terms of payment 
in use amongst tho.se engaged in the 
\.i rious branches of the hardware trade, 
and it was inevitable thai the advant- 
taken by many jobbers and retail- 
ers would ultimately result in a tight- 
ening up of the terms allowing dis- 
counts for payments of accounts within 
a specified time. 

The action of the American Hard- 
ware .Manufacturers' Association at its 
convention in .June at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, in adopting a resolution calling 
more stringent observance of the 
conditions of payment does not come as 
a surprise. therefore, and, ta.kcn in 
conjunction with the general tightening 
in the money market, will undoubtedly 
result in a closer observance of the 
clearly delined rules under which the 
average purchases of goods are made 
The practice of taking discounts where 
really earned will also, in conse- 
quence, be checked 

The resolution adopted reads as fol- 
lows : 

' Whereas, the terms of payment of a 
proportion of our members pro- 
vide a cash discount if paid within a 
stated period, and, whereas, sometimes 
in the past Hie cash discount has been 
allowed when remittances have not 
been received by the seller within Hie 
agreed period ; hence some buyers have 
not regarded it necessary to conform to 
Hie terms stipulated, and this laxity 
has resulted in disadvantage to all 
Resolved, thai the association urges all 
members 1o refuse to allow cash dis- 
eount unless Hie remittances are strid 
Iv in accordance with the terms of pur- 
'•'1. thai II la ""I suffi- 



cient excuse for allowing cash discount 
after the prescribed limit has expired 
because the goods have not reached des- 
tination Resolved, that it is under- 
Ch member will report to the 
secretary any violation of these resolu 
tions for such action as is deemed ad 
visable, ami resolved, that all members 
are requested to send a copy of these 
resolutions to their customers." 



REGAINED HIS SIGHT. 

Charles \V. Creed, secretary of he 
Maritime Hoard of Trade, is one of 
Canada's grand old men of bush 
'I he Maritime Hoard has demo'nstl 
u-- usefulness as an organization of 
business men for the general advantage 
of Canada, as Parliament says, and its 




CHAS. W. CREED. 

success is in no small degree due to the 
enthusiastic, intelligent and self-sacri- 
ficing efforts put forth by Mr. Creed as 

the secretary and (one might well add) 
manager. 

Writing last week to a member of the 
MacLean staff, Mr. Creed said : "I en- 
tered on my 7b'th year on 22nd -July, 
and am pleased to say my health is 
excellent. I have been wearing glasses 
for the past 25 years, but on Feb. 13th 
of this year my sight suddenly returned 
and 1 can now both read and write 
without them. This is to me a great 
comfort." 

Air. Creed is a remarkable man, and 
readers of Hardware and Metal every- 
where will join with this paper in wish- 
ing him many more years of health and 
usefulm 



MAY HAVE SOLVED IT. 

A South Dakota firm who have 
wrestled with the problem of cash VS. 
eiedit have formulated a plan by which 
they hope to increase their business and 
still be able to accommodate their eus- 

36 



tomers who are short of cash— at the 
same time protecting themselves anil 
taking advantage of ever) available op- 
portunity to buy goods right. 

Here is their plan: "Notes for small 

amounts ami chattel mortgages for 
large amounts, both bearing interest. 
Special 10 per cent, added on all bar- 
gain table goods sold on security. Cash 
takes anything in the store at bargain 
prices." 

There are many merchants who could 
not adopt this plan and there are others 
who might, do it with profit. That it is 
right and proper that debtors should 
give notes bearing interest is unques- 
tionable. It is the basis of all financial 
operations not immediately settled in 
cash— and where the buyer asks the 
merchanl to carry him for an indefinite 
length of time the latter has a perfect 
right to insist on security. 



THE ODD PRICE QUESTION. 

Business men are quick and expert in 
detecting human weaknesses and in 
making use of them to the full. Twenty- 
five or thirty years ago all goods were 
sold at an even price of 5c, 25c, $1.00, 
$3.00 or $5.li(i, etc., and odd prices 
were seldom marked on goods, mer 
chants having apparently a horror of 
"making change," pennies and coppers 
being seldom used. 

Departmental stores were quick to 
sec the deluding power of marking 25c 
goods at 23c., $3. no goods at $2.98, 
$5.00 goods at $4.08, and so on. Shop- 
pers, especially women, jumped at the 
conclusion that 25c goods were cheap 
at 23c. and the departmental stores 
were jammed with bargain hunters, 
who had rather peculiarly forgotten 
about the 10c car fare they Were 
spending to gain 2c on a bargafn. 

People dearly love to set a bargain 
and one of the regular duties 'the house 
wife assiduously performs every even- 
ing is to search the evening papers for 
$2.98 hats, 08c wall paper, etc. It is 
rather inhuman for the big merchant to 
impose upon the morbid bargain ap- 
petite of the public. However, that is 
their own business. 

The country merchant has never 
adopted this clever though perhaps pre- 
carious device. He has tenaciously 
clung to the idea of even prices 'or 
everything to save time in making 
change. There are numerous articles in 
a country store which should in all 
fairness to the dealer, he marked up lc . 
2c, 3c, or 4c They .vou'd be sur- 
prised at the increase in profits 1! thc-v 
would dispel the illusion they have been 
laboring under for so many years, and 
mark their goods to the cent. We have 
not the slightest doubt it would pa) 
them and we strongly urge them to do 
so. The merchant, has a perfect right 
to all he can make. 



If \ R D W A R E \ \ 1) MET A !. 



their worst Uhey begin iu mend, we 
may confidently look for some improve 
meal in bhe nexl fortnight. We continue 
to quote : Lamb, Qag and straits a1 $44. 

Shee1 Zdnc— Is weak. 

Lead— Is strengthening and prices are 
firmer. Supplies are adequate. 

old Materials— The market is si ill 
quiet and it expected to continue so to) 
a fortnight yet. Prices are weak and a 
still i u 1 1 lit- 1 decline is noted on some 

lines We qUOte I lea\ J coppei and 

wire, !'>'., light copper, [5c; heavy rod 
brass, 15c; light brass, 8c; No. 1, 
wrought iron, $15.50; stove plate, 
$12.00. 



TORONTO METAL MARKETS. 

Toronto, August 15.— The metal trade 
continues quiet, with no outstanding 
features in the local market. Business 
has not yet recovered from the mid- 
summer quietness which has prevailed 
for the past three or four weeks, and, 
consequently, Toronto prices are still 
declining. While no heavy sales are re- 
ported, a good sorting-ordei business 
is, however, being done and local job- 
bers are getting as much business as 
I be] expect for the middle of August, 
when the metal markets are usually 
dull. 

Antimony — The local market is ex- 
tremely dull with practically nothing 
doing. Antimony prices have taken 
another drop of two cents during the 
week and Coojkson's is now quoted 
locally at 15c. and llallett's at l'Hc. 
There is little doing on the American 
or London markets, and prices are a 
shade easier on account of the con- 
tinued dullness. 

Pig Iron — The market here continues 
very quiet, with prices unchanged. A 
few enquiries continue to arrive but 
these are almost exclusively for iron in 
suiting quantities. 

Tin— A sharp decline has taken place 
during the week and lamb, (lag and 
straits ingot tin is now quoted locallv 
from $42 to $44, as against $44 to *45 
last week. Little buying or selling is 
being done and supplies are quite ade- 
quate for present needs. Concerning the 
American market the improved demand 
of the last few days shows that sonic 
consumers there are beginning to reckon 
with the decline, and are considering 
the advisability of taking advantage of 
present prices. Records show that 
since the first of the month the London 
price of spot tin has declined over £12 
per ton, and the New York price has de- 
clined very nearly three cents per 
pound. 

Lead— Since the decline of last week 
there has been no further change in 
lead and local prices for imported pig 
lead remain very firm at $5.35. 

Copper— A further decline of Uc. took 
place during the week and casting ingot 
copper is now quoted here at 22e. Cop- 
per decidedly furnishes the most inter- 
esting feature in the world's < markets al 
present. A well-versed Boston writer 
sums up the' American market as fol- • 
lows: "The repeated declarations of 
the big copper producers thai there will 
be no further reduction in prices is hav- 
ing little effect with purchasers, for if 
was but a short time ago that these 
same producers announced that under 
no consideration would there be any cut. 
They declared that the market was 
thoroughly sound and there was abso- 
lutely no occasion for any reduction in in 



the prices. It is now getting to be a 

ol anol bei cut oi uo sales, wi1 1 
prospeel good for a large accumulal ion 
of the surplus metal n bhe present attj 
bude of the producers is adhered bo 
Ureadj rumours are currenl thai many 
of bhe larger companies are begin 

lo pile up i hit copper, although natur- 
ally there is no othcial confirmation ol 
this rumour. These large producing in- 
terests are, by reason ol their Strong 
financial condition, in a position io hold 
out for a long time aj&ainsl bhe demands 
of consumers toi turthei concessions, 
but it is doubt till it the) will considei 
M a wise policy to do' so. A 20-cent 
copper market may not be a pleasing 
thing to contemplate, aitei the long 
continued period of high prices, but it 
surely begins to look as if this level— 
and possibly a lower one— must be 
reached before anj considerable fresh 
demand for the metal is stimulated." 

old Materials— Are still declining lo- 
cally and the market continues very 
weak. Heavy copper and wire has de- 
clined l£e. and is now quoted at 15c; 
light copper and heavy rod brass have 
each dropped 2c. and are now 13c; 
beavj yellow brass has dropped from 
12c. to lUAc, and light brass from 8c. 
to i;*c; tea lead is now 4±c. instead of 
lc, and heavy lead has lost .Jc. and is 
now quoted at lc., scrap zinc is also £c. 
easier and now brings 3fc. 



LONDON METAL MARKETS. 

London, Aug. 13.— Cleveland warrants 
are quoted at 57s. lid.^ and Glasgow 
standards at 56s. Gu., making prices as 
compared with last week, on Cleveland 
warrants l^d. lower, and on Glasgow 
standards 3d. lower. 

Tin.— Spot tin opened weak at £168 
15s., futures at £108 5s'., and after 
sales of 250 tons of spot and 250 tons 
of futures closed weak at £107 10s. for 
spot and £167 10s. for futures, making 
price as compared with last week £11 
lower on both spot and futures. 

Copper.— Spot copper opened weak at 
£78 5s., futures at £75 5s., and after 
sales of 200 tons of spot and 700 tons 
of futures, closed weak at £70 10s. for 
spot and £73 10s. for futures, making 
price as compared with last week £7 
10s. lower on spot and £7 5s. lower on 
futures. 

Spelter. — The market closed at £22, 
making price as compared with last 
week 12s. 6d. lower. 

Lead.— The market closed at £19 15s., 
making price as compared with last 
week I2s. 6d. higher. 



U.S. METAL MARKETS. 
Cleveland, 0., Aug. 15.— The Iron 
Trade Review to-day says : 

''Conditions in the iron market have 
been very quiet during the past week 
and an anxious eye has been turned in 
the direction of the New York stock 
market to see what, effect, if any, it will 
have upon the situation. The last pre- 
vious flurry came in the height of the 
buying movement, when new business 
was being received from every direction, 
and the halt it occasioned was but mo- 
mentary. At this time tnere is practi- 
cally no new business, as compared with 
the former occasion, but it is not 
thought the effect of the heavy stock 
fluctuations will be, or should be, taken 
as an indication of still further decline 
limitations. With the light new buy- 



ing the pressure foi deliveries continues 
unabated in most lines, and, a fai a 
can be learned, there have been no 
cellat ions and but very tew request 

suspensions. 

"In nearly all poinl • of difference be 
tween the amalgamated association and 
the manufacl urn-, of "bar iron, 1 1 
conciliation boards decided m favoi ol 
the employes Manufacture) > ■ nol 

bound to accept the decision of the 
board, but will probably do so. 

Following a long period oi unprece 
dented demand, fall business in wire and 
wire nails has opened about a month 
earlier than usual, and mills, which are 
practically destitute of stocks, are ex- 
ceedingly busy. The very encouraging 
crop reports, recently issued, are favor- 
able for the wire business. 

I'bc [Uinois and Carnegie steel com- 
panies now have on hand orders for 40,- 
000 tons of plates and shapes for boat 
construction and instruction for ship- 
ping- nearly 60,000 tons of steel bars and 
shapes for implement manufacturers. 
Bridge builder-, are also placing new 
orders freely and the general demand for 
structural material is strong. In New 
Fork bids for 15,000 tons for piers have 
been submitted in addition to lb. 000 
tons recently contracted and II 000 
more are to be awarded late) 

U. S. IRON AND METAL MARKETS. 

New Fork, Aug. 15. — The Iron Age 
to-day says: " Koiiiidrvmcn, large and 
small, seem to persist in the policy of 
keeping oul of the market, and even the 
largest inciters are buying only from 
week to week for prompt deliveries. They 
are encouraged in their course by con- 
stantly lower prices in some sections. In 
oilier districts, notably the south, the 
makers are clinging to the prices which 
have prevailed for a considerable time. 
but they are not making any sales, and 
in some competitive markets are dollars 
above the asking prices of other pro- 
ducers. 

In steel making irons interest centres 
entirely oh basic iron, which is weaker. 
Aside from one lot of 5,000 Ions in the 
east, no business is reported, but it is 
more than probable that a buying move- 
ment in this branch of the iron trade 
will set in during the next few weeks in 
the district easl of the Allegheny moun- 
tains. 

There has been no further buying of 
steel by the leading interest since last 
week. 

While steel works and rolling mills 
have assurances of full work for the 
balance of (lie year, and while they are 
crowded now. if is undeniable that on 
the whole new orders are coming in at 
a considerably reduced rate, so that the 
winter may find a slackening of opera- 
tions necessary. 

The deliveries of galvanized sheets 
are still unsatisfactory, the mills being 
overcrowded. Tn black sheets, however, 
the situation is improving. Thus far 
the season's business in tin plates has 
been a disappointment. 

There is no sign as yet that the large 
consumers of copper are tempted to buy, 
although small lots of electrolytic have 
sold at 18 cents. 



39 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Travelers. hardware merchants and 
clerk* are requested to forward corres- 
pondence regarding the doings ol the 
trade and the industrial gossip ol their 
town and district. Addressed envelopes, 
stationery, etc.. will he supplied to regu- 
lar correspondents on request. Write 
the Editor lor information. 



HALIFAX HAPPENINGS. 

Halifax, August 12. — The annual meet- 
1 the Maritime Board of Trade will 
beheld at St. John, N.B., tins year, 
the opening session being un Wednesday , 
August 21st. li is expected bhat the 
attendance of delegates will be large, 
as a number ol important subjects are 
io be considered. Secretarj c. M. 
ureed has just issued a circular show- 
ing the many important questions to 
be discussed, some of whieh are as fol- 
lows : 

The importance of double-tracking the 
Intercolonial Railway between Halifax 
and St. John, N.B. 

The need ol increased transportation 
facilities, engines, freight cars and pas 
senger ears lor the Intercolonial Kail- 

The importance of the founding of a 
School or University of Technology 
that will have the support of the three 
.Maritime Provinces. 

Abrogation Modus Vivendi. 

Appointment of a Canadian Atlantic 
Fisheries Board. 

olution endorsing recommendation 
of colonial conference for fast line to 
the Orient through Canada. 
nus to steel shipbuilding. 

Running rights of the C.P.R. and 
other railways over the Intercolonial 
Railway through Nova Scotia to Syd- 
nev. 

Federal and local subsidies for steam- 
ship service between Sydney, ports in 
Bras d'Or Lakes on Inverness shore and 
Chariot tetown and Summerside. 

The necessity of an export duty on 
rossed pulp wood. 

A national banking system for Canada. 

The desirability "of permanent high 
roads between counties and provinces. 

Encouragement of sheep raising, 
osed good roads. 

ouragement of trade between Cana- 
la and the British West Indies. 

Maritime union. 

Development of our national resources. 

National system of technical educa- 
tion. 

Re-affirmation of the tunnel resolu- 
ion. 



SCENIC ST. JOHN. 

St. John, N.B., Aug. 12.— Business in 
he hardware line has been very good 
atelv although it is naturally the quiet 
eason. The demand for builders' hard 
vare continues brisk and smallvvares arc 
aeetin^ with a ready sale. 



Emerson & Fisher's big hardware es- 
ablishment on Germain Street was in 

: last week bv the Red Rose Tea 
from all over Canada, who 

meeting here in annual convention. 



The big, seven-story brick building was 
examined from top to bottom and the 
firm was Lrreath congratulated on the 
fine appearance of their up-to-date es 
tablishment and the methodical waj In 

which they conducted the various de- 
part ments. 



The New Brunswick Cold Storage 
Companj was organized at a meeting 
held here on Thursday last and is an 
amalgamation of the provincial corn- 
pain, with the company now building 
the warehouse on Main Street, near the 
l.C.R. pier. The following officers weir 
elected: R. J. Graham, Belleville, Ont., 
president; George McAvity, St. John. 
vice-president; J. S. Macoun, Ottawa, 
secretarj treasurer; II. R. Koss, Sussex, 
and A. 1. Truemau. St. John, directors. 

The company will proceed with the 
building of the warehouses, now being 
erected at a cost of $125,000, aud will 
operate under the provincial charter 
granted to the New Brunswick com- 
pany. 



Justice John Barnett, of Hartland, 

will this week, al the instance of the 
village lire commissioners, hold an in- 
vestigation into the origin of the fire 
of July lf> under the act providing for 
such cases, lion. 11. A. Mckeow n, of St. 
John, will handle the case for the com- 
missioners. 

* * 
* 

Not for many years has there been so 
much water in the river during the 
summer season. At Fredericton a fresh- 
et of nine feel is reported, and the lum- 
bermen have taken full advantage to 
make a clean-up of logs. The rafting 
operations this year are likely to be 
more successful than for many years 
past. If the lumbermen are happy, how- 
ever, the farmers are correspondingly 
gloomy, for the wet weather has de- 
stroyed great quantities of hay. If fine 
weather does not soon come, the farm- 
ers will suffer heavy loss. It is likely 
that the C.P.R. will bring one of their 
floating elevators here this winter to 
iisr in connection with the new wharf 
on the west side, as there will not be 
time to erect a conveyer from the ele- 
vator. 



KINGSTON KINETOSCOPE. 

Kingston, Aug. 12. — McKehey & 
Birch, hardware merchants, have moved 
into their new premises on Brock street. 
built in place of the building recently 
destroyed by fire, and have now one of 
I he best equipped stores of its kind to 
be found in these parts. They have add- 
ed another storey to the old slore. mak- 
ing it a four-storey building, whereas the 
other was only three. The additional 

Storey will be used to keep (heir reserve 

stock of enameled ware and all lines of 

lighter g Is. generally handled in the 

hardware trade. The hardware business 
has been well represented by this firm 

for the pasl forty years and there is 
hardly a more progressive house than 
this in the city. They carry a full line 
of general hardware, both shelf and 
hea'vv goods, the quality being always 
first class, selected from the best markets 
in Canada and Hie Slales. The store 

40 



shows good arrangement and everything 
about ii is well planned ; they occupj a 

large Boor space, which enables them lo 
show goods lo the besl advantage. The 
customer is always given the most court- 
eons atttention h\ competent salesmen. 
In connection with their business they 
have also a w ell-litted-up tinshop, as 
well as a plumbing, gas and steam-fitting 
department next door to the hardware, 
where all plumbing is scientifically and 
carefully done. The tinsmithing depart- 
ment is one of the best, the highest or- 
der of work being turned out. aud y/iws 
employment to a Large number of men. 
The members of (lie linn are men of 
sterling Worth, and men who rank high 
in commercial circles. 



Dr. Waugh, dentist, and E. S. Su.1- 
dard, grocer, both of this city, have pur- 
chased a plant for the manufacture of 
cement blocks for building purposes, and 
will commence operations at once. 



The Knox Company are going to open 
one of their 5c, 10c. and ].">c. stores in 
Kingston, in tin' store recently occupied 
by George Wills & Co.. hatters. They 
have had carpenters and workmen busy 
fitting up the store for the past few 
weeks and will open as soon as the work 
is completed. Robinson & Copley are 
doing the carpentering. 



.lames McGrath, of this city, has been 
awarded the contract for rebuilding the 
Roman Catholic church, at Sharbot Lake. 
This edifice was destroyed by fire last 
spring. Architect 11. P. Smith has re- 
duced the size of the church, as a smaller 
building would suffice, owing to the first 
contract juice being too high. 



The city engineer's department began 
the asphalt construction work to-day. 
A number of crossings are to be laid 
throughout the city, and quite a lot of 
patch-work has to be done on walks and 
crossings, which have been torn up by 
the gas excavations. 



The people made good use of their 
screen doors and windows on Sunday. 
and many id' them stayed away from 
I heir houses as much as possible, it be- 
iug one id' the hottest days experienced 
this summer. The thermometer register- 
ed about eighty-two degrees in the shade. 
ivhicb is considered awfully hot in King- 
ston, though many a place would con- 
sider itself lucky to have such a moder- 
ate temperature. The hot weather should 
be relished, however, as there won't be 
a great many warm nights like that of 
Sunday now, as the autumn is fast ap- 
proaching. 

* * 
* 

George Mills & Co., hatters ami l'\w< 
liens, have purchased a store on Princess 
street, Great alterations have been made 



ttARDW \ R R \XD M fe t A L 



and they have now a much larger store 
1 1 1 : ■ 1 1 before. James Balliday, electri- 
cian, had the contract for lighting and 
fixtures, and made an excellent joh of 
the work. Besides placing a number of 
lights in each window, they have placed 
about forty lights in the doorway, which 
shows the store u|» fine from the outside. 
The} have glass cases along the walls on 
either side of the storCj as well as lights 
along Hie top of these eases, the length 

of the store. It is expected, now Mr. 

Mills has started the outside electrical 
sign lighting, thai other merchants will 
follow in his footsteps and take advan- 
tage of the Cheaper rates offered by the 
city for outside lighting; when one 

starts, other usually follow. 



.1. B. W'alkem. assignee for <i ge 

Sears, hardware merchant, has called 
lenders for the estate and stock in trade 

of the above mentioned, consisting of 

shelf and heavy hardware, paints, oils. 
etc., and a large assortment of other 
goods usually carried in a hardware 
business. The stock is valued at $16,000. 
Tenders will he received by the assignee 
until the 23rd of August. 



Arthur Ellis, architect, is having a 
fine brick house erected in one of the 
besl residential parts of the city. Work- 
men have been at the building for some 
lime, and Mr. Ellis expects to have it 
completed in the course id' a mouth, so 
as to he able to move into it in the fall. 



\Y. B. Dalton, hardware merchant, left 
with his wife one day last week for Old 
Orchard beach, where they will remain 
during the month of August. 



The sloop Granger arrived here on 
Thursday with a cargo of cement from 
Belleville, for John Lemmon & Sons. 



The Grand Trunk Railway Company 
has no intention of purchasing the Tete 
du Pont barrackSj and the rumor of their 
purchase has since been contradicted. 
The work of reconstructing the buildings 
is to go on. The public works depart- 
ment has not yet returned the revised 
plans for tenders, but will do so shortly. 
The cost will be considerably reduced 1 so 
as to keep within the appropriation. 
The plans for further additions to Artil- 
lery park barracks have arrived for ap- 
proval by the eastern Ontario officer in 
command. They provide for alterations 
to the stable buildings, which w 7 ill he 
veneered and otherwise improved. 

The employes of the Canadian Loco- 
motive Works held a picnic at Lake On- 
lirio park on Saturday last in aid of the 
Hotel Dieu and general hospitals. The 
i'ay was an ideal one for the outing, and 
had the committee been given the mak- 
ing, a finer day could not have been se- 



cured. The mi e an all-day affair 

of il and people si reamed out from early 
morning until evening. Some of the 
sports were, football in the morning be 
t ween the Englishmen ami Scotchmen 
employed at the works, the teams being 
evenly matched, and the Englishmen 
winning the game and the prize ot one 
hundred cigars. At L.30 the other sports 
started, and there was ;i contesl I'" 
everybody — running races, long and high 
jumps, greasy pole, tug-ol'-war and oth- 
er Contests which called for show of 
strength. The main attraction was a 
baseball match between two city teams 
for a purse of $50. The jolly day was 
brought to a close by a dance in the 

pavilion after the show, the street oars 
being kept busy until nearly midnight 
bringing hack the crowds. A long list. 
of uames of the generous merchants of 
the city, who were kind enough to offer 
goods for prizes, amongst which are 
most of our leading hardwaremen, has 
been published. This was the first af- 
fair of this nature held by the men of 
the works and it was such a grand suc- 
cess that they intend making it an an- 
nual one. A goodly sum was realized. 



preferred this city. The inducements 

the city council were 

tallation ater and 

connection the companj to pa> the 

same rate foi water and yas as 

consume! 



The Belleville Tubular Axle v. 
have had to seek larger quartet owing 
to increased business. 



BOOMING BELLEVILLE. 

Belleville, Aug. 15. — No doubt many of 
the readers of Hardware and Metal will 
be pleased to know that Belleville is 
soon to have in operation another large 
and new industry in the shape of a 
brass foundry, work on which com- 
menced in real earnest, on Monday of 
this week. The works of the said indus- 
try will be situated in the centre of 
West Belleville, on a # splendid site. The 
building will be of brick and stone and 
will be 136x40 feet. George A. Bennett 
of this city is the contractor and build- 
er. The foundry, when completed, will 
be one of the best equipped of the kind 
between Toronto and Montreal, the 
company having plenty of capital be- 
hind the undertaking. The ouput will 
consist of brass fixtures of all kinds. 
There is said to be a splendid and grow- 
ind demand for the prospective products 
of the new factory, and a large number 
of orders have already been booked. 



The Belleville Rolling Mills can hardly 
keep up with the demand for horse- 
shoes, 50 kegs being shipped this week 
to one Hamilton firm. The mills are 
running night and day with the largest 
staff in their history. 



The company is capitalized at $100.- 
000 and the shares have been principal- 
ly taken up by local capitalists. It is 
said that H. ('. Hunt will be the man- 
ager of the concern and his long experi- 
ence with the Belleville Lock Works well 
qualifies him for the position. The new T 
building-, which will cost about $7,000. 
is expected to be ready for occupation 
about November 1 ; in the meantime the 
company have rented a building and 
will manufacture the necessary tools and 
equipment. A large staff will be employ- 
ed at the works as soon as operations 
begin. The promoters had excellent in- 
ducements to locate in other places but 

41 



LEAFY LONDON. 

London, August L4. — The destruction 
bj fire on Saturday last of the South 
Western Traction Company's car hams 
with live cars, the machine shop, oil 
house and winding room, is a serious 
blow to ih.it concern. The direct loss 
is covered by insurance, hut the com 
paay seriously sutlers indirectly through 
the stoppage of trallic over I lie line 
Thc.\ have been in full operation between 

this city and St. Thomas for ovei a 
year, and have their rails laid close In 
I'ort Stanley, but now they find bl 
selves with scarcely any rolling 
slock or machinery necessary to the 
running of the road at a season when 
they should be busiest. However, the 
men at the head of the company are 
energetic, enterprising fellows, and it 
may he taken for granted that as little 
tune as possible will be lost in getting 
things in running shape again. 



A dozen or so local contractors ha' c 
sent in tenders to the Grand Trunk Rail- 
way Company for the erection of the ad- 
dition which is to be made to the tar 
works on the east end. The building is 
to he of brick, and it is understood the 
lenders vary from $55,001) to $60,000. 
The addition will mean the doubling of 
the facilities for the building of freight 
cars and the employment of at least 
one hundred more men than at present. 
The Grand Trunk shops are already 
among London's chief industries, and 
when the addition is completed they 
will mean more than ever to the people 
of this city. As the tenders were sent 
to Montreal direct, an early announce- 
ment of the successful bidder may be 
looked for. 



J. E. McConnell, who for a number of 
years has been manager of the advertis- 
ing department of the McClary Manu- 
facturing Company, is about to sever 
his connection with that company, and 
will hereafter be more intimately con- 
nected with the advertising agency of 
the Ah Conncll-Ferguson Company, 
whose business has grown to such 
proportions as to demand Mr. McCon- 
nell's entire time and attention. The 
position of advertising manager for the 
McClary Company will be taken by A. 
A. Briggs, who for some years has been 
connected with the practical printing, ad- 
vertising and literary branches of sever- 
al of the leading journals of Toronto. 



Andrew R. Simpson, for the past 
eleven years manager of the Ontario 
Spring Bed & Mattress Compqtay, js re- 
tiring from the firm to seek a respite 
from business, in travel and change of 
scene. With his partner R. C. Williams, 
Mr. Simpson came to London a little 



H \KD W A K E A N H M ET \ I 



eleven years ago, ami the two 
tablished and extended the business 

situated at !'ti , » ork street, until now 
thaii goods air sold all oxer tin' Domin- 
ion and certain lines are sent out of the 
country. About forty hands are regular- 
ly employed, and a large sum is annual 
Ij paid out li, one ol 

.'. ing concei as and there is 
everj reason to believe it will continue 
to flourish 111 the future as it has in the 

part 



Hardware travelers have returned to 

the CO hi alter their two week.,' 

Hon. Trade docs not seem to have 
suffered to an] serious extent during 
their absence, business having been 
quite satisfactory right through. 



The annual picnic of the br&ss finish- 
ers at Port Stanley, Saturday, was a 
huge success. About 500 employes of 
Labatt's, the Empire, London Brass and 
the Mann Company works, took in the 
trip and enjoyed themselves immensely. 
The sports provided were good. 



CHAT FROM CHATHAM. 

Chatham, Auk- PC — Hardwarerneu re 
port the last week or two exceptionally 
good, business being quite in advance of 

last year. Merchants are clearing out 
their summer stocks, preparatory to 
making way for fall goods, which are 
now beginning to come in. 



Dresden ratepayers recently defeated 
bylaws lor a new school and street 
i>a\ ing. 



Recent press despatches state that ne- 
gotiations are in progress whereby the 
Windsor, Essex and Lake Shore Electric 
Railway may pass into the control of 
the Cataract Power Co., of Hamilton. 
The Windsor road holds a franchise for 
the city of Chatham, and its extension 
to this point was ultimately looked for. 
It is stated that the intention is to 
complete an all electric line from De- 
troit to Niagara, with an international 
across the Detroit River. 
iidenl Piggott, of this city, when 
interviewed regarding the matter, stated 
that the report in the Detroit paper was 
the first he had heard of it. 

The railway is reported to be pro- 
sing finely and the power house at 
Kingsville is rapidly nearing comple- 
tion. 



Blenheim's tax rate for the current 
year is 24 mills on the dollar, being one 
mill less than last year. The town 
council have granted the Blenheim and 
Kent Telephone Co. a franchise 
to place poles and wires on the streets, 
if a suitable agreement cannot be made 
with the Bell Company for the use of 
their poles. 



The Volunteer Firemen's Convention 
at Wallaceburg last week was a bier 
gathe tny being present from all 

parts of Ontario. The convention lasted 
two days, a third day being- taken up 
wit' 's tournament. The 



town was resplendent, the merchants 
decorating in a manner befitting the oc 
casion. 



Geo Watt Left on Saturday for To- 
ronto, where he has secured a position 

with the Doniinion Radiator Co. 



-■•lial ions are in progress between 

the Civic Industrial Committee and 

certain American capitalists which, it is 
hoped, may result in the landing of a 
new industry for the Maple City. The 
proposed concern will employ between 
60 and 70 hands, and Chairman West- 
man, while discreetly silent as to the 
pie. ise nature of the enterprise, is san- 
guine of success. 



Cortland 11. Payment, contractor, has 

made an assignment for the benefit of 

creditors, the assignee being Sheriff 

Gemmill. Sept. 4 is fixed a- the date of 

ibution. 



A party of Towanda, Pa., capitalists, 
interested in the C. W. & J;. E. electric 
road, were in the city fast week in- 
specting the work on the southern ex- 
tension. They expressed themselves as 
much gratified at the progress made. 
The line was opened to the fair grounds 
on Monday, Chatham's civic holiday, 
ears being run to the races. 



SASKATOON SAYINGS. 

Saskatoon, August 10, 1907.— The 
hardware store of James Clinkskill was 
broken into on Thursday night. The 
thieves gained entrance by a basement 
window. About $J.t> was taken from the 
cashier's drawer, besides stamps and a 
considerable quantity of goods, includ- 
ing cutlery, hnives, razors, hat pins, etc. 



On Thursday night the prize drawing 
tool: place at the Cairns store. As ten 
o'clock came round the big store became 
crowded with expectant coupon holders. 
The lucky customers were as follows : 
First prize, A. .Marriott, driving outfit ; 
econd, Miss F. Bulmer, malleable steel 
range ; third, VV. McNab, lady's cos- 
tume ; fourth, N. .1. Anderson, suit , 
lifth, T. Borgford, goods to the value of 
vjo , sixth, (i. McFarlane, dinner set ; 
seventh, J. W. Raynor, Stetson hat; 
eighth, Mason Bros., pair of shoes ; 
ninth, A. Randall, baseball outfit; 
tenth, T. Borgford, girl's suit. 



A very successful three day's fair was 
held this week. Amongst the goods ex- 
hibited were to be seen saddlery, har- 
ness and leather goods, binder twine, 
paints, plumbing goods, a furnace, elec- 
trical fixtures, etc. 



Contracts for the Flanagan Motel, 
now in course of erection, have been 
awarded as follows : general contract, 
Shannon Bros.; plumbing, G. (1. Taylor; 
heating, Splayfords' ; metallic roofing, 
cornices and galvanized iron work, M. 
[sbister & Son. 

42 



The Western Plumbing Company have 
secured the contract for plumbing and 

heating the Northern Hank building, 
also plumbing and healing of a double 
house being erected lor tin Hoeschen- 
Wentzler Brewing Company. 



VV. K Mosci, ol I he til in of .1. (i . 
tfosei A Son, formerly of Blylh, Out . 
is now manager of the hardware and 
plumbing department of the .1. F. 
('aims departmental stoic Mi Mose'r 
reports trade brisk and the firm has re- 
cently been awarded the following con- 
tracts : Plumbing and heating of the 
Bank of Commerce, Hanson block, 
Sutherland block, and Gordon & Spar 
ling block. Plumbing of the Alexander- 
residence, Bulmer residence, Howes 
residence and F. Cahill's residence. 



John Gunn & Sons, who are at 
present putting in the concrete work for 
the Grand Trunk Pacific bridge here, 
have been awarded another contract at 
Lethbridge, Alta. This for an immense 
steel bridge for the Canadian Pacific 
Railway. Gunn & Sons will build all 
Hie abutments and the concrete sub- 
structure, which will cost in the neigh- 
borhood of $300,000' 



NAIL-HOLDING HAMMER. 

A tool adapted to be used for driving 
nails in shingles and lathing, and espe- 
cially for overhead work, has been in- 
vented by H. C. Lyon, Howard Lake. 
Minn. This hammer is provided with 
means to contain a quantity of nails. 
and to deliver them singly at the ball ol' 
the, tool and hold them in such position 
in line with the hammer head that they 
may be partially driven into an object 
without being handled. 



CUTTING-TOOL HOLDER. 

F. A. Hummel, New York, N.Y.. has 
invented an improved cutting-tool hold- 
er. The instrument has been designed 
to operate upon a rod', shaft, tube, or the 
like, held by a chuck or a face-plate and 
dog, or in any desired manner, at the 
head centre of a lathe, so as to be rotat- 
ed. It is intended to be applied to I he 
work and held by hand or other means 
in a stationary position centered by the 
lathe and fed up to the work by the tail 
centre or other means, so that upon ro- 
tation of the work the operation will 
be performed upon it by the stationary ! 
cutting tool. 



FIREPROOF CHRISTMAS TREE. 

An ingenious Christmas tree has re- 
rently been invented by F. L. McGahan, 
Los Angeles, Cal. While the construc- 
tion may be employed as a Christmas 
tree, ii may be used as an advertising 
de\ ice or a display rack, and when 
made upon a small scale may be em- 
ployed as a toy. The tree may be mount- 
ed in various ways, and may be lighted 
bv 'j'.-. elect ricit v. or candles. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



GOOD PROMISE BETTER THAN 

BAD CHECK. 
The salesman is always ready to take 

your order, and it's easy to buy; but 

paying sometimes gets to be what Sher- 
man said war was. In paying your hills. 
if you do so by check, he sure there is 

enough money in the hank, and don't 
calculate thai Messrs. Jones & Brown 
will not put your check through for a 
day or so, and pay another hill witli 
what you have on deposit, hoping for 
good business or some fellow to pay a 
bill to tide you over, because it's a 
known fact thai some of these credit, 
men have wonderful intuitive powers, 
and just about that time the credit man 
with Jones & Brown is going to rush 
your check through. Ami then — well 
you figured wrong or the bank was 
wrong. Don't do it — if business is quiet, 
Collections poor, or unlooked-for ex- 
penses have depleted your cash balance, 
tell the truth, and say that in about ten 
days or two weeks you will remit. Al- 
ways remember that a good promies is 
better than a returned cheek marked 
' ' No Funds. ' ' 



POLISH FOR CLEANING FURNI- 
TURE. 

Splashes of dirt on polished furniture 
are removed witli soap and water, and 
the wood is well rubbed 1 with a mixture 
of equal parts of spirit and oil or spirit 
and turpentine, applied with a woolen 
rag. This mixture has both a cleansing 
and polishing action, the polish being re- 
tained for a long time if well rubbed in 
and the surplus wiped off. Another good 
preparation for t lie same purpose is a 
solution of stearine in oil of turpentine 
and a little spirit, care being taken not 
to use so much stearine that white 
streaks are produced in the mass. When 
the turpentine and spirit have evapor- 
ated, the wood is well rubbed with a 
woolen rag. This gives an excellent pol- 
ish that can he renewed by rubbing when 
dimmed. Furniture with a matt finish 
can be renovated with a thin solution 
of white wax in oil of turpentine, or by 
rubbing it over with linseed oil. 



CLEANING PORCELAIN BATH TUBS 

To clean a porcelain lined bath tub, 
use hot water and a rag saturated with 
gasoline. If the gasoline is objection- 
able, smear a little vaseline on the 
dirtiest parts and remove dirt and vas- 
eline at once with rag and hot water. 
Never scour porcelain tub, nor nick nor 
scratch its surface in any way. 



THIS POINT WAS WELL TAKEN. 

A story is told of a poor boy who, 
while walking along a busy thorough- 
fare, saw a pin on the pavement before 
him. Quickly he stayed his steps, and 
picking- up the pin. stuck it safely and 
securely in his coat. A wealthy man 
chancing to pass at that time, saw the 
action, and was much impressed by 't: 
so much so that he took the bov into 
his bank and finally adopted him. Thirtv 



years passed and the poor boj became 

a millionaire. Struck with an idea, he 
one day drew a cheque for 2,000 pounds 
and gave it to a former schoolmate, 
who had not prospered in the race of 
life. "All that I am now I owe to you 
.John," said the millionaire. " But I 
don't understand,' stammered the 
other. "Simple enough. If 1 hadn't 
hated you so at school I should never 
have picked up that pin to stick into 
you while we were in class." 



SIMPLE METAL POLISH. 

Metal polish is one of the easiest 
things in the world to manufacture, and, 
as the cost of materials is little or 
nothing, the profits are very large, ad- 
vises an exchange. Take any quantity of 
yellow or blue clay, perfectly free from 
sand, and allow it to dry. Pulverize by 
pounding it and run through a flour 
sieve, or a finer one, if one is obtain 
able. 

To five pounds of this sifted clay add 
one pound of sifted wood ashes and mix- 
to a very stiff paste with a solution of 
water and lye, in the proportion of one 
gallon of water to two heaping table- 
spoonfuls of lye. Spread this mixture on 
a flat, planed board and level off the top 
until it has a uniform thickness of about 
one inch. When it has become set, mark 
it off into squares about two inches on 
a side and cut apart. 

To use this polish, serape off a little 
on a moist cloth and rub the article to 
be polished, thereby giving it a glitter- 
ing, lustrous shine. It is said that one 
man has made a good living making and 
selling this polish. If the material is 
sifted carefully in the making the pre- 
paration will not scratch the finest pol- 
ished surface. 



ORIGINAL ADVERTISING. 

An original form of advertising comes 
from Russia where a shopkeeper posted 
up the following announcement : 

"The reason why I have hitherto been 
able to sell goods so much cheaper than 
anybody else is that I am a bachelor, 
and do not need to make a profit for 
the maintenance of a wife and children. 

"It is now my duty of informing the 
public that this advantage will shortly 
be withdrawn from them, as I am about 
to be married. They will, therefore, do 
well to make their purchases at once at 
the old rate." 

The result was that there was such a 
run on the shop that in the course of a 
few days this shopkeeper had made 
monev enough to pay the expense of his 
wedding on a very lavish scale. — Ex. 



ODD STREET PAVEMENT. 

The city of Monterey, California, has 
a street paved with the backbones of 
whales. The segments of the vetebrae 
were used as we use stone for street 
paving. The history connected with this 
pavement relates that about one hun- 
dred years ago a large school of whales 
was driven ashore and perished. After 
the flesh had decayed the backbones of 
these whales were used for paving the 
streets in place of large sea shells, 
which are frequently used for the same 
purpose. The streets in the old Spanish 
towns of California often served for man 
and beast, there being no sidewalks. 

43 



FOUR WAYS OF DOING BUSINESS. 

A i! i] m. i.oi urer" is quoted 

by an American exchange as instancing 
the four following was s of doing 

ncss : 

1. The Dishonest Way. — Sell so low 
you '-.nil rain a living, and the 
sheriff will anally wind up your afl 
and your creditors carrj your lo 

'J. The Misrepi < eni at W a Palm 

off upon sour customers unfair goods 
and persuade them that they are the 

'A. The Suicidal Way. — Employ work- 
men at less than living wages ; bus the 
cheapest materials; pare everything 
down to the lowest notch, and patch 

results. 

4. The Straight Was Buj the best; 
employ skilled labor; thoroughly know 
your own business and business values. 
Provide special facilities for the execu- 
tion of the greatest amount of high 
grade production at a minimum cost. 
A soid extravagant management, cx- 
pensive methods, and have your dealings 
with customers svho appreciate honest 
t rcat ment. 



JAPS FIND COPPER IN B. C. 

The discovery of copper ore in the 
northern inland of British Columbia by 
• laps reads like a romance. The Japs 
were there fishing and diving for aba- 
lona shells used in Japanese commerce. 
They found that the reefs sshere they 
were carrying on their operations on 
Queen Charlotte Sound, were not coun- 
try rock as supposed, but great reefs 
of mineral. One of their divers svhen at 
the bottom of the sound came across a 
chunk of pure yellow metal he thought 
was gold, but which was native copper. 
The Japs then quit their search for 
shells and became miners. Besides cop- 
per-, quantities of iron ore were found. 
The little brown men said nothing until 
i Ih\ secured ample capital to work their 
claims, which they are now doing. Sev- 
eral Americans, however, are located on 
properties beside them. 



FINE METAL POLISH. 

A good polish for fine metals is made 
by mixing a little vaseline with the 
ashes of burned out or broken gas 
mantles. Apply svith a rag or linger and 
polish svith a clean rag. The best finish 
can be obtained by using a soft rag. 



WATER CLOSET FLUSHER. 

An improved flushing device for water 
closets, bosvls and the like has been in- 
vented by L. W. Eggleston, Appleton, 
\\i- The usual tank and supply tank 
are employed bj the inventor. At the 
upper end of the pipe is a valve casing 
in which is a nozzle or injector dis- 
charging water into the tank. A plug 
valve having slidahle movement within 
the casing and movably connected ssith 
which is an actuating lever, through 
whose medium the valve is closed to 
open the nozzle outlet and again close 
it, A controlling member is employed 
for i he lever intermediate of which and 
a co-operating tloat are other members 
of special construction. The flushing de- 
rices are primarily actuated by the 
usual pull chain. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA HARDWARE AND METAL MARKETS 

r»ph ui' io 12 a. m Fiidtf Aug 16 Boon 511, Union Hunk BMg, Winnipeg, Man. 

An average business for the season of the year is reported by the whole- 
sale 1: flic trade are waiting i'<>r the crop and there will not be much ac- 
tivity until after when dealers will know what they have to expect. 
Values are steady. 



ROPE}— Sisal, lie. per lt>., and pure 
manila, lj^e. 
LANTERNS— Cold blast, per dozen, 

coppered, $9 ; dash, $9. 
WIRE— Barbed wire, 100 lbs., $3.22i ; 
plain galvanized, 6, 7 and 8, $3.70; No. 
. No. 10, $3.70; No. 11, $3.80; 
No. 12, $3.45; No. 13, $3.55; No. 14, 
$4; No. 15, $4.25; No. 16, $4.40; plain 
twist, $3.45; staples, $3.50; oiled an- 
nealed wire, 10, $2.90; 11, $2.96; 12, 
$3.04; 13, $3.14; 14, $3.24; 15, $3.39; 
annealed wires (unoiled), 10c. less; soft 
copper wire, base, 36c; brass spring 
wire, base, 30c. 

POULTRY NETTING— The discount is 
now 47£ per cent, from list price, in- 
stead of 50 and 5 as formerly. 

HORSESHOES— Iron, No. to No. 1, 
$4.65; No. 2 and larger, $4.40; snow- 
shoes, No. to No. 1, $4.90; No. 2 and 
laiger, $4.65; steel, No. to No. 1, $5; 
No. 2 and larger, $4.75. 

WORSEN AILS— No. 10 and larger, 22c, 
No. 9, 24c; No. 8, 24c; No. 7, 26c; 
No. 6, 28c; No. 5, 30c; No. 4, 36c 
per lb. Discounts: "C" brand, 40, 10,10 
and 7* p.c.; "M.R.M." cold forged pro- 
cess, 50 and 5 p.c. Add 15c per box. 
Capewell brand, quotations on applica- 
tion. 

WIRE NAILS.— $3 f.o.b. Winnipeg, 
and $2.55 f.o.b. Fort William. 

CUT NAILS— Now $3.20 per keg. 

PRESSED SPIKES — i x 5 and 6, 
$4.75; 5-6 x 5, 6 and 7, $4.40; I x 6, 7 
and 8, $4.25; 7-16 x 7 and 9, $4.15; \ x 
8, 9, 10 and 12, $4.05; % x 10 and 12, 
$3.90. All other lengths 25c extra net. 

SCREWS— Flat head, iron bright, 80, 
10, 10 and 10 ; round head, iron, 80 ; 
flat head, brass, 75 ; round head, brass, 
70 ; coach, 70. 

NUTS AND BOLTS — Bolts, car* 
riage, 1 or smaller, 60 p.c; bolts, car- 
riage, 7-16 and up, 50; bolts, machine, 
I and under, 50 and 5; bolts, machine, 
7-16 and over, 50; bolts, tire, 65; bolt 
ends, 55; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 and 10; 
machine screws, 70; plough bolts, 55; 
square nuts, cases, 3 ; square nuts, small 
lots, 2J; hex nuts, cases, 3; hex nuts, 
small lots, 2\ p.c Stove bolts, 70 and 
10 p.c. 

RIVETS — Iron, 60 and 10 p.c. ; cop- 
per, No. 7, 43c; No. 8, 42$c; No. 9, 
45£c ; copper, No. 10, 47c ; copper, No. 
12. 50Jc; assorted, No. 8, 44$c, and 
No. 10, 48c 

COIL CHAIN — \-m., $7.25; 5-16, 
$5.75; 2. $5.25; 7-16, $5; i, $4.75; 9-16, 
?4.70; I. $4.65: 3, $4.65. 

SHOVELS— List has advanced $1 per 
dozen on all spades, shovels and scoops. 

HARVEST TOOLS— 60 and 5 p.c 

AXE HANDLES— Turned, s.g. hick- 
rov. doz., $3.15; No. 1, $1.90; No. 2, 
$1.60; ortacron extra, $2.30; No. 1, $1.60. 



AXES — Bench axes, 40; broad axes, 
25 p.c discount off list; Royal Oak, per 
doz., $6.25; Maple Leaf, $8.25; Model, 
$8.50; Black Prince, $7.25; Black Dia- 
mond, $9.25; Standard flint edge, $8.75; 
Copper King, $8.25; Columbian, $9.50; 
handled axes, North Star, $7.75; Black 
Prince, $9.25; Standard flint edge, 
$10.75; Copper King, $11 per dozen. 

CHURNS— 45 and 5; list as follows: 
No. 0, $9; No. 1, $9; No. 2, $10; No. 
3, $11; No. 4, $13; No. 5, $16. 

AUGER BITS— "Irwin" bits, 47* 
per cent., and other lines 70 per cent. 

BLOCKS— Steel blocks, 35; wood, 55. 

FITTINGS — Wrought couplings, 60 ; 
nipples, 65 and 10; T. 's and elbows, 10; 
malleable bushings, 50; malleable un- 
ions, 55 p.c. 

HLNGES— Light "T" and strap, 65. 

HOOKS — Brush hooks, heavy, per 
doz., $8.75 ; grass hooks, $1.70. 

STOVE PIPES— 6-in., per 100 feet 
length, $9; 7-in., $9.75. 

TINWARE, ETC.— Pressed, retinned, 
70 and 10 ; pressed, plain, 75 and 2$ ; 
pieced, 30; japanned ware, 37£; enamel- 
led ware, Famous, 50; Imperial, 50 and 
10 ; Imperial, one coat, 60 ; Premier, 50 ; 
Colonial, 50 and 10; Royal, 60; Vic- 
toria, 45; White, 45; Diamond, 50; 
Granite, 60 p.c. 

GALVANIZED WARE — Pails, 37* 
per cent. ; other galvanized lines, 30 per 
cent. 

CORDAGE — Rope sisal, 7-16 and 
larger, basis, $11.25; Manilla, 7-16 and 
larger, basis, $16.25; Lathyarn, $11.25; 
cotton rope, per lb., 21c 

SOLDER— Quoted at 27c per pound. 
Block tin is quoted at 45c per pound. 

WRINGERS— Royal Canadian, $36 ; 
B.B., $40.75 per dozen. 

FILES — Arcade, 75; Black Diamond, 
60; Nicholson's, 62J p.c 

l.OCKS— Peterboro and Gurney, 40 
per cent. 

BUILDING PAPER— Anchor, plain, 
66c; tarred, 69c; Victoria, plain, 71c; 
tarred, 84c; No. 1 Cyclone, tarred. 84c; 
No. 1 Cyclone, plain, 66c; No. 2 Joli- 
ette, tarred, 69c; No. 2 Joliette plain, 
51c; No. 2 Sunrise, plain, 56c 

AMMUNITION, ETC. — Cartridges, 
rim fire, 50 and 5; central fire, 33£ p.c; 
military, 10 p.c. advance. Loaded shells: 
12 gauge, black, $16.50; chilled, 12 
gauge, $17.50; soft, 10 gauge, $19.50; 
chilled, 10 gauge, $20.50. Shot: ordin- 
ary, per 100 lbs., $7.75; chilled, $8.10. 
Powder: F.F., keg, Hamilton, $4.75; 
F.F.G.. Dupont's, $5. 

REVOLVERS — The Iver Johnson 
revolvers have been advanced in price 1 . 
the basis for revolver with hammer be- 
ing $5.30 and for the hammerless $5.95. 

44 




Wa^on 
Paints 



are just the thing for 
wagons, sleighs and 
all sorts of agricul- 
tural implements. 

First-class paints, 
but easy to handle. 

Cheapest paint in 
the long run, because 
it wears. 

You will never 
have dissatisfied cus- 
tomers if you stick 
to Stephens' Paints. 

We are ready to 
ship anything you 
order without delay. 

Get a few cans, 
and see how good 
they really are. 

G.F. Stephens & Co. 



Limited 



PAINT MAKERS 

WINNIPEG and CALGARY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANTELS 

GRATES, FIREPLACE TRIMMINGS, TILING, SHOW CASES, 
BANK, BAR AND INTERIOR STORE FITTINGS 

Winnipeg Paint - Glass CI 



CALGARY 



Limited 
IPEG 



IRON AND STEEL— Bar iron basis, 
$2.70. Swedish iron basis, $4.95; sleigh 
shoe steel, $2.75; spring steel, $3.25; 
machinery steel, $3.50; tool steel, Black 
Diamond, 100 lbs., $9.50; Jessop, $13. 

SHEET ZINC— $8.50 for cask lots, 
and $9 for broken lots. 

CORRUGATED IRON AND ROOF- 
ING, ETC.— Corrugate iron 28 gauge 
painted $3, galvanized $4.10; 26 gauge 
$3.35 and $4.35. Pressed standing 
seamed roofing 28 gauge painted $3.10, 
galvanized $4.20; 26 gauge $3.45 and 
$4.45. Crimped roofing 28 gauge paint- 
ed $3.20, galvanized, $4.30; 26 gauge 
$3.55 and $4.55. 

PIG LEAD— Average price is $6. 

COPPER— Planished copper, 44c. per 
lb. ; plain, 39c. 

IRON PIPE AND FITTINGS— Black 
pipe, i-in., $2.65; |, $2.80; i, $3.50; £, 
$4.40; 1, $6.35; 1L $8.65; 11, $10.40; 
2, $13.85; 2J, $19; 3, $25. Galvanized 
iron pipe, f-in., $3.75; i, $4.35; f, $5.65; 
1, $8.10; U, $11; li, $13.25; 2-inch, 
$17.65. Nipples, 70 and 10 per cent.; 
unions, couplings, bushings and plugs, 
60 per cent. 

GALVANIZED IRON — Apollo, 16- 
gauge, $4.15 ; 18 and 20, $4.40 ; 22 and 
24, $4.65 ; 26, $4.65; 28, $4.50; 30 gauge 
or lOJ-oz., $5.20 ; Queen's Head, 20 
$4.60,; 24 and 26, $4.90 ; 28, $5.15. 

LEAD PIPE— Market is firm at $7.80. 

TIN PLATES— IC charcoal, 20 x 28, 
box, $10; IX charcoal, 20 x 28, $12; 
XXI charcoal, 20 x 28, $14. 

TERNE PLATES— Quoted at $9.50. 

CANADA PLATES — 18 x 21, 18 x 
24, $3.50; 20 x 28, $3.80; full polished, 
$4.30. 

LUBRICATING OILS— 600W, cylin- 
ders, 80c; capital cylinders, 55c. and 
50c. ; solar red engine, 30c. ; Atlantic red 
engine, 29c. ; heavy castor, 28c. ; medium 
castor, 27c; ready harvester, 28c; stan- 
dard hand separator oil, 35c; standard 
gas engine oil, 35c per gallon. 

PETROLEUM AND GASOLENE — 
Silver Star, in bbls., per gal., 20c ; Sun- 
light, in bbls., per gal., 22c; per case, 
$2.35; Eocene, in bbls., per gal., 24c; 
per case, $2.50; Pennoline, in bbls., per 
gal., 24c; Crystal Spray, 23c; Silver 
Light, 21c; engine gasoline in barrels, 
gal., 27c; f.o.b. Winnipeg, in cases, $2.- 
75. 



PAINTS AND OILS — White lead, 
pure, $6.50 to $7.50, according to brand; 
bladder putty, in bbls., 2£c; in kegs, 
Sfc.; turpentine, barrel lots, Winnipeg, 
90c; Calgary, 97c; Lethbridge, 97c; 
Edmonton, 98c Less than barrel lots, 
5c. per gallon advance. Linseed oil, 
raw, Winnipeg, 72c; Calgary, 79c; 
Lethbridge, 79c; Edmonton, 80c; boiled 
oil, 3c. per gallon advance on these 
Drices. 

WINDOW GLASS — 16-oz. O. G., 
single, in 50-ft. boxes— 16 to 25 united 
inches, $2.25 ; 26 to 40, $2.40 ; 16-oz. 
O.G., single, in 100-ft. cases— 16 to 25 
united inches, $4 ; 26 to 40, $4.52 ; 41 
to 50, $4.75 ; 50 to 60, $5.25 ; 61 to 70, 
$5.75. 21-oz. C.S., double, in 100-ft. 
cases, 26 to 40 united inches, $7.35 ; 41 
to 50. $8.40; 51 to 60, $9.45 ; 61 to 70, 
$10.50; 71 to 80, $11.55 ; 81 to 90, $17.- 
30. 



SMOKE CONSUMER. 

An apparatus for consuming smoke in 
stoves and furnaces has been invented 
by C. J. Roux, 12 Rue Doudeauville, 
Paris, France. The invention is appli- 
cable to domestic and industrial heat- 
ing apparatus of all kinds. By its means 
complete combustion may be obtained 
and absolute consumption of smoke, 
whatever the nature of the fuel may be, 
as soon as normal conditions have been 
established, even with the softest coals. 



STOVE, FURNACE OR DRUM. 
J. H. Hanson, Aitkin, Minn., is the 
inventor of an important heating im- 
provement, by means of which hot gas- 
es are brought into close contact with 
the outer wall of the stove so as to 
give opportunity for the wall to absorb 
the heat from them. An arrangement 
of disks tends to choke the flow so as 
to give time for this heat absorption. 
There is no danger of an actual chok- 
ing of the draft, as the area of annular 
spaces surrounding the disks through 
which the gases pass, is always equal 
to or more than equal to the area of 
the stove pipe. 



VALUE OF FIELD STORE BUILDING 
A valuation of $4,083,400 has been 
placed on the Marshall Field & Co. 
retail store, Chicago, as the worth of 
the building alone, and does not include 
either the stock or the land. The great 

45 



structure, running from Randolph to 
Washington Street in State Street and 
from 73 to 92 Wabash Avenue, is there- 
fore considered the most valuable mer- 
cantile building in Chicago, if not in 
the world. The assessment valuation is 
put at a higher rate per foot because of 
the costly mahogany woodwork and 
o tlicr finishings. The valuation this year 
is the first that has been made since 
the entiie building has been completed. 



BATH CABINET. 

An invention referring to cabinets for 
steam or medicated vapor baths and 
especially useful as an attachment for 
anil in connection with bath tubs of the 
usual kind has been successfully worked 
out by C. W. Groover, Valdosta, Ga. 
The aim is to provide a cabinet or cover 
by means of which the ordinary bath 
tnli can be converted into a steam or 
vapor bath, which is capable of being 
removed and packed small when not in 
use, and which the bather can manipu- 
late without assistance. 



IMPROVED HASP. 

S. B. Phelps, Green Hill, Chester 
County, Pa., has invented a hasp which 
is simple in form and so constructed 
that it will lie upon the interior; the 
general purpose being to prevent its 
being tampered with by a dishonest 
person. It relates to hasps such as used 
on chest doors, boxes, or in similar 
constructions. The fact that the entire 
hasp is within the interior of the chest 
and not in position to be reached by an 
intruder, is not only an advantage from 
the point of utility, but tends to give 
the chest a neat appearance. 



THOUGHT IT A BARGAIN. 

A smartly dressed young man was 
chatting with a prominent financier of a 
most economical disposition, when the 
latter suddenly drew attention to the 
suit of clothes he was then wearing. 

"I never pay fancy prices for raade-to- 
ordrr garments," he said. "Now, here's 
a suit for which I paid $12. Appear- 
ances are very deceptive. If I told you 
I purchased it for $20 or $25 you'd 
probably believe that to be the truth. " 

"I would if you told me by tele- 
phone," replied the young man. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Heating and Housefurnishings 



INCREASING STOVE SALES. 

••\ special plan for increasing stove 
Bales came to my knowledge since your 
issue of July 13th, when this matter 
was presented by several persons," 
writes Charles 1>. Chown. "A few 
years ago an Ottawa linn, who handled 
bicycles, automobiles, etc, during the 
summer months, arranged to take up the 
sale of a first-class line of stoves and 
s, made in Hamilton. They had a 
large show room that permitted them to 
make a display of the full range of 
styles, so they could show a prospective 
customer a stove or range with the equip- 
ment he or she desired. 

"They engaged a canvasser, fortified 
him with circulars such as the manufac- 
turers provide their customers with for 
distribution at exhibitions and to pros- 
pective customers. These circulars bore 
the name and address of the selling con- 
cern. The canvasser did not endeaver 
to make sales, simply make enquiries as 
to whether the party called upon need- 
ed or would need or knew of any one 
thai would need a stove or range. Tf 
he found that they did or would he left 
circulars of the lines they were likely to 
be interested in and asked them to call 
and examine their display. 

"The results were such as to justify 
the expenses incurred, as they sold over 
400 stoves that season, which brought 
them further business the following sea- 
son. This line of work would be espe- 
cially desirable where gas. cither manu- 
factured or natural, is about to become 
available for cooking or heating, and 
would probably result in keeping the 
trade in pas stoves in the hands of the 
stove trade, rather than in the hands of 
the nas companies, which have in many 
places, in order to get persons to use 
sold stoves at a margin of profit 
that made it unprofitable for the regular 
stove trade to handle gas stoves," 



STRUCTURE OF METALS. 

Dr. J. A. Ewing, F.R.S., recently gave 
before a scientific society in England a 
lecture on the structure of metals. Un- 
der the microscope all metals show prac- 
tically the same structure. A piece of 
metal i- built up of innumerable par- 
ticles, similar to each other, as so many 
bricks, or perhaps stones, built into a 
wall. The separate -rains tire not quite 
so regular in Bhape and size as bricks. 
They .are laid in a perfectly regular for- 
mation. This i- revealed by the micro- 
scopic examination of highly-polished 
and etched surfaces of the metal. When 

a metal i- Btrained beyond the elastic 

limit, what takes place is that slips occur 
between the layers of brick-bats and the 

separate grains. Looked at from above 

these "slip lines* - seem like minute 

cracks, but they are really steps caused 
by the slipping of one layer on its 



neighbors, just as cards might --lip in a 
pack. Cards can be slipped only in two 
directions — sideways and lengthways. 
Bul the grains in metal can be slipped 
in a third direction- across the thick- 
ness of the card, owing to the fact that 
the metal is built up of such innumer- 
able small particles. When a piece of 
metal is bent backwards and forwards 

several times the "slip" is repeated, 
the cohesion of the particles to each 
other is broken and a crack results. 
When a piece of metal is strained be- 
yond the elastic point the slip has taken 
place, and it is obvious thai it will be a 
long time before the particles that have 
slipped away from each oilier will co- 
here as firmly to those that they have 
at last come next to. The technical name 
of this phenomenon is "fatigue." An- 
other thing that is constantly observed 
is also explained by this particular for- 
mation of metals, though not referred to 
by the lecturer. When a punching ma- 
chine comes down upon a three-six- 
teenths plate of iron the punch must 
move slowly. If it moves too rapidly 
the hole will not be punched, and the 
punch itself will be smashed. Tf the 
punch moves down slowly and deliber- 
ately the particles of metal have time 
to move out of the w T ay, and the hole is 
punched and no damage is done. Tn the 
same way if a cannon ball strikes a 
brick wall it will smash through the 
bricks, cutting some of them in half. If 
a lever is applied the wall breaks at the 
lines of mortar. 

MORE EARLY BUYING. 

The Gurney Foundry Company, To- 
ronto, has issued the following circular 
to the trade: 

During the fall months it is almost im- 
possible for us to promptly fill all or- 
ders for repair castings called for, and 
to assist the prompt shipment of such 
orders we urge that you place a stock 
order with us for a few standard sets of 
repairs for such stoves as yon have in 
your vicinity, of our make, that are like- 
ly to be called for. If such orders are 
placed at once, vexatious delays will be 
saved, and prompt service assured in the 
busier season. 

HOW THE LAMP CHIMNEY WAS 
DISCOVERED. 

The comfortable and convenient bun]) 
chimney of every-day use is to be attri- 
buted to a child's restlessness. Argand 
a native of Switzerland, a poor man, in- 
vented a lamp the wick of which was 
filler] into a hollow cyclinder, that al- 
lowed a current of air to supply oxygen 
to the interior as well as the exterior 
of the circular frame. The lamp was a 
success, but its inventor had never 
thought of adding a glass chimney, and 
probably never would have thought of 
it, had not his little brother been play- 

46 



tng in his workroom while Argand was 
engaged with the burning lamp. The 
hoy had gained possession of an old 
bottomless flask, and was amusing him- 
self by putting it over various small 
articles in the room. Suddenly he 
placed it over the top of the lamp, and 
the flame instantly responded by shoot- 
ing with increased brilliance up the nar- 
row neck of tine flask. Argand's ready 
brain at once caught the idea, and his 
lamp was perfected by the addition of 
a glass chimney. 

GASOLINE STOVES. 

This is the time when the gasoline 
stove season is on in full blast. 
Wholesalers report that dealers have 
been large buyers of high grade gaso- 
line stoves for this summer and re- 
tailers say that business up to date 
has been in many cases in excess of 
that of any previous year. 

The remarkably low prices at which 
these stoves are being placed in deal- 
ers' hands this year, notwithstanding 
the large advances which have taken 
place in nearly all the materials enter- 
ing into their construction, make them 
unusually profitable to handle. They arc 
easy to sell, for the reason that they 
are so much preferable to the larger 
coal or wood cook or range in warm 
weather and manufacturers have 
brought them to such a high state of 
perfection that they are very attract- 
ive. 

Old Timidity Overcome. 

The old timidity about gasoline stoves 
has pretty well disappeared. People 
have become educated to the fact that 
they are no more dangerous than any 
other kind of stoves, says Hardware 
Trade, and that only when the oper- 
ator is guilty of gross and inexcusable 
carelessness is there chance for an acci- 
dent. Fully ninety per cent, of the 
"gasoline stove explosions" we read 
about are not explosions at all, but 
simply cases in which the operator has 
been burned. Gasoline is allowed to 
drop down into the bottom tray and 
when a good deal of it has collected 
there a lighted match gets into it, there 
is a quick flaming- up and a loose, flow- 
ing sleeve catches fire. Then people say 
"gasoline stove explosion." 

The vapor gasoline stoves are wonder- 
fully clean, neat and convenient. Thev 
are about as near a gas stove as any- 
one could wish for and they have so' 
many strong points that the dealer 
should have no trouble in making the 
customer see their advantages. 

There is always a chance for a good 
business on small one and two-burner 
gasoline stoves for camping outfits, 
as they are much more convenient for 
camp cooking that the more romanth 
camp fire. 

Kerosene Stoves Popular. 

There are lots of kerosene stoves being 
sold all the time and they are often pre- 
ferred h\ people who cannot overcome 
their timidity about gasoline. There is 
a blue flame kerosene stove with a wick 
that is an enormous seller and that is 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



pronounced by drains to be the best 
thing thej have over seen. 

( )i oourse, tor towns where there is 
gas, gas ranges arc the, best thing to 
buy and to sell. There has been a 
wonderful increase in the use of these 
ranges within the last tew scars and 
they are becoming more popular every 
day. (las water heaters are a very pro- 
fitable line for deal ers, to handle in 
towns where there is gas. 



COPPER ALLOYS. 

In a recent issue of Metallurgies an 
investigation of the alloys of copper 
and phosphorus by Messrs. Heyn and 
Bauer is published, with numerous 
micro-photographs of the various re- 
sults obtained by them. The method of 
producing the alloys is described, and 
tables and graphic diagrams to indicate 
the general outcome of the experi- 
ments. The alloys were partly fused in 
the electro furnace and partly in a Roes- 
ter gas blast furnace. There is a mark- 
ed entetic line at a temperature of 707 
degrees C, and a distinct* entetic point 
with about 8.25 per cent, of phosphorus. 



INDUSTRIAL VENTILATION. 

In a recent article by Miss Gertrude 
Beeks, welfare secretary of the National 
Civic Federation, the subject of indus- 
trial ventilation is thus presented : 

Systems of ventilation which permit 
a complete change of air in the work- 
rooms at least every fifteen minutes are 
already becoming installed in many mod- 
ern structures. Emplayers are begin- 
ning to realize the desirability of going 
to the expense of installing such sys- 
tems in old buildings. In one notable 
case the cost of installation was six 
thousand dollars, but the reduction there- 
after of the percentage of absences be- 
cause of illness was so great that the 
employer was compensated for the out- 
lay. He also found that while previ- 
ously the employes were likely to be- 
come stupid the latter part of the after- 
noon, the new system maintained alert- 
ness diiring the entire day. 

It has been found advantageous to in- 
stall, even in the old cotton mills, ex- 
haust systems for the removel of the 
lint resultant from the first processes of 
manufacture. Where it is necessary to 
humidify the air in the textile industry, 
employers have found that the cold wa- 
ter spray provides an atmospheric con- 
dition much more comfortable for the 
operatives than the steam spray during 
the summer season, and that heat is not 
essential to the successful manufacture 
of cotton goods. In the foundry, where 
the pipes which are used in the 
winter for heating serve to bring in the 
cool air in the summer, great comfort is 
afforded the molders. 

Galvanized iron pipes carry fresh air 
to the faces of the men employed in roll- 
ing mills. Previously, in very hot wea- 
ther, the men were frequently overcome, 
and sometimes it was necessary to shut 
down the entire mill, the workmen there- 
by losing their wages and the company 
the output. Where these ventilating 



QUALITY HIGH 
PRICE RIGHT - 



ON ALL OUR 



M 



" Metallic 

Goods 

" EASTLAKE " SHINGLES 
MANITOBA SIDING 
ROCK-FACED SIDING (4 in 1) 
SKYLIGHTS 

" HALITUS " VENTILATORS 
FIREPROOF DOORS and WINDOWS 
GALVANIZED CORNICES 
SHEET METAL FRONTS 
CORRUGATED IRON 



It is a pleasure to give information and prices on any of these goods 
"OUR DEALERS ALWAY8 PROTECTED" 



THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

Manufacturers Established 22 Years 

TORONTO AND WINNIPEG 



systems have been installed, not a single 
hour's time has been lost because of the 
excessive heat. In a watch factory fresh 
air, which has been forced through sheets 
of water, is conducted through pipes to 
the faces of the young women who sit 
in front of the ovens baking the faces 
of the watches. 

In the case of stationary engineers and 
firemen, some thoughtful employers have 
(•allied the pipes for forced ventilation 
above the furnace doors to prevent the 
firemen from baking their faces when 
''hauling the fires." Others have con- 
tributed greatly to their comfort by ex- 
hausting the foul_, hot air and throwing 
fresh air into the furnace and boiler 
rooms. In many places this is seriously 
needed, because the rooms are located in 
the sab-cellar or interiors of structures. 



LETTER BOX. 

Correspondence on matters of interest 
to the hardware trado is solicited. 
Manufacturers, jobbers. retailers and 
clerks are urged to express their opin- 
ions on matters under discussion. 

Any questions asked will be promptly 
answered. Do you want to buy anything, 
want some shelving, a silent salesman, 
any special line of goods, anything in 
connection with the hardware trade ? 
Ask us. We'll supply the necessary In- 
formation. 

Chas. Worrod, hardware merchant, 
Tottenham, Ont., writes : "Kindly give 
me the address of the Standard Sewing 
Machine Co. I want to get the agency." 

Ans. — "Write Standard Sewing Ma- 
chine Co., Hamilton, Ontario." — Editor. 



Energy in selling goods is right, but 
is should be backed up by determination 
to collect the cash as soon as due. 

47 



An increasing demand for small, 
portable oil heaters is noted by whole- 
salers. These are mighty handy 
things on cool evenings and mornings 
and they have many strong points 
which make them big sellers. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



QUEBEC STOVE TRADE. 

Daring the past year the demand for 
Btoves and ranges throughout the pro- 
vinee, and eastwards, has steadily in- 
creased. Not only has the number of 
orders increased, but a higher order of 
stoves is being demanded. This has na- 
turally affected prices. The higher the 
production, the greater will be 
the cost of manufacture. 

rally speaking, there has been an 
advance of S per cent, over last year's 
sost. The difficulty in procuring efficient 
workmen and raw material has been the 
cause of this advance. It is expected 
thai even a greater demand will prevail 
during the coining year as new fields 
have been opened, especially in northern 
Quebec, in the districts immediately 
north of Three Rivers and Quebec city. 
If the Grand Trunk Pacific project is 
completed, thereby opening up northern 
Quebec, the new field should prove a 
fruit tul one to stove dealers. 

One new manufactory has come into 
the tield this summer, namely, the Thos. 
Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal, famous 
throughout the Dominion for their vari- 
ous lines of hardware manufactures. 
Everything now from the highest class 
of range to the smallest teaspoon are 
manufactured in their extensive fac- 
tories. The excellence of their lines is 
not less than the variety. Their works 
cover a large area, and their advent in 
the stove field is but a natural outcome 
of their progress and success in other 
fields. 

Now that the range has become uni- 
versally popular and is going into the 
homes of the poor as well as the rich, it 
was considered advisable by the Thos. 
Davidson Co., in putting a new line of 
sto\es on the market, to do away with 
all such needless things as ornaments in 
order to lessen the cost of manufacture 
and, therefore, the cost to the user. The 
most noticeable feature in the "leader" 
line of ranges and stoves is the absence 
of ornaments. Plainness is what is aim- 
ed at. This permits of putting a better 
quality of material in necessary parts of 
the stove. 

The Record Foundry Co., of Mon- 
treal, a pioneer stove company, has done 
a record-breaking volume of business 
during the past year. Their business is 
steadily expanding and all prospects 
point to an even greater volume being 
transacted during the coming year. 

FURNACE IMPROVEMENT. 
An improvement in furnaces has re- 
cently been invented by W. J. Hatcher 
and J. W. Crim, Johnston, South Qaro- 
Una. By this const ruction of furnace, 
the inventors provide an efficient heat- 
ing means, requiring but a small amount 
of fuel and adapted tot use in or out of 
doors For out of door use a bottom 
01 casing in the furnace is not needed. 

DAMPER REGULATOR. 

A regulator stub as is used in connec- 
tion with boilers and furnaces has re- 
cently been invented by .J. Scales, New 
York. NY. The object of the invention 



is to produce a mechanism for automa- 
tically controlling the position of the 
damper in the Hue leading from the lire 
box; in order to reduce the amount of 
draft when the boiler 01 furnace becomes 
too hot or is supplying too great a 
quantity of steam. 

GAS REGULATORS FOR BURNERS. 

In a recent invention C. F. (Jaffney, 
New York, N.Y., aims to provide an .it 
tachuient to a burner, whereby when a 
vessel or object to be heated is placed 
over an opening in the stove above the 
burner, a full head of gas will be auto- 
matically supplied to the burner. Upon 
removal of such vessel or object from 
over the opening the supply to the bur- 
ner will be automatically reduced to a 
greater or lesser extent according to the 
set adjustment of the device, the supply 
cock being meanwhile open. 

WATER-BACK SHIELD. 

Heat radiated by a hot water boiler 
connected with a water back attached 
to a range frequently renders a kitchen 
uncomfortable, especially in summer, 
and in many cases the backs are re- 
moved at such time, and it is often 
necessary to open the hot water faucet 
so as to cool the boiler. 

A device recently invented by S. M. 
Stevens, Asheville, N.C., dispenses with 
such inconvenience and also avoids heat- 
ing water when not wanted, thereby 
economizing in fuel. 



COOKING STOVE. 

In an improvement to a cooking -tove 
jointly worked out by F. Oberheqk, 
New Athens, and C. T. Taylor, Mount 
Sterling, 111., fresh heated ajr is ad- 
mitted to the oven, causing the evapor- 
ation to take place faster and thereby 
removing the moisture from the mater- 
ial being cooked and causing such ma- 
terial, particularly bread, to bake much 
quicker. The number of flues and damp- 
ers existing in the common form of cook- 
'ing stoves is reduced, and the means for 
providing air circulation through the 
oven results in thorough, even and 
healthful cooking of food. 



A BIG DITCH THIS. 

The present digging equipment on the 
Panama canal consists of 63 steam 
shovels, 32 of 95 tons, 28 of 70 tons, and 
3 of 45 tons each, while 15 further 95- 
ton and 7 45-ton steam shovels are to 
he delivered this year. There are also 
184 locomotives in service, 228 steam or 
pneumatic drills and 73 machine or well 
drills. While there was a falling off in 
the rate of digging in Maj and June, 
due to the rain season, it is expected 
that 1,000,000 cubic yards a month will 
l>e reached later in the year. The total 
excavation necessary to dig the canal 
was figured at 111,280,000 cubic yards. 
To July the amount taken out was 8,- 
(i.Yl ,802 cubic yards. At 1,000,000 cubic 
yards a month the channeling would 1 be 
completed in 1915. 



CATALOGUES AND BOOKLETS. 

When sending catalogues for review, 
manufacturers would confer a favor by 
pointing out the new articles that they 
oontain. It would ' assist the editor in 
writing the review. 

By mentioning HARDWARE AND 
METAL to show that the writer is in 
the trade, a copy of these catalogues or 
other printed matter will be sent by the 
firms whose addresses are given. 



Handsome Export Catalogue. 

Hardware and Metal is in receipt this 
week of a handsome export catalogue 
issued by A. Willander, Stockholm, 
Sweden. This catalogue is printed in 
English, German, French and Spanish, 
mil uating that export business is be- 
ing aggressively sought after. The prin- 
cipal line illustrated consists of a varie- 
ty of "Kvea" cooking stoves burning pe- 
troleum. No wick is used in these stoves 
and the flame is free from smoke, smell 
or soot. The '.Svea" stoves burn or- 
dinary petroleum, which during the cir- 
culation through the heated burner is 
transformed into petroleum gas. This 
gas escapes through a fine opening call- 
ed the nipple, and burns with a blue 
atmospheric flame. 

The catalogue may be secured by 
writing A. Willander, Stockholm, Swe- 
den, mentioning this paper. 



Welsh Tin-Plate. 

The Welsh Tinplate & Metal Stamp- 
ing Co., of Llanelly, S. Wales, have re- 
cently issued their 1907 catalogue of 
enamelled, tinned, etc. hollowware, a 
copy of which has been received. This 
catalogue conforms to the requirements 
of the trade in regard to size, and all 
its illustrations are made direct from 
photographs. Every article shown in 
the catalogue is made in the company's 
works at Llanelly, and it is the opinion 
of these manufacturers that they make 
a larger variety of enamelled and tinned 
hollowware, than any other individual 
makers, either British or continental. 
The present issue of their catalogue 
certainly conveys the impression that 
there is a very large organization at the 
back of it. The list is copiously index- 
ed and is printed in English, French, 
German and Spanish. The catalogue is 
for distribution amongst wholesale 
houses. 



Invite the hot-air spouter to 
again in December. 

48 



call 



PERMANANT ROAD MAKING. 

Many experiments are being made in 
various parts of Great Britain in per- 
manent road making. In Wolverhamp- 
ton (twelve miles from Birmingham) 
the borough engineer has been testing 
tour different kinds of materials in con- 
trast with the old-fashioned ordinary 
macadam, in order to see which system 
was the best qualified for the making of 
a substantial road surface in its resist- 
ance to heavy traffic, its imperviousness 
to wet, and a consequent accumulation 
of mud and dust. The materials used 
were what is known as tarmac — two dif- 
ferent kinds — and two other processes 
alike embodying the use of broken gran- 
ite and broken furnace slag, also soaked 
in tar. As a binding ingredient, tarmac 
seems to be gaining great favor. 



HARDWARE AND MRTAI. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

United 

HAMILTON ONT. 



CANADA PLATES 

Galvanized 

Polished 

Half Bright 

Stock and Import. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., Limited 



MONTREAL 



a 



MIDLAND 



9} 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land ' ' will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Prloe to Sales Agent* 

Drummond, MoCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 
•r t* 

Canada Iron Furnaoo Co. 



MIDLAND. ONT. 



Limited 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u .k.< 

NEW GLASGOW, M.S. 

Manufacturers of — ■ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 




•HAMMER THE HAMMER' 

That [ hrase has lummfied into universal popularity the 

IVER JOHNSON ££* Revolver 

which is a Dealer's Proposition, straight and 
simple. 

Never permitted as a premium. Never sold 
by mail where dealers can supply. One the 
dealer can safely recommend, and we will stand 
behind him. 

IVER JOHNSONS ARMS AND CYCLE WORKS, 

330 River St., Fitchburg. Mass. 

Makers of Iver Johnson Truss Bridge Bicycles and Single Barrel Shotguns 



Serd 
for 
Iver 

Johnson 
Catalogues 
tor 
| Dealers, 
ir ask 
our jobber 
he knows 



TINPLATES 

All made out ot the 

BEST SIEMEN'S MARTIN STEEL 



Brand 



Best Coke or Charcoal "Rhyd" 

Good Charcoal "Edith" 

Second Charcoal "Sawel" 

Best Charcoal "Dryw" 

Wr are ready to offer the Canadian Trade 
very best value and finest quality in Tinplates. 

Baglan Bay Tinplate Co., Limited 

Briton Ferry, South Wales 

Please mention above brands in your indents 
and inquiries. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery, 6d. and Is. Canisters 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY& SONS, Limited 

Manufact avert of 

Emery, Blaok Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Winston Mills, London, Esilanil 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, • 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 

49 



NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Go. 

NICKEL FOR 

NICKEL STEEL 

The Orforrj Copper Go, 



WRITE US FOR 

PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLAGE 

NEW YORK CITY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 

For additional items see the correspondence pages. The Editor 
solicits information from any authoritative source regarding build- 
ing and industrial news of an'- sort, the formation or incorporation 
of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories or 
foundries, railway or mining news. 



Industrial Development. 

The Hawes-YongoJ Mfg \ew 

York, are looking for a Bite in Brant' 

■ I. Out. 
K. T. Godman, Vancouver, B.C., will 

erect a mill between Point Atkinson 
and the Narrows. 

The Superior Oil Co., Sault Ste. 
.Mam-, (int.. suffered damage by fire to 
the extent of $1,200. 

Work has commenced on the tunnel 
for the Calgary Tower and Transmission 
Co.. Calgary, Alta. 

Fire did damage to the building oc- 
cupied bv the Waters Printing Co., W.u 
treal, to the extent of $15,000. 

The Adams Kiver Lumber Co., Shu- 
swap. B.C., will erect a large sawmill 
on Little Shuswap Lake. 

The North American Timber Co., St. 
Paul, Mum., will erect six large saw- 
mills in British Columbia. 

The shingle mill of the Valley Shingle 
Co., at Padden, B.C., was destroyed by 
tire, entailing a loss of $7,000. 

A local firm are contemplating the 
erection of a plant for the manufacture 
of wooden pipe at Penticton, B.C. 

Pressed Bricks, Limited, are anxious 
to obtain a site in Strathcona, Alta. 
They want an exemption from taxes. 

The Victor Wood Works Co., Amherst, 
X.S., have gone into liquidation. The 
-Maritime Heating Co. have also failed. 

The saw and shingle mills of the 
Miller & Seim firm at Hampden, Ont., 
were destroyed by fire recently; loss, 
000. 

The Jackson Wagon W 7 orks, Gait, 
have been purchased by D. Clement, 
Ayton, Ont., who will erect a sa"wmill 
there. 

The Prescott Marble & Granite Works 
have been purchased by Bowers Bros., 
marble dealers, of Ogdensburg and 
Prescott. 

The W. P. Demond Upholstering Co. 
wants to secure a loan of $12,000 and 
free water, before erecting a plant in 
Strathroy, Ont. 

The Rogers Mfg. Co., Kansas City, 
will erect a large plant at Strathroy, 
Ont., and manufacture malleable iron 
and journal boxes. 

The Ryan Storm Canopy Co., Sault 
Marie, want to locate in Western 
Ontario and ask a free site and a loan 
3,000 tor two years. 

The Cavendish Lumber Co., Lakefield, 
Ont., suffered loss by fire recently to 
the extent of $38,000. Nearly 1,500,000 
feet of lumber were destroyed. 

The barns of tin Southwestern Trac- 
tion (Jo., Lonaou, (Int., were destroyed 
by fire, with twenty valuable motors. 
The total loss was about $150,000. 

The work of building the plant of the 
cement works in Well and, Ont., is pro- 
Lng rapidly. The buildings will be 
completed by the end of the year. 

The Pocky Mountain Cement Co., To- 
ronto, will receive tenders for engines, 
boilers, mills, etc., to cost $00,300. E. 
H. Keating is the managing director. 



H. New, Hamilton, will form a com 
pan] and manufacture vitrified brick and 

othei materials. A modern plant will 
lie erected and a high grade product will 

b( turned out. 

The Pintsch Gas Co. have secured the 
contract for lighting the C.P.R. and 
C.N.R. trains on the Edmonton 
branches and will erect a large gas 
plant at Edmonton. 

An experiment is goim? on in Medicine 
llal with natural gas. It is proposed to 
compress it in tanks and sell it for use 
in place of gasoline. It is claimed to be 
\ei\ much cheaper and easier to handle. 

The Kadie-Douglas Co., Montreal, 
have been appointed Canadian agents 
for the waterproofing for concrete, 
plaster, wood, steel and iron manufac- 
tured by the Prescrvating Products Co., 
New York. 

The Oxbridge Organ and Piano Co., 
Uxbridge, Ont., suffered severely by fire 
recently. The building in which the 
greater part of their machinery was 
kept was destroyed by fire, entailing a 
loss of $25,000. 

An electric power plant may be estab- 
lished at Medicine Hat to operate the 
C.P.R. works and the pusher engines. 

The Canadian Machine Telephone Co. 
will erect a building in Brantford for 
their automatic exchange. 

The Schaake Machine Co., New West- 
minster, B.C., have secured the right 
to manufacture and sell a line of lath 
machines manufactured on a large 
scale by the Bolton Lath & Shingle 
Machinery Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

The electrical exhibition held by the 
Canadian Electrical Exhibition Co. 
will take place in Montreal for two 
weeks commencing Sept. 2. The annual 
convention of the Canadian Electrical 
Association will be held on Sept. 11, 
12 and 13. 

The Beach Mfg. Co., manufacturing 
the Beach Triple Expansion Engine and 
Cast Iron Culverts, are anxious to lo- 
cate in Port Arthur, Ont., and want a 
free site and twenty-five per cent, of 
capital subscribed. The. proposed cap- 
ital is $100,000. 

The Canadian Association of Sation- 
ary Engineers held its annual conven- 
tion in Guelph on Aug. 13, 14 and 15, 
when the following officers were elected: 
President, F. R. Chowen; vice-president, 
W. G. Waters; treasurer, Geo. Hird; 
secretary, Geo. Grievson. 

A company to be known as the Mon- 
itor Manufacturing Co., has been form- 
ed in Fredericton, N.B. The company 
will manufacture the Monitor Acetylene 
Generator. The capital of the company 
Is $25-000. They have secured a site and 
will begin operations immediately. 
Lighting plants of all sizes will be 
manufactured. 

Building Notes. 

A sanitarium may be erected at 
Ninette, Man. 

The contract for Hie building of the 
new court house at Victoria, B.C., has 
been awarded to McDonald, Wilson &) 

50 



Snyder of lh.it city, It will cost about 
(400,000. 

\ Presbyterian church will be elected 
at Finch, Out. 

A large school will be erected at 
I laileybury, Ont. 

The new C.P.R. sample room at Van- 
couver will cost $L>X, (Kill. 

II. Kohh, Winnipeg, will erect an 
apartment block to cost $58,000. 

I). Gibb & Son, Vancouver, will ereel 
<ui apartment house to cost $115,000. 

The new Seamen's Institute Building, 
at St. John, N.B. will cost $15,000. 

The new medical building at Med ill 
I Qiversity, .Montreal, will cost $511(1,11011. 

The Robert Clean Co., Toronto, will 
erect a warehouse in thai city to cost 
$10,500. 

A ]•:. Carter, Vancouver, will erect 
an apartment block in that city to cost 
$10,000. 

The trustees of the University of To- 
ronto will erect a residence in that 
c.ity at a cost of $150,000. 

The cornei' stone of the new high 
school at Picton, Ont. was laid recent 
ly. The building will cost $50,000. . 

The congregation of St. Alban's 
Church, New Westminster, B.C., will 
shortly erect a large church, the plans 
having been accepted. 

Companies Incorporated. 

Imperial Rubber Co., Montreal; capi- 
tal. $20,000; to make and deal in rubber 
and rubber goods. Incorporators: R. 
C. McMichael, D. J. Angus, R. 0. Mc- 
Murty, F. G. Bush, all of Montreal. 

The Canadian Jack Co., Windsor, 
Ont.; capital, $25,000; to manufacture 
and sell a combination lifting jack and 
farmers' tool. Provisional directors: J. 
W. Yakey, M. Riddle, H. H. Calkins, all 
of Windsor. 

James L. Burton & Son Lumber Co., 
Baiiie, Out.; capital, $250,000; to cut 
and deal in lumber. Provisional direc- 
tors: J. L. Burton, F. L. Burton, F. C. 
Lett, A. Alexander, W. H. Walter, all 
of Barrie. 

Mackie Bros., Ltd., North Bay, Ont.; 
capital, $100,000; to take over and con- 
duct the hardware business of 1). Purvis, 
North Bay. Provisional directors: A. 
T. Mackie. W. L. Mackie, B. S. Leeak. 
all of Pembroke, ( >nt. 

Victor Automatic Carriers. Montreal; 
capital, $20,000; to manufacture and 
deal in electric motors and dynamos and 
other power machinery. Incorporators: 
P. Filteau. F. H. Markev, R, C. Grant, 
(I. 0. U.vdc, all of Montreal. 

The (Ireat Northern Petroleum & As- 

phaltum Co., Ottawa; capital, $100,000; 
to prospect for and deal in oil and as- 
phaltimi. Incorporators: J. G. Gibson, 
II. II. Williams. M. C. Edey, W. C. Per 
kins, R. M. Perkins, all of Ottawa. 

The Lachute Graphite Mining Co., 
Township of Went worth, Que.; capital, 
$20,000; to mine, prepare and deal in 
graphite, plumbago and silver, clay 
bricks, marbles, and all kinds of arti- 
ficial stone. Incorporators: A. Gcdlbault, 
I. aclinic; Z. A. Fournier, St. Andrews. 



II \ R DW A R E AND M ETA \. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEnENTS. 

Advertiaements under this heading 2c. a word first 
naertion ; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, hut five figures (as 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittances to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no oase can this rule be overlooked . 
Advertisements received without remittance cannot be 
acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



AGENT WANTED. 



AGENT wanted to push an advertised line of Welsh 
tlnplaies; write at first to " B.B.," care HARD- 
WARE AND METAL, 88 Fleet St., E.G., 
London, Eng. [t(] 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

MINING hardware, stoves and tinware business for 
sale; sales $4,000 monthly; buildings and lot, 
$3,500; present stock, $8,000; proprietor's 
health failing; a bonanza. Box 643, HARDWARE 
AND METAL, Toronto. [32] 

FOR SALE — Well established hardware, tinshop. 
Implement and undertaking business, also good 
lumberyard, well fenced, with lumber and lime 
sheds in good condition ; we will sell above altogether, 
or divide same to suit purchaser; proprietors are 
retiring from business in Manitoba, and therefore wish 
for immediate sale. Apply to Eakins & Griffin, Shoal 
Lak:, Man. [33] 



WANTED— Partner to take half interest in one of 
the best hardware propositions in Algoma ; 
plumber preferred. Box 636, HARDWARE 
AND METAL, Toronto. [32] 

HARDWARE, tinware, stove and plumbing business 
in manufacturing town in the Niagara Peninsnla ; 
no competition ; $250,000 factory and water- 
marks will be completed this summer; stock about 
$3,000; death of owner reason for selling. Box 85, 
Thorold, Ont. [tf] 

I^OR SALE — A good hardware business in Western 
Ontario; stock about $6,000. For further refer- 
ence apply The Hobbs Hardware Co., Limited, 
London, Ont. [32] 

HARDWARE and Tin Business for Sale in good 
Western Ontario town of 3,000; stack about 
$3,500; good reasons for selling. Address, Box 647 
HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. (34) 

HARDWARE, Tinware, Stove and Furnace Business 
for sale, in live Eastern Ontario Village; first 
class chance for a practical man; English speaking 
community; stock can be reduced to suit purchaser; 
can give possession September 15th. 1907; premises 
for Sale or Rent, Apply to D. Courville, Maxville, 
Ont. (35) 

HARDWARE Business and Tinshop for sale in 
Saskatchewan; population 1500; stock carried 
about $14,000 turnover, $45,000 practically all cash 
business; cash required, $8,000 would rent building; 
Do not answer without you have the money and mean 
business; it will pay to investigate this. Box 648 
Hardware & Metal, Toronto. (41) 



WELL established tinsmith business in thriving 
Ontario village, including Eavetroughing, metal 
roofing, furnaces, pumps, pipefitting, hardware, 
paints, glass and stoves. Present stock about $1500; 
could be reduced. Shop and house combined, can be 
rented, including tools, horse and wagon, for $14.00 
per month; possession given at once. Box 682, 
HARDWARE AND METAL. (33) 



FOR SALE. 



FOR SALE — First-class set of tinsmith's tools 
second-hand but almost as good as new ; includes 
an 8 foot iron brick almost new. Apply Pease 
Waldon Co., Winnipeg. [tf[ 

FOR SALE— A quantity of galvanized plain twist wire. 
Apply to C. B. Miner, Cobden, Ont. (34) 



TEN gross of "Antisplash " Tap Filters. Made to 
fit on all ordinary kitchen taps, acts as a filter and 
prevents water splashing. Supplied with showcards to 
hold 1 dozen. Price per dozen $ 1 .00 ; price per gross 
$11.00. Sample on request. G. T. Cole, Box 460, 
Owen Sound, Ont. [36] 




Brighten Up 

It Pays to Advertise 

Advertising will help any business. Our fall "Brighten 
Up" Campaign is especially designed to help you in secur- 
ing new paint and hardware trade. Systematic advertis- 
ing has been an important factor in building up our ex- 
tensive business ; it will do the same for yours. Our 
advertising campaigns sell Sherwin-Williams Paints and 
Varnishes, and at the same time increase your trade in 
other lines. 

If you are not one of our agents at present, write to- 
day and get the benefit of the "Brighten Up" Campaign. 
The high quality of S-W. Products will sell other goods 
for you. Get the "Brighten Up" advertising now. 

The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

LARGEST PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS IN THE WORLD 

Canadian Headquarters and Plant : 639 Centre Street, Montreal, Que. 
Warehouses : 86 York Street, Toronto, and Winnipeg, Mao. 




SITUATIONS VACANT. 

TINSMITHS WANTED — First-class tinsmiths 
wanted for points west of Winnipeg; must be 
good mechanics capable of taking charge of a 
metal department; thorough knowledge of furnace 
work necessary. Pease Waldon C°., Winnipeg, Man. 
[If] 

WANTED-Hardware clerk, experienced, who can 
keep stock, and is willing to do so; sober and 
active ; state age, experience and salary expected 
at start. Hose & Canniff, Kenora, Ont. [32] 

WANTED-Hardware clerk, experienced and sober; 
state age and salary expected at start. Thomas 
Oliver, Copper Cliff, Ont. [33] 

SITUATIONS WANTED. 



SITUATION wanted as master mechanic or chief 
engineer by man of 22 years' experience as a 
mechanic; can give Al reference as to ability; 
strictly temperate. Box A, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto. [32] 

COMMERCIAL gentleman with nine years' trade 
connection with ironmongers, architects and pub- 
lic institutions in Great Britain desires position as 
representative of a Canadian manufacturing firm. 
Box X, HARDWARE AND METAL, Montreal. 



WANTED. 







FFICE space wanted by manufacturer In Toronto; 
state location and terms. Box 645, HARDWARE 
AND METAL, Toronto. [32] 

51 



THE WANT AD 



The want ad. has grown from a 
little used force in business life, 
into one of the great necessities 
of the present day. 

Business men nowadays turn to 
the " want ad " as a matter of 
course for a hundred small ter- 
vices. 

The want ad. gets work foi 
workers antl workers for work. 

It gets clerks for employers and 
finds employers for clerks. It 
brings together buyer and seller, 
and enables them to do business, 
though they may be thousands of 
miles apart. 

The " want ad." is the great 
force in the small affairs and inci- 
dents of daily life. 



HARD W ARE AND MET A L 



Quo.: .1. R. II vol A. T Woeltje, K. B. 
Kelly, all three «>i Watertown, N.Y. 

Tlif Natural Gas Supplies I ifon- 
Ireal: eapital. $18,000. t<> earrj on a 
plumbing and gas fitting business and 
deal in oil and gas wells, [incorporators: 
II. G. Eadie. II. 1'. Douglas. W. I.. Bond, 
E. Chamberland, M. I». Barclay, all of 
Montreal. 

Municipal Undertakings. 

\ watci svstrm is being installed in 
i he Snow shoe Wine, B.C. 

The ratepayers of flap id Citj voted 
on ,i by-law for municipal phones. 

New municipal buiklings will be ered 
cd ai Stirling, Alta.. to cost $12,000 

\ town ball ami public library will be 
erected a' Hanover, Out. ai .» cos4 ol 


A by-law lias been passed a1 Well, mil 
Out., to raise $1 1,940 for waterworks 

-inn. 

The ratepayers of Wellington, Out 
will vote on a by-law tor $1,000 for 
sidewalk construction. 

Tlic Portage la Prairie council will 
ask for a granl of (50,000 for the com- 
pletion of the waterworks system. 

\ Wen : liiimtoii steam pump has been 
installed ai Hie Point St. Charles sta- 
tion of the Montreal waterworks. 

The work on the Trent Valley Canal 
has been handed over to the Dominion 
Government by the Ontario Government. 

Chatham. Out ., has lei the conl ract to 
the Colonial Engineering Co., Montreal 
for a complete electric lighting system. 

The Pelham, Out., town council have 
given permission to two power com- 
panies to furnish electricity to that 
town. 

The corporation of Berlin, Out., have 
received permission to acquire the in- 
terests of the Berlin & Waterloo Street 
Railway. 

There is a by-law before the murijei- 
pality of Allistoii, Out., to granl the 
Lloyd & Buchanan Wig. Co. a free site 
and a loan maul of $500. A facboi \ 
will be erected to cost $10,000. 

Railroad Construction. 

The Canadian Northern wiir erect a 
bridge over the Assinibeia river at Win- 
nipeg. 

The G.T.R. have commenced the con- 
struction of the line from Kitamaal to 
Kitsalas Canyon, 1'..''. 

The Canadian Northern have placed 
the contract for two switching locomo- 
tives with the American Locomotive Co. 

Tie- C.I'.K. will erect new roundhouses 
ai Coleridge and St rath con a, Alta.: 
Swift Current. Sask.. and Cranbrook. 
B.C. 

The C.I'.K. has lei the contract for 
the line running northwest from Moose 
Jaw. by way of Lacombe ami Edmon- 
ton. 

The contracl lor the stores building 
to,- the T. & N.O. railroad ai North Bay 
has been let to O'Boyle I'>ro>. Construc- 
tion Co.. North liny. 

The farmers around Goosi !. 

Sa^k.. have given the Canadian N 
em ~>2 miles of free righl of way to run 
a line from Saskatoon to Wigins. 



The Temiskanring and Nor! he 

lam. Railway commissioners recently 

derided to purchase len 1 1 1 ■ w locomotives 

from the Canadian Locomotive < ".. o) 
Kingston. 

The bridge which the C.P.R. proposes 
to build at Letbbridge will be one of the 

si remarkable structures of its kind 

in the world. For two-thirds of its 
length the bridge will be over 300 Feel 
high. There will be 22 spans KM) Peel 
long, I) si\l\ seven feel long and one 
107 feel long. The steel used in its con- 
struction will weigh 10,000 tons and « ill 
be supplied by the Canada Bridge Com- 
pany. Walkerville. Out. 



TIN ORE DISCOVERED IN NOVA 
SCOTIA. 

E. E. Bishop, connected with the well 

known firm of Austen Mils., is the 
owner of a one half interest in the tin 
ore discoverj at Lunenburg, Nova 
Scotia which is attracting wide atten 
tioii. It is the only place in Canada out 
side the Yukon where tin has been 
found, and its occurrence at granite 
uggests the importance of scrutinizing 
carefully the large area of contacts es 
tending through the centre of Nova 
Scotia, and also the great granite in- 
trusions at different districts. Valuable 
discoveries will probably be the result 
of such attention. Mr. Bishop has as- 
sociated with him Messrs. O'Brfen and 
King, of Toronto, whose names are 
identified with the important O'Brien 
mine at Cobalt. The other owner of an 
interest in the tin prospect is the finder, 
Keddy. Development work for investiga 
tion of the deposit is now proceeding, 
and the progress of tin- work will be 
watched with intense interest. Mr. Fari- 
bault, assisted by Mr. Voung of the 

Geological Survey, have 1 n directed 

to study the tin occurrence closelv. and 
arc now on the ground. The (pre is cas 

sitei iic and appears at a dyke of peg 
matite. John Reeves, Benjamin Meis 
ter. E. E. Bishop, and Cbirles Keddv 
took iu> t he areas under I icense to 
search, Oct. 26. 1 006. 



A STOLEN TRADE SECRET. 

The manufacture of tinware in Eng 

land originated in a stolen secret. Mew 
readers need to be informed that tin- 
ware i s simply thin sheet iron plated 
with tin by being dipped into the mol- 
ten metal. In theory it is an easy mat- 
ter to (dean the surface of iron. Dip 
the iron in a bath of boiling tin and 
remove it enveloped in the silvery met 

;il to a place of cooling. I n pra' I I i 

however, the process is one id' the most 

difficult of aits. It was discovered in 

Holland and guarded from publicity 
with the utmost vigilance for nearly 
half a century. England tried to dis- 
cover the secret in vain until .1 
Sherman, a Cornish miner, crossed the 
channel, insinuated himself surrepti 

I ioush into a tin plate niauu'acl orj 
made himself master of the secret and 
brought it home. 



Are you a consistent member of the 
home patronage club ? Do you buv lines 
nol found in your store of your home 
merchant 



Consolidated 

Plate 

Class 

Company 

of Canada 

Limited 



Glazing 
G/ass 



of all kinds 



LOWEST PRICES 
^SK FOR THEM 



Write Nearest Office 



TORONTO 

MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 



52 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BEST ELBOWS 

— FOR — 

CONDUCTOR 
PURPOSES 

BEAR 
TRADE MARK 



Wywnaman^ 



PLAIN ROUND. 

CORRUGATED. 





For Sale by the TRADE 

in Canada. Write for 

catalogue and 

samples to 



Jobbers and 



Ferdinand Dieckmann 

1180-82-84 HARRISON AVE. 

CINCINNATI, 0., U.S.A. 




Pertinent 



Pease 



Points 



t/^r 



<**\s~ 



r»~«*/\j«J 



* 



From January ist to August ist, 1907, many 
more Pease Heaters have been shipped than during 
the same months of any previous year. 



0*" m " / v* 



*/%,. 



•*s\r* 



»<^iW^>iV>»^K i >V>»i^/»»^ 'm x n «</tyw^ 






On August ist, 1907, The Pease Company had 
vastly more orders entered for Fall delivery than 
on the same date in any previous year. 



••s^r 



i 



•»SV 



•^V 



-••^V-O 



* 



At the beginning of August, 1907, The Pease 
Company arc better equipped than ever before 
to fill orders promptly ; to satisfy every require- 
ment of the Heating Trade and to maintain their 
pre-eminent position in the Heating business in I 
Canada. 



f*wtfl»»>»«»^\/«i| i < J ^Wl 



»**Ar—*s\i*+>*f^K++ 



1/ 



We have a new illustrated price list. 
Would you like to have one? 



Pease-Waldon Co., Ltd. Pease Foundry Co., Ltd. 



Winnipeg 

53 



Toronto 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



News of the Paint Trade 



IRON PAINTING. 

There arc nian\ cases of the rusting 
of iron. It may be produced by atmos- 
phere action alone, but in a majority of 
sm plays a large part in the 
ilc-! ruction of tln> metal. Long experi- 
ence lias shown how rapidly iron nails 
employed in fastening sheets of lead and 
Copper upon roots are destroyed, the 
other, the electro-negative metal, remain- 
ing comparatively unaffected. The elec- 
trolyte, or exciting fluid, which by act- 
ing on the iron and not on the other 
metal or by acting more upon the form- 
er than upon the latter, causes the elec- 
tric current, in either actual water from 
rain or snow or the water vapor always 
present in the atmosphere. The decom- 
position of the water causes the libera- 
tion of oxygen at the positive pole, 
which is the iron, and this nascent oxy- 
gen rapidly combines with the iron. Now. 
it is claimed that red lead is an excellent 
material for protecting iron from rust 
ami electrical action. Unfortunately, 
however, red lead is more elect ro- nega- 
tive to iron than either copper or lead. 
Hence, should moisture by any chance 
pel between the red lead and the iron, 
the destruction by rust is more rapid 
than when iron is in contact with cop- 
per or lead. This electro-chemical ac- 
tion i- at the same time strengthened by 
the purely chemical action between the 
red lead and the carhonic acid always 
present in the air. an action which con- 
verts the red lead into ceruse, whereby 
an additional quantity of nascent oxy- 
gen is set free to rust the iron. Tt is. 
also highly probable that the carbonic 
acid lias an independent action upon the 
iron, thereby much facilitating its oxida- 
tion. It must not be forgotten that, 
every pomus place and still more every 
crack in the paint becomes sooner or 
later an entrance for water and car- 
honic acid. A good oil varnish is by far 
the hest protection for iron, hut it must, 
of coarse, he properly used. Not only 
must the iron he scrupulously, practical- 
ly and chemically (dean and dry when 
(lie varnish is applied, hut the covering 
must he without a flaw. Varnish will 
not adhere to greasy, rusty, or wet iron. 
r.nd the contraction of the varnish on 
drying will cause minute cracks at such 
places and the iron-destroying gases 
will find their way through these cracks 
and gel between the iron and the non- 
adherent varnish. Building Manage- 
ment. 



AUSTRALIAN WHITE LEAD RUL- 
ING. 
The following notification was recent- 
ly issued from the Commonwealth Gov- 
ernmenl office in London: "A recent im- 
portation of 'white lead' was described 
on the kegs as 'Ground white lead re- 
duced.' Analysis showed that the white 
lead was adulterated with barium to 
the extent of aboul 25 per cent. The 



LOOK 

in our Trade Catalogue No. 10. page 
33, and read on the sign 

"Imperial Aluminum Paint Does It" 

These five words put the story in a 
nutshell. It does anything Aluminum 
Paint is supposed to do, and does it so 
well, we, our agents , and their custom- 
ers are all satisfied. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, CANADA. 

Stocks at 

WINNIPEG, MAN., c/o MASON & HICKEY. 
VANCOUVER, B.C., c/o DURAND MERCHANDISE CO. 



LIMITED 



BRONZE POWDER and BRONZE LIQUIDS 



ARE GUARANTEED WHEN MADE BY 



The Canadian Bronze Powder Works 

Backed by long: experience, R. E. Thorne & Co. have unsurpassed facilities for 
filling: orders at short notice. Write for particulars. 



MONTREAL 

NO ORDER TOO LARGE. 



— TORONTO 

EXTENSIVE WORKS AT VALLEYFIELD, QUE 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

axe unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 




To be obtained from the principal Dealers in Glass, Hardware, and Painters' Supplies. 

Contractors to H. M. Government and the principal English Shoot and Plato Glass 

Works 



GlLBERTSO]V;s_ 

c omeT' 



Gilbertson's Sheets 

and tho COMET Brand 

mean quality and security in whatever work 
you may undertake. 

Galvanized flat sheets that are unequalled as 
to flatness ; absolute triteness to gauge ; admir- 
ably suited in softness for any working. Note 
the brand "COMET." GILBERTSON on 
every sheet means security. 
W GILBERTSON & CO., Limited, Ponta-dawi. South Walts 

ALEX. 6IBB, 13 St. Join St., Montreal. Agei) 



54 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



YOUR CUSTOMERS LIKE 

a paint that keeps up its good appearance. They won't come back to your store if you sell them a paint which fades 
quickly. Your safest plan is always to recommend 

NEW ERA PAINT 

You'll be sure then of permanent customers who will reflect their pleasure by increased orders. 

STANDARD PAINT AND VARNISH WORKS CO., LIMITED 



WINDSOR 



ONTARIO 



REPEAT ORDERS 
ARE COMING IN 

every day for 

JAMESON'S 

FLOOR ENAMEL 

We have made it as 
perfect as we know how 
and do not believe it 
can be improved on at 
any price. 

Order on a small lot to 
try it. You will then 
know how pleasant it 
is to sell something 
really good for a floor. 
People will take the 
trouble to call back to 
tell you how well satis- 
fied they are. They 
are doing it now as we 
know from many re- 
ports received. 

Manufactured by 

R. C. JAMIESON & GO. 

LIMITED 

16-30 NAZARETH STREET 
MONTREAL 

Write for prices and show card. 



HEADQUARTERS 



FOR 



Window Glass, 
Paints, Oils, 

Fine Varnishes 

SANDERSON PEARCY & CO., Ltd. 

Toronto, Canada 




STOVE PIPE 




SCHEIP'S 
PATENT NESTED 

25 lengths in crate 

We also 

manufacture 

a full line 

of Cooper's 

Elbows. 

The Best 

on 

the Market. 



This is the only perfect working Knock Down Pipe made, will not telescope. 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., HAMILTON, ONT. 




GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS OF PROVED WORTH 

Having a Century's Reputation for Reliability. 
MADE BY 



A. SMANA/ St SON. L_o 

CANADIAN AGENT 



ndon. En 



GODFREY 8. PELTON, - 201 Coristine Building, Montrea 

55 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



I'-i'ih • il' Joes 

sufficieutlj describe 'adulteration' foi 
the purpose of the Commerce Act, al- 
though in the trade it lias that meaning. 
In future, the percentage <>f barium, or 
other adulterant in white lead) must 
- clearly and as permanently shown 
on the covering of the goods as the or 
dinar} trade description applied t] 
to, and delivery is not to be permitted 
until this condition is fulfilled." 
The Melbourne Journal of I 

says: '-It is satisfactory to be 



able t«i report anenl the recent agitation 
turainsl alleged adulterated white lead, 
that an analysis of samples drawn from 
-i\ different shipments of various brands 
by the customs department has satisfied 

the authorities that they were pure, some 
of them going as high as 96 per cent. 
carbonate lead. The customs departi 

has. however, notified that it will not bo 
sufficient t>> state that "ii mixed lead 
that it is •reduced.' The proportion of 
i lie mixture must be specified plainly on 
packages." 



Paint and Oil Markets 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal \ugust l(i.— Market Condi 
i urns on t lie whole are quite sal 
torj imiioi t.uit contracts have been 
placed in Montreal during the pasl week 
These include mixed paints and special 
contracts tor corporations. '1'he activi- 
tj referred to last week is being well 
maintained, and a general feeling of sat- 
isfaction amongst manufacturers exists 
in regard to the amount of business be- 
ing done. No changes of importance, 
with the exception of linseed oil, have 
been made. 

Linseed Oil— This continues to slowly 
weaken. Prices this week are marked 
down 2c. The new prices are : Haw, 1 
to 1 barrels, 60c . 5 in w, 59c; hoiled, 1 
to 4 barrels, 63c; 5 to !), 6 

Turpentine — Has taken an upward turn 
after the long period of depression. Con- 
ditions at Savannah are much improved. 
Local quotations are unchanged : Single 
barrels, 80c. 

Ground White Lead— Js in rather lid 
ter demand. Local corroding work is 
fully implied, and grinders find it mov- 
tnore steadily. Prices are firm : 
Government standard, $7.50 ; No. 1, $7 ; 
No. 2. <'..;."> ; \o. 3, St;.:i5. 
l)i \ White Zinc— The situation is un- 
"il : t he demand is moderate and 
prices are firm: V.M. Red Seal, TAc; 
Red Seal. 7c; French V.M., 6c; Lehigh, 
5c. 

While Zinc Ground in Oil— The demand 
is steadv with unchanged prices: Pure, 
S T o. 1, 7c; No. 2," a^c. 
Red Lead— The volume of business 
omewhal dimished. 
Prices are firm and unchanged : Genuine 
led lead, in casks, S6.25 ; in LOO-fo. 
50 .n less quantities at $7.25 
' o. 1 red lead, casks. SG 
•id smaller quantities, $7. 
Gum Shellac— Prices are linn and un- 
changed. During the summer se 
little demand i^ expected, and condi- 
ip to expectations. Fine 

orange, 60c. per li,.; medium oral 
per tb.; white (bleached i, 65c 

Sheii.,c Varnish — The demand is 
steady and prices are fit m and unci 
ed : Pure White h -h 

pure oiai (I ; No. 1 i -i. Hi. 

Putty— G-rindi .er\ bus} supply- 

ing tii'- demand, which continues strong. 
re unchanged Pure lin eed oil, 
M .85 hulk : in ba 60 : in 2.".-ll). 

$1.90 ; in tins, $2 ; bladder putty, 
in barrel 

Paris Green— The season is now prac- 



tically o\ei and slocks are almost GS 
hausted. While it lasted a large volume 
oi business was done in this commodity. 
The season, however, was of short 
ilm.ii inn owing to lateness of spring, 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, August 16. — A fair August 
business is being transacted, but com- 
pared with a few weeks ago trade is 
lather inactive. Jobbers do not expeel 
to be rushed at this season of tire year 
and apparently are satisfied with the 
amount of mid-August trade tlnat is 
coming in. The sale of mixed paints is 
largely over for this season, and the en- 
quiries that are now coming in are 
mostly for small quantities to enable 
retailers to sort up their stocks in those 
colors in which they are low. Despite 
the continued cool weather of the early 
summer, this has been a splendid sea- 
son for the sale of paints and oils ; in 
fact, the managers of local supply 
In, uses are quite gratified by the amount 
of business that has been done. 

White Lead— A few enquiries are com- 
ing in and trade is all that can be ex- 
pected for \ugust. Prices remain linn 
.mil unchanged as follows : Genuine pure 
white lead is quoted at $7.65, and No. 1 
is held at $7.25. 

Red Lead— \ fair amount of orders 
foi red lead in sorting quantities con- 
tinue to arrive. There are no altera- 
tions in prices which are still quoted as 
follows : Genuine, in casks of 500 His., 
$6.25 ; ditto, in kegs of till! lbs., $(,.75 ; 
No. I, in casks of 500 fts., $5; ditto 
in Icegs of 100 His., $5.50. 

Paris Green— The season is now prac 
ticallj over, though the hot weather 
which prevailed during the first part of 
the week had the effect of temporarily 
Stimulating the demand, and even vet a 
few repeat orders continue to conic in 
from various parts of the province. 
Prices are unchanged and are quoted as 
follows : Canadian Paris green, 29£c. 
base , English Paris green, 30£c. 

Petroleum— The .demand is a trifle 

' ro'uger hut has not vet increased suffi- 
ciently to warrant anj chartge in prices. 
Prime white. 13c; watei \\ hite I4ic 
Pratt's astral, 18c. 

Shellac— Trade in shellac is quiet as 
ii usually is at this time in August. 
There are no changes in prices. Pure 
orange, in barrels, $2.70 ; white, $2.,K2. 1 , 
!"•' barrel . No. l, (orange), $2.50. 

Turpentine— Local juices are fairl} 
iy, though fine firm is quot in ; - 




Paint 
Salesmen! 

Did it 
ever 
, occur 
to you 



That you often put a great deal 
of effort into selling a paint that 
requires hard pushing, and then 
without even a sign of the looked 
for repeat order. 



ORDERS FOR 



ii 



M 



ENGLISH 

LIQUID 
HOUSE PAINT 



like History, repeat themselves, 
and the first can is not hard to 
sell. 

"The Paint is known" 



DRANDHAM-UENDERSON, 

Ummmmmmmmml ■■■^■■iiMitED 



MANUFACTURERS 

Montreal, Halifax 
St. John, Winnipeg 



( * b. b. y 

;,\VVHITl. LEADy'i? 



Marshall- Well* 

Company,'; 
Wlnnlptg, 

8<>!o distributors 

I.., Western 

Cans.ls 



56 



Hardware and Metal 



• PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TR U 




. 



Conic to us for all kinds of glass. Let us 
quote you on every specification. We have 
immense stocks in our large new warehouses. 

Star Window Glass 
Diamond Picture Glass 
Double Diamond Glass 
Colored Glass 
Rolled Glass 
Cathedral Glass 
Wire Glass 

Heavy 26 oz. 32 oz. Glass 
and Glass of all kinds. 

LET US QUOTE 



A. RAMSAY & SON COMPANY 



Class 
Dealers 



.MONTREAL 



lO to 22 
Inspector St. 



"One Pint of Gasolene will make 

200 Cubic Feet of Air Explosive" 

Consulting- Engineers, Boards of Fire Underwriters, 

That's the reason 
the Bowser System of 
Gasolene Storage is 
so unqualifiedly en- 
dorsed by insurance 
authorities. The 
Bowser is absolutely 
evaporation proof, and 
is the only arrange- 
ment possible to 
secure that is. We 
will prove it if you 
write us. 

Ask for Catalog V2. 




Cut 42 
LONC DI8TANCE OUTFIT 



S. F. BOWSER & CO., Limited 



66-68 Fraser Ave. 



Toronto, Can. 



BERRY BROTHERS' VARNISHES 



are one grand story of success 



BECAUSE THEY ARE THE BEST 

They are the safest goods to handle, 
and the most reliable goods to use. 

Write for Catalogue, Information and Prices. 



BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 



NEW YORK 
BOSTON 
PHILADELPHIA 
BALTIMORE 



Varnish Manufacturers 

DETROIT 

Canadian Factory— WALKERVILLE, OMT. 



CHICAGO 
CINCINNATI 
ST. LOUIS 
SAN FRANCISCO 



57 



paint, oil and brush trades 



Hardware am! Metal 



cent lower than the market. On accounl 
i telegraph operators' sinkc, it is 
imp! report the iatesl develop- 

ments ol the southern market, but the 
List intelligence received i>y letter was 
e effect thai the market there had 
sii^ht!> declined Last year turpentine 
ancc in July and the up- 
ward movement ol prices continued till 
Kcptemhei . so tar there has been no 
corresponding advance this year, but 
late!) prices in the south have been 
fluctuating up ami down to such an ex- 
tent that it is exceedingly difficult to 
give a reliable forecast of the market. 
The local demand is good for this tine 

of the yeai and the following are the 
prevailing prices: single bands, 79c; 
two barrels and upwards, 7Se. f.o.b. 
point of shipment, net 30 days ; less 
than barrels, 5c. advance. Terms: 2 
per cent . 30 days. 

Linseed Oil— The Canadian market has 
been considerably undermined by large 
importations of English oil at Montreal. 
and consequently, a two cent drop has 
resulted locally, though a few- dealers 
aie still quoting last, week's figures. 
We now quote : Raw, 1 to 3 barrels, 
63c; 1 barrels and o\er, 62c Add 3c. 
to this price for boiled oil f.o.b. Toron- 
to, Hamilton, Loudon and Ouelph, 30 
days. 

For additional prices see current mar- 
ket quotations at the back of the paper. 

MAKING ZINC-LEAD PIGMENT. 

In the manufacture of zinc-lead pig- 
ment all grades of ore can be used, vary- 
ing from those containing no lead 
up to those containing equal propor- 
tions of zinc and lead. It has been found 
by mixing ores from various districts 
that an average will contain one-third 
lead and two-thirds zinc. From such a 
charge a pigment is produce. 1 containing 
\,i\ nearly one-third basic lead sulphate 
ami two-thirds /inc oxide. In preparing 
the charge, Ores high in lead are mixed 
with ores low in lead, the amount of lead 
that may be used being calculated from 
the zinc content as a basis. 

The ores, says Win. F. Gordon, in the 
Engineering and Mining Journal, are 
sized ami carefully roasted to a proper 
sulphur content, the amount of sulphur 
lefl in the ore depending on the amount 
needed to combine with the lead to form 
basic lead sulphate. 

Alter roasting, the ore is taken to 
I lie pigment furnaces, and the zinc and 
l,. : id are volatilized, the zinc going 
through the reaction as above described, 
and producing zinc oxide. The lead, 
which theoretically should also produce 
;in oxide, doe- nol do so, but unites 
with the sulphur left in the ore and 
forms basic lead sulphate. I have 
studied this phenomenon to a consider- 
able extent, and am of the opinion that 
the lead i> also volatilized ami. having 
i greater affinity for sulphur than for 
ixygen, combine- as the sulphate. The 
in for ao believing is thai an ore 
charge of zinc ami lead carbonate may 
be used and sufficient sulphur iii form 
of iro,, pyrite be added. It is hardly 
probable that a chemical combination 
- place between the lead as carbon- 



ale, and the sulphur in the pyrite before 
they are volatilized. 

After passing from the pigment fur- 
naces the floating zinc and lead is con- 
ducted as in the zinc oxide process to 
the bag room. In Ibis process about 
150 Square feet of muslin in the bag 
t'OOlU is used for every square foot of 
grate surface in the pigment furnaces. 

In concluding his article on this sub- 
jeel Mr. Gordon says: 

"The zinc-lead pigment is one of great 
beauty. lis covering capacity is equal 
to the same amounts of white lead 
(carbonate) and zinc oxide. Since 
neither the zinc oxide nor lead sulphate 
is affected by atmospheric conditions it 
is very durable It does not darken by 
contact with sulphur gases, and there- 
fore holds ils color in coal burning 
cities." 



Marine Paints 



TESTS FOR LUBRICATING OILS. 

The viscosity and other characteristics 
of oils used for lubricating form the 
subject for frequent experiment, and the 
use of viscometers is extending. Accord- 
ing to a daily paper, the simplest means 
of testing the viscosity of an oil is to 
measure (he relative time taken for the 
oil and water to flow through an orifice. 
Accurate tests of the viscosities of oil 
as compared with water have shown 
that sperm oil is one of the least viscous, 
and rape seed oil is about double that 
of sperm. Moisture in oil, which is 
especially objectionable for oil cooled 
transformers, may be readily detected 
by immersing a hot wire in the oil when, 
if there be moisture present, a crackling 
sound will be heard, and simply a puff 
of smoke if the oil is dry. 



A NEW LUBRICANT. 

Bean cake is an important production 
in Japan and China. It is used chiefly 
for fertilizing, and to some extent for 
the feeding of live stock. Bean oil is 
also an important article of commerce. 
Whether bean oil is a by-product of the 
manufacture of bean-cake, or vice versa. 
is a question that is answered differently 
by different people. But a consular re- 
port from Mukden is authority for the 
statement that "one of the principal ex- 
ports of Manchuria is bean oil, whose 
use al the present time is largely for il- 
luminating and cooking purposes. The 
manager of the Mitsui Bussan PCaisha 
at Tieling, however, believes that by 
combining it with a small percentage of 
some other oil it will be possible to pro- 
duce a very satisfactory and cheap lub- 
ricant, and states that his company is 
al present performing experiments to 

that end." 




To remove oil paint from tin goods in 
(he ease of fresh paint, rub off with oil 

of turpentine or petroleum. Otherwise, 

use hot, saturated solution of potash, 
hot water afterward. The most power 
fid means is caustic soda lye. 

58 



The 

Canada Paint Co. 

Limited 

Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Manufacturers of 

Yacht 

and 

Vessel 
Paints 

Munro's Copper Paint 
Mast Paint 
" Amberlte" Pale Spar Varnish 
"Ambcrite" Copal Boat Varnish 
" Amberite " Saloon Cabin Finish 
Marine Enamels 
Marine Black 
Marine Smoke Stack Black 
Marine Creen 

Marine Bright Red 
Marine Cabin Paint 
Marine Cabin Stains 
Marine Engine Paint 

Marine Smoke Stack Red 
Ozonized Deck Paint 
Decorator's Paint 

All our manufactures are 
thoroughly tested by expert 
workmen before shipping 

For further particulars see 
catalogue 



Hardware mid Metal 



l'MNT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



DON'T SELL PAINT 
THAT 18 CHEAP AND 

INFERIOR. The Falcon 
Brand for paints and 
varnishes, etc., means 
that they are not only 
good, but that they are 
the very highest grade 
that up-to-date paint 
making can produce. 
There's good money in it for you. 

Send us a sample order and we will prove our statement. 

PHASANTITE 

an ideal water paint. 

FALCONITE 

White Enamel of high-grade. 

LACKER ITE 

Our new Varnish Stains in 12 colors. 




Wilkinson, Hey wood & Clark, Limited 

EST. 1796 

300 Notre Dame St., MONTREAL 

Branches and agencies all over the world. 
FRANCIS C. REYNOLDS, Can. Manager. 



Any manufacturer can 
make a green paint. 
But there is only ONE 

IMPERIAL 

FRENCH GREEN 



It lasts years longer 
than any other green. 
Does not lose its 
brilliancy. Be sure the 
label has the name of 

LUCAS 



PHILADELPHIA 
BOSTON 



NEW YORK CHICAGO 

SAN FRANCISCO 



A Money Consideration 

There are few other considerations worth serious thought when 
it comes down to business, unless it be the securing of one's reputa- 
tion. Perhaps this accounts for the unprecedented success of our 

VARNISM TURPENTINE 

but we are inclined to favor the belief that it captured the market 
because of merit and merit alone. We guarantee our Varnish 
Turpentine will do any work that spirits of turpentine will do, and 
do it better. Send for a barrel of our turpentine, test it as you please, 
and if it is not satisfactory return it at our expense. Is that fair ? 

The Defiance Mfg. ®> Supply Co. 

TORONTO .... ONTARIO 



59 



PAINT, OIL \\n BRUSH TRADES Hardtvare and Metal 




TI1C NAME 

"bland City" 

on a Paint Can, 
means that that can contains 

The Highest duality Paint 

that can be manufactured. 

It means that that paint is what your customer wants, and that by giving him 
what he wants, when he wants it, you are making a good commission for yourself. 

Give our line a trial, you'll not regret it. 

Eight hours is all that is neccessary for the "Is/and City" brand of Floor 
Paints to dry. 

Our Travellers get all the credit of orders sent in from their ground. 

P. D. DODS £> CO. - MONTREAL 

VANCOUVER TORONTO WINNIPEG 



I 






Growth of Canada's Export 

Trade. 

Value of Annual Exports from Canada : 

1886— S85,251,314.00 1896— $118,011,508.00 1906— $256,586,630.00 

What is YOUR share of this ever-increasing business ? 

THE BEST WAY to reap the profits of foreign trade is through the unique foreign trade service of the 

AMERICAN EXPORTER 

HALE A THOUSAND Manufacturers use this method of reaching the buyers abroad. Among them : 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Limited - -Montreal Qoold, Shapley & Muir Co. - - - Brantford 

Waterous Engine Works Co. - - Brantford Brantford Carriage Co. - - Brantford 

Canada Horse Nail Co. ... -Montreal Metallic Roofing Co. ... -Toronto 

Sylvester Bros. Mfg. Co. - - - Lindsay Page Wire Fence Co., Limited - - Walkerville 

|^" ANNUAL HARDWARE NUMBER PUBLISHED AUGUST 1st «d 

AMERICAN EXPORTER 

Established 187? Conducted by Export Specialists 

135 William Street, New York City, U.S.A. 



60 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



ASBESTOS 

STOVE LINING 

Mr. Dealer ! It's up to you to handle the best 
Floor Lining on the market. Our Asbestos 
Lining has proven itself a more durable and econ- 
omical lining for Cooking and Heating Stoves, 
Grates, Ranges, Hot Air Furnaces than Fire Brick 
and is especially adapted for Grates, Ranges, etc. 
where natural gas is used. Fits any stove ; can 
be applied by any one in a few minutes. 

Put up In 6 lb Packages and Bulk. 

ASBESTO FIREPROOF 
FURNACE CEMENT 

is used for mounting and repairing Furnaces, 
Ranges, Heaters, Stoves, etc., makinf them gas- 
tight. Always ready for use ; adheres firmly to 
the castings and sets in a few hours as hard as 
iron. Odorless and cannot be injured by acids 
or chemicals. A thoroughly satisfying Furnace 
Cement and a profitable line. 

BENJAMIN MOORE & CO., Limited 

(Formerly The Francis-Frost Co., Limited) 

New Offices and Works : Toronto Junction, Canada 

New York, Chicago, Cleveland, Carteret, N. J. 



Hygienic Sanitation 

CAN BE OBTAINED BY 
USING MACFARI^N^ 

%,J Gi^55 Enamelled 
Drain &-Sotl Pipes 

WHICH ARE KECOMMENDED 
AND SPECIFIED BY THE 

LEADING SANITARY- 
IjpM^AmHORITIrg ^ 

Sanitary Engineer SARACEN FOUNDRY 

CASTINGS SUPPLIED CUT RUTTED ^^■■■■■"•■M* I WlfnirHI| 




TO REQUIRED MEASUREMENTS 
DRAINAGE PLANS ARRANGCO 
CATALOGUE} ON APPLICATION. 



AGENTS : 
W. PORTEOUS JACK, 1256 Robson, Vancouver. 
GEO. PEATT & CO., P. O. Box 466, Winnipeg, Man. 
BAXTER, PATERSON & CO., 102 St. Antoine St., Montreal. 




Must be accomplished by right methods. Progressive 
merchandising requires powerful and direct advertising of 
you and your business. If you would like to secure the 
co-operation of one of the oldest and largest paint manu- 
facturing concerns in the world in giving you a bigger 
reputation as a live, up-to-date dealer, increasing your busi- 
ness and helping you 



To MaKe More Money 

this season than ever before in your business history all you have to do is to sit 
down and write to the makers of Martin-Senour Paint 
100f Pure. Ask us for our special proposition to 
agents and how we advertise dealers who handle our 
goods. We'll tell you something to your advantage. 

The MARTIN-SENOUR CO. Ltd., 

"Pioneers of Pure Paints" 
142-144 Inspector Street, Montreal. 
2514-2522 Quarry St. and Archer Ave.. Chicago. (Est. 1878.) 



The Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co. Ltd., 
Winnipeg. 



The Maritime Faint & Varnish Co. Ltd., 
Halifax, N. 3. 



6i 




11 A R D \\ A R E A N D METAL 



WE Cldim to give all round satisfaction to you and yOUT customers. 
BLACK DIAMOND Tarred Felt sells easily always. 

When once used the satisfaction is established, because every part of the paper is alive with uuality. All our 
lines have the same strong pulling power, and you should get after this trade in your district. 

OUR WRAPPING PAPER HAS NO RIVAL ON THE MARKET, ASK FOR THE BRAND. 



Our Brands 



^ 



Black Diamond 
Tarred Felt 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



Joliette and Cyclone 
Sheathing 



Alex, McArtKur (EX Co., Limited, 



82 McGill St. 
Montreal 



F. J. COX. 'Winnipeg, Solo Agent for Northwest Provinces 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



August 16, 1907 
These prices are (or such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

ANTIMONY. 

Oookson's per lb 15 

Halletts 141 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES. 
Plates, i to \ inch, per 100 lb.. 2 40 2 50 

Heads, per 100 lb 2 65 2 75 

Tank plates 3-16 inch 2 60 2 ' 

Tubes per 100 feet, 1} inch . . 8 25 8 50 

2 " .. 9 (0 9 10 
21 " .. 10 5J 11 00 

3 " .. 12 0" 12 50 
31 ' .. 15 00 16 00 

4 " . . 19 25 20 00 
BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned and Spun. 25 oer cent, off list. 
BABBIT METAL. 

Canada Met al Company— Imperial, genuine 
60c.; Imperial Tough, 66c; White Brass. 50c.; 
Metallic. 25c. ; Harris Heavy Pressure, 25c,: 
Hercules, 25c ; White Bronze, 15c; Star 
Frictionless, 14c ; Alluminoid, 10c; No. 4, 
9c. per lb. 

James Robertson Co.— Extra and genuine 
Monarch, 60c; Crown Monarch, 50c ; No. 1 
Monarch. 40c; King, 30c ; Fleur-de-lis, 20c ; 
Thurber, 15o.; Philadelphia, 12c ; Canadian, 
10c ; hardware, No. 1, 15c; No, 2, 12c ; No. 3, 
lOo. per lb. 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 25 p. c. advance. 

Sheets, 12 to 14 in 30 

Tubing, base, per lb 5-16 to 2 in 33 

Tubing. I to 3-inch, iron pipe size. . 31 

" I to 3-inch, seamless 36 

Copper tubing, 6 cents extra. 

COPPER. Per 100 lb. 

Casting ingot 22 50 23 50 

Cut lengths, round, bars, 1 to 2 in. . . 35 00 

Plain sheets, 14 oz 36 00 

Plain, 16 oz„ 14x48 and 14x60 .... 35 00 

Tinned copper sheet, base 38 00 

Planished base 43 00 

Braziers' (in Bheets). »x6 ft., 25 

to 30 lb. each, per lb., base . . 34 35 
BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

to 10 gauge 2 70 2 75 

12gauge 2 70 2 75 

14 " 2 50 2 60 

17 " 2 50 2 60 

18 " 2 50 2 60 

20 " 2 50 2 CO 

22 " 2 55 2 65 

24 " 2 55 2 70 

26 " 2 65 2 85 

28 " 2 70 3 00 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 2 75 3 0" 

All bright " 3 75 4 05 

Galvanized— Dom. Crown. Ordinary. 

18x^4x52 4 45 4 35 

60 4 70 4 60 

20x28x80 8 90 8 70 

9 40 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Colborn. 
Crown 
B W. Queen's Fleur- Gordon Oorhal's 
gauge Head de-Lis Crown Best 
16 -20 .. 3 95 3 80 3 95 



22 - 24 . . 4 20 4 05 4 00 4 05 

26 4 45 4 30 4 40 4 30 

28 4 70 4 55 4 60 4 55 

Less than case lots 10 to 25c. extra. 
Apollo Brand. 

24 guage, American 3 85 

26 " " 4 10 

28 " " 4 55 

101 oz 4 85 

25c. less for 1,000 lb. lots. 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Montreal. Toronto. 

Middlesboro, No. 1 pig iron. .21 50 21 50 

Middlesboro, No 3 pig iron 2" 50 23 50 

Summerlee, " .25 f.0 26 50 

special " . 24 50 

soft " . 24 00 

Carron 26 00 

Carron Special 24 5U 

Carron Soft 24 00 

Clarence, No. 3 21 50 23 50 

Olengarnock, No. 1 27 CO 

Midland, Londonderry and 
Hamilton, off the market 

but quoted nominally at 26 00 

Radnor, charcoal iron 32 00 34 ' 

Common bar, per 100 lb 2 20 2 30 

L^wmoor iron 6 50 

Angles 2 50 

Forged iron ' 2 45 

Refined " " 2 60 2 70 

Horseshoe iron " 2 GO 2 70 

Band iron. No. 13 x i in 3 60 

Sleigh shoe steel " .... 2 25 2 30 

Iron finish steel 2 40 

Reeled machinery steel 3 50 

Tiresteel 2 40 2 50 

Best Bheet steel 12 

Mining caBt steel 08 

Warranted cast steel 14 

Annealed cast steel 15 

Highspeed 60 

B.P.L. 'ool steel ... 101 11 

INGOT TIN. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $42 00 #44 00 

TINPLATES. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 
M.L.S., Famous (equal Bradleyl Per box 

10,14 x 20 base $6 50 

IX. 14x20 " 8 00 

IXX, 14x20baBe 9 50 

Bavea and Vulture Grades— 

10, 14 x 20 base 5 00 

IX " B 00 

IXX " 7 CO 

[XXX " 8 00 

'Dominion Crown Best "—Double 

Coated, TiBSued. Per box. 

I C.14x20 base 5 50 5 75 

IX. 14x20 " 6 50 6 75 

IXX x20" 7 50 7 75 

"Allaway's Best"— Standard Quality. 

I C, 14 i 20 base 4 85 5 00 

IX. 14x20 ' 5 40 5 75 

I XX, 14x20 " 6 15 6 50 

Bright Cokes. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.O., 14x20 base 4 25 4 35 

20x28, double box 8 50 8 70 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.O., 20x28, 112 Bheets .... 7 25 8 00 

IX., Terne Tin 9 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56. 50 Bheet bis.-) 

" 14x60, " >■ .... 7 50 
" 14x65, " J 



Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 8 50 

" " 26 " 9 00 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 5 25 5 35 

Bar, " 5 75 6 00 

Sheets, 2} lb. sq. ft., by roll 6 50 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 6 25 

Cut Bheets Jo per lb., extra. 

SHEET ZINC. 

5-cwt. casks 7 75 8 00 

Part casks 8 00 8 25 

ZrNC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 75 7 00 

Domestic f0 75 

COLD ROLLED SHAFTING. 

9-16 to 11-16 inch 06 

J to 17-16 •' 05J 

1 7-16 to 3 " 05 

30 per cent. 

OLD MATERIAL. 
Dealers buying prices: 

Montreal Toronto 

Heavy copp t and wire, lb. 17 n 15 

Light copper 15 13 

Heavy red brass 15 13 

' yellow b ass 12 10.'. 

Lightbrass 08 00> 

Tea lead 03J 03J 

Heavy lead u4 04 

Scrap zinc 03J OiJ 

No. 1 wrought iron 15 50 1150 

"2 '• - 6 tC 6 00 

Machinery cast scrap ... 17 00 16 50 

Stove plate 13 CO 12 00 

Malleable and uteel 8 00 8 0) 

Old rubbers 10J 10 

Country mixed rags, 100 lbs. 100 125 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 

BRASS OOOD8, VALVE*", ETC. 

Standard Compression work, 57i per cer.t. 
Cushion work, discount 4J per cent. 
Fuller work, 70 per cent. 
Flatway stop and stop and waste cooks, 60 

per cent. ; roundway, 55 per cen*. 
J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

45 ; Standard, 55 pei cent 
Kerr standard globes, angles and checks, 

special, 42J percent.; standard, 474 p.c 
Kerr JenkinA' disc, copper-alloy disc and 

heavy standard valves, 40 per cent. 
Kerr steam radiator valves 60 p.c, and quick- 

opening hot-water radiator valves, 60 p.c. 
Kerr brass, Webers straightway valves, 

4i; straightway valvea, IB i .M , 60. 
J. M. T. Radiator Valves 50; Standard, 60; 

Patent Uuii-.k -Openinir Valves. 65 p <■ 
Jenkins' Valvea Quotations on application 

to Jenkins' Hros., Montreal 

No 1 eompresuon bath QOuH let 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No 7 Fuller's " 2 25 

No. 4 J, " " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, i er dcz $16. 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, 50 ; iron, 60 p.c. 
Thompson Smoke-test Machine 25.UU 

BOILERS— COPPER RANGE 
Ooppe*, 30 gallon, 833, 15 per cent. 

BOILERS— OALVANIZED IRON RANOE. 

30-gallon, Standard, $5; Extra heavy, $7.75 



BATH TUBS. 
Steel clad copper lined, 15 per cent. 

CAST IRON SINKS. 

16x24, SI; 18x30, $1; 18x36, $1.30. 

ENAMELED BATHS, ETt:. 

List issued by the Standard Ideal Com- 
pany Jan. 3, 1907, shows an advance of 10 per 
cent, over previous quotations. 

ENAMELED CLOSETS AND URINALS 

Discount 15 per cent. 

HEATING APPARATUS. 

Stovei and Ranges— 40 to 70 per cent. 

Furnaces— 45 per cent. 

Registers — 70 per cent. 

Hot Water Boilers— 50 per cent. 

H'it Water Radiators— 50 to 55 p.c 

Steam Radiators— 50 to 5) i er cent. 

Wail Radiators and t^pecials — 50 to 55 p.c. 

LEAD PIPE 

Lead Pipe, 5 p.c. off. 
Lead wante, 6 p.c. off. 
' aidking lead, 6Jc. per pound. 
Traps and bends, 40 per cent. 





IRON PIPE. 




Size (per 


100 ft.) Blaok. 


Galvanized 


J inch 


2 35 i inch. 


3 20 


l 


2 35 i " . 


3 20 


i " 


2 90 I " . 


3 75 


4 


3 90 ! " . 


5 00 


1 " 


5 «0 1 " . 


7 25 




7 65 1J " . 

9 30 1} " . 


9 90 


11 90 


5 " 


12 25 2 " . 


15 80 


2} " 




26 00 


3 " 


26 75 3 " . 


34 00 


3} " 


34 25 31 " . 


42 75 


4 " 


39 00 4 " . 


48 60 



Malleable Fittings— Canadian discount 30 per 
cent.; American discount 25 per cent. 

Cast Iron Fittings 574 1 Standard bushings 
57J.; headers, 571; flanged unions 571, mal- 
leable bushings 55 ; ninnies, 70 and 10 ; 
malleable lipped unions, 55 and 5 p.c. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 

Medium and Ettra heavy nipe and fittings, 

up to 6 inch, 60 and 10 to 70 per cent. 
7 and 8-in. pipe. 40 and 5 per cent. 
Light pipe, 50 p.c. ; fittings, 50 and 10 p.c 

OAKUM. 

Plumbers per 10J lb 4 50 5 00 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 

SOLDERING IRONS 

1-lb. to H per lb. 451 48 

2-lb. or over " u 421 46 

SOLDER. Per lb. 

Montreal Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 25 26 
Wiping 22 23 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

HRUHH18 

Paint and household, 70 per cent.. 

CHEMICALS. 

In cisks per lb. 
Sulphate of copper (bluestone or blue 

vitrol) 09 

Litharge, ground 06 

Haked ... 064. 

(;reen conperas (green vitrol) 01 

Sugar of lead 08 

Lump olive 01 i 

colors in on- 
Venetian red, 1-lb. tins pure. U 0b 

Ohrome yellow " 16 

Golden ochre " t 11 

French " " 08 

Marine black 04 1 

Ohrome green " .... C'J 

French permanent green" .... 13 

Signwriters' blaok " .... " \t 



62 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLAUSS BRAND BARBER'S SHEARS 



Fully Warranted 




Solid Steel and Steel Faced. Hand forged 
from Finest Steel. These Shears are es- 
pecially tempered for the purpose they are 
intended. 

FULL NICKEL PLATE FINISH. Write for Trade Discounts 

The Clauss Shear Co., Toronto, Ont, 



GLUE. 

Domestic sheet 010 ° }°? 

Frenoh medal ° 12 ° 12 * 

PARIS GREEN. 

Bergers CaDadian 

600-lb. e»«k •••! 27* 

2501b.druni8 28 «JJ 

Tib :: :::::::::::::::: °m o^ 

l.jb.pkg.,lCOinbox 30 29} 

T-ib. un.. ioo inbox' :::::: oai om 

",-lb. tins »t 6i 

PARIS WHITE. 
Inbbls ° u 

PIGMENTS. 

Orange mineral, casks i ... 18 

100-lb. kegs 08, 

PREPARED PAINTS. 

Barn(inbbls.) 65 90 

Sberwin-Willianispainte J J' 

Canada Paint Co.s pure ...... ••.,■ J *> 

Standard P. * V. Co.s " New Era. 1 30 

Benj. Moore Co.s "Ark Bd .... } £> 

British Navy deck .... 150 

Brandram-Hendersou's "English 1 45 

Kamsay's paints, Pure, per gal J «« 

" Thistle, " .... } 10 

Martin-Senour's 100 p.c. pure 1 55 

Senour's Floor Paints. ••■••••■■;, J S. 

Jamieson's "Crown and Anchor J m 

Jamieson's floor enamel 150 

" Island City " paint J « 

Sanderson Pearcy's, pure 1 ^ 

Robertson's pure paints >■*" 

POTTY. 

Bulk In bbls J j£ 

Bladders in bbls ' ™ 

25-lb tins 

Bladders in hulk or tins less than 100 lb 2 00 

Bulk in 100-lb. irons 1 8J 

SHINGLE STAINS. 

In 5 gallon lots ... 1-8") 9) 

SHELLAC. 

White, bleached 2 65 

Fine orange « ?u 

Medium orange '55 

turpentine AND OIL. 

Prune white petroleum 13 

Water white " 144 

Pratt's a- tral " ■ •• 18 

Castoroil 08 10 

Gasoline •••; ° Mi 

Benzine, per gal 17 ^0 

Turpentine, single barrels 78 0(9 

Linseed Oil, " raw 61 0M 

" boiled 61 67 

WHITE LEAD GROUND IN OIL. Per 100 l v 8 

Canadian pure 7 15 7 50 

No. 1 Canadian 6 80 7 1a 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 65 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure 7 65 

Monarch 7 40 

Standard Decorator's 7 15 

Essex Genuine 6 80 

Brandrams B. B. Genuine 8 70 

" Anchor," pure 7 40 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 7 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 6 65 

"Crown and Anchor," pure 7 25 

Sanderson Pearcy s 7 40 

Robertson's O. P.. lead 7 20 

RED DRY LEAD. 

lieuuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 6 25 

'ienuine, 1001b. kegs, " .... 6 50 

N". 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 6 00 

No. 1, 1001b. kegB, per cwt 6 25 

WINDOW GLASS 

Size United Double 

inches. 8tar Diamond 

Under 26 »4 25 $6 25 

26 to 40 4 65 6 75 

41to50 5 10 7 50 

51 to 60 5 35 8 50 

61 to 70 5 75 9 75 

71 to 80 6 25 11 00 

81 to85 7 00 12 50 

36to90 15 00 

91 to95 17 50 



96 to 100 20 50 

101 to 105 24 00 

100 to 110 27 50 

Discount- 16-oz, 25 per cent.; 21-oz. 30 per 
sent, per 100 feet. Broken boxes 50 per cent. 

WHITING. 

Plain, in bbls 70 

Gilders bolted in bands 90 

WHITE DRY ZINO. 

Extra Red Seal, V.M 071 08 

WHITE ZINO IN OIL. 

Pure, in 25-lb. irons 084 

No. 1, " " 07 

No. 2, " " 051 

VARNISHES. 

Per gal. cans. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 

Pale durable body 3 50 

" hard rubbing 3 00 

Finest elastic gearing 3 00 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, polishing 2 00 

Furniture, extra 115 

" No. 1 .... 90 

" " union • .... 80 

Light oil finish 1 4C 

Gold si' e japan 180 

Brown japan 95 

No. 1 brown japan 95 

Baking black japan 1 35 

No. 1 black japan 90 

Benzine black japan 70 

Crystal Damar 2 80 

No. 1 " 2 50 

Pure asphaltum 1 40 

Oilcloth 1 50 

Lightning dryer 70 

ttlastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine floor varnish, per gal 2 50 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, 1 20 

Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, gal., 2 50 

Canada Paint Cos sun varnish 2 00 

" Kyanize" Interior Finish 2 40 

"Flint-Lac, "coach 180 

B H. Cos " Gold Medal," in cases 2 00 

Jamieson's Copaline, per gal 2 00 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE. 

BELLS. 

Brass hand bells, 60 per cent. 

Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Gongs, Sargeant a door bells. . 5 50 8 Ue 

American, house bells, uer lb. U 35 u 40 

Peterboro' door bells, 374 and 10 off new list. 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Felt, per 1O0 lb 2 25 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 1 00 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 25 

Carpet Felt per ton 60 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 40 00 

Dry Surprise 45 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. &I. X. L.... " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized " 400 " 45 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 600 " 100 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Root Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 80 o 90 

Slater's felt per roll 70 

Heavy Straw Sheathing f. o. b. St. 

John and Halifax 42 50 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 
Wrought Iron, 70 per cent. 
Cast iron Loose Pin, 60 per cent. 
Wrought Steel Fast Joint; and Loose Pin, 

70 per cent. 

CEMENT AND FIREBRICK. 

Canadian Portland 2 00 2 10 

Belgium 160 190 

White Bros. English 180 205 

" Lafarge " cement in wood 3 40 

"Lehigh" oement, in wood 2 54 



"Lehigh" cement, cotton sacks 2' 39 

" Lehigh cement, paper sacks 2 31 

Fire brick, Scotch, per 1,100 .... 27 00 30 00 

English 17 00 21 00 

" American, low 23 25 00 

high 27 50 35 00 

Fire clay (Scotch), net ton 4 95 

Paving Blocks per 1,000. 
Blue metallic, 9"x4»"x3", ex wharf . . 35 00 
Stable pavers, 12"x6"x2", ex wharf . . 50 00 
Stable pavers, 9"x4J"x3", ex wharf . . 36 00 

DOOR BETS. 

Peterboro, 374 and 10 per cent. 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey's Rod per doz 1 75 

Coil, 9 to 11 in " 95 1 65 

Knglish " 2 00 4 00 

Chicago and Reliance Coil 25 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Disoount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 
Peterboro, 374 and 10 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

Iron, discount 40 per cent. 
Brass, 45 per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, discount 50 per oent. 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb. net . 06 

5-in., " 0?j 

" " 6-in., " 051 

8-in., " OoJ 

" " 10-in. and larger . . 05 

Light T and strap, discount 65 d.c. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

under 12 in.... per 100 lb 4 65 

over 12 in " .... 3 65 

Crate hinges and back flaps, 65 and 5 p. c 
Hinge hasps, 65 per cent. 

SPRING HINGES. 

Spring, pergro.. No. 5. $17.50 No. 10, $18; 

No. 20, $10.80; No. 120, $20; No. 51, 

$10 : No. 50, $27.50 
ChicagoSpring Butts and Blanks 124 percent. 
Triple End Spring Butts. 3U and 10 per cent. 
Chicago Floor Hinges, 374 and 5 off. 
Garden City Fire House Hinges, 124 P c. 
"Chief " floor hinge, 50 p.o. 

CAST IRON HOOKS. 

Birdcage per dor. 50 110 

Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and ooat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 100 

Wrought hooks and staples— 

J x 5 per gross .... 2 65 

5-16x5 " .... 3 30 

Bright wire hooks, 6) p c. 

Bright steel gate hooks and staples, 40 p.c. 
Cresent hat and ooat wire, 60 per cent. 
Sorew, bright wire, 65 per cent. 

KNOBS. 

Door, japanned and N.P., doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. * L. 

screw per gross 1 30 2 00 

White door knobs per doz 2 00 

Peterboro knobs, 374 and 10 per cent. 
Porcelain, mineral and jet knobs, net list. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Canadian 40 to 40 and 10 per cen- . 

LOOKS. 
Peterboro. 37Vj and 10 per cent 
Russell * F.rwin. steel rim $2.50 ner do» 
Eagle cabinet locks, discount 30 per cent 
American padlocks, all steel, 10 to 15 per 
cent.; all brass or bronze, 10 to 25 per cut. 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

B. ft A. sand, discount, 35 per cent 

Emery, disoount 35 per oent. 

Garnet (Burton's) 5 to 10 per oent. advance 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid 1 50 • ' 5 

HASH CORD. 

Per lb 31 

BLIND AND BED 8TAPLB8. 

All sizes per lb 07! 10 



WROUGHT STAPLE8. 

Galvanized 2 75 

Plain 2 50 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

Bright spear point, 75 per cent, discount. 



TOOLS AND HANDLES. 

ADZES. 

Discount 224 per cent. 

AUGERS. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Single bit, per doz 6 00 9(0 

Double bit, " 10 00 1100 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes. 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 700 900 

Red Ridge, boys', handled 5 75 

hunters 5 25 

BITS. 
Irwin's auger, discount 474 Per cent, 
(iilmour s auger, discourt 60 per cent. 
Rockford auger, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen. auger, net list, 
(iilmour s car, 474 Per cent. 
Clark's expansive, 40 per cent. 

Clark's gimlet, per doz 65 

Diamond, 8hell, per doz 100 

Nail ind Spike, per gross 2 25 

BUTCHERS CLEAVERS 

German ner doz. 7 00 9 00 

American " 12 00 18 00 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

CHISELS. 

Wamook's, discount 70 and 5 percent. 
P. S. & W. Extra, discount, 70 per cent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

S. 4 D., No. 3 per pair 13 

9.1D., " 5 '' 114 

9.&D.. " 6 ■• 18 

Boynton pattern " 0M 

CROWEAR.-J. 

3 l /4c. to 4c. per lb. 

DRAW KNIYES. 

Coaoh ana Wagon, discount 75 and5pei oent. 
Carpenters' disoount 75 peroeDi. 

DRILLS. 
Millar's Falls, hand and breast, net list 
North Bros., each Bet, 50c. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 75 per cent . 

Arcade ;. 75 

Kearney t Foot 75 

Disstons 75 

American 75 

J. Barton Smith 75 

McCiellan 75 

Eagle 75 

Nichol son 665 

Globe 75 

Black Diamond. 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Jowitt's, English list, 274 per cent. 



GAUGES. 

Stanley* discount 50 to 60 per cent. 
Wiun's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 65 



2 40 



HANDLES. 
Second growth ash fork, hoe, rake and 

shovel handles, 40 p o. 
Extra ash fork, hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, 45 p.c. 
No. 1 and 2 ash fork, hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, 50 p.c. 
White ash whiffletrees and neckyokes, 35 p o. 
All other ash goods, 40 p.c. 
All hickory, maple and oak goods, excepting 

carriage and express whiffletrees, 40 p.c. 
Hickory, maple, oak carriage and express 

whiffletrees, 45 p.c. 

HAMMERS. 

Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per oent. 
Canadian, discount 25 to 274 per cent. 

Magnetic tack per doz. 1 10 1 20 

Canadian sledge per lb. 07 084 

Canadian ball pean, per lb. . . 2} 25 



63 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MistaKes and Neglected Opportunities 

MATERIALLY REDUCE THE PROFITS OF EVERY BUSINESS 

Mistakes are sometimes excusable but there is no reason why you 
should not handle Paterson's Wire Edged Ready Roofing, Building 
Papers and Roofing Felts. A consumer who has once used Paterson's 
"Red Star" "Anchor" and "O.K." Brands won't take any other kind 
without a lot of coaxing, and that means loss of time and popularity 
to you. 

THE PATERSON MFG. CO., Limited, Toronto and Montreal 



HATCHETS. 

Canadian, discount 40 to 42} per cent. 
Shingle, Red Ridge 1, perdoz 4 40 

Barrel Underhill. . ..' 5 05 

Mortar, 50 and 10 per cent 

MAXLET8. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz. 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

MATTOCKS. 
Canadian per doz. 5 50 6 00 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
German, 15 per cent. 
American discount, 334 per cent. 

PICKS. 
Per dozen 600 900 

PLANES. 

Wood bench, Canadian. 40, American, 25. 

Wood, fancy, 374 to 40 per cent. 

Stanley planes, 31.55 to $3 60, net list prices. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English per doz. 2 00 5 00 

Stanley, 2| inch, single 24c, double 39c. 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, 37} to 40 per cent. 

Button's imitation perdoz. 5 00 9 00 

Berg's wire fencing 1 72 5 50 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers perdoz. 100 185 

Conductor's " 3 00 15 00 

Tinners', Bolid perset 72 

" hollow per inch .... 100 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 37} per cent. 

RULES. 
Boxwood, discount 70 per cent. 
Ivory, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

8AW8. 
Atkins, hand and crosscut, 25 per cent. 
Disston's Hand, discount 12} per cent 

Disston's Crosscut per foot 35 55 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

frame only each 50 125 

S. 4 D. solid tooth circular shingle, con- 
care and band, 50 per cent ; mill and ice, 
drag,30per cent.; cross-cut,35 per cent.; hand 
saws, butcher, 35 per cent. ; buck, New 
Century. $6.25; buck. No. 1 Maple Leaf, 
$5.25; buck, Happy Medium, $4.25; buok, 
Watch Spring, $1.25; buck, common trame, 
$4.00. 

Spear & Jackson h Raws— Hand or rip, 28 in., 
$12.75; 23 in., sit. 25; panel, 18 in., $8 25; 
20 in .$9; tenon, 10 in , $9.90; 12 in., 110.90; 
UtaL.iU.50L 

SAW SETS. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

X -Cut Sets. " 7 50 

Maple Leaf and Premiums saw nets, 40 off. 
S. A D. saw swages, 40 off. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's perdoz. 65 100 

North Bros., No. 30 . .per doz 16 80 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SQUARES. 

Iron, discount 20 per cent. 

Steel, discount 65 and 10 per cent. 

Try and BeTel. discount 50 to 52} per cent. 



TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin perdoz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Ohesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel each 80 8 00 

Berg's, each 75 2 50 

TROWELS. 

Disston's, discount 10 per cent. 
H. 4 TV. discount 35 per cent. 

Berg's, brick, 924x11 4 00 

'• pointing, 924x5 2 10 

FARMANDGARDEN GOODS 



American cow bells, '635 per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
American, farm bells, each . . 1 35 3 00 

BULL RINGS. 

Copper, $2.00 for 2}-inch 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 8 50 

BARN DOOR HANGERS. 

doz. pairs. 

Steams wood track 4 50 6 00 

Zenith 9 00 

Atlas, steel covered 5 00 6 00 

Perfect 8 00 1100 

New Milo. flexible 6 50 

8teel, track, 1 x 3-16 in(100 ft) ... . 3 25 

" 1} x 3-16 indOO ft) .... 4 75 

Double strap hangers, doz. sets 6 40 

Standard jointed hangers, " 6 40 

Steel King hangers " 6 25 

StormKingandsafetyhangers .... 7 00 

" rail 4 25 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big Twin 
Hangers, 5 per cent. 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

50 and 10 per cent. 

S. 4 D. lawn rakes, Dunn's, 40 off. 

" sidewalk and stable scrapers, 40 off. 

HAT KNIVES. 

Net list. 

HEAD HALTERS. 

Jute Rope, S-incb per gross 9 00 

" ,r \ " .... ,? .... 10 00 

" " J " .... " .... 12 00 

Leather, 1-inch per doz 4 00 

Leather, 1} " " .... 5 20 

Web " .... 2 45 

HOES. 
Garden, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Planter per doz. 4 00 



4 50 

LAWN MOWERS 

Low wheel, 12, 14 and 16-inch $2 30 

9-inch wheel, 12-inch 2 85 

14 " 3 IC 

16 " 3 12} 

High wheel, 12 " 4 05 

,r " 14 " 4 50 

16 " 4 75 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz. net 6 25 9 25 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, discount 2u per cent. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1100 

stable nrriNaa. 

Warden King, 35 per cent 
Denois Wire 4 Iron Co., 33J p.c. 

WOOD HAY RAKES. 

40 and 10 per cent. 



HEAVY GOODS, NAILS, ETC. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 101 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 09} 

Brook s, 80-lb. and over 11} 

Taylor-Forbea, prospectors 05 

Columbia Hardware Co., per lb 09} 

VISES. 

Wrights 13« 

Berg «, per lb 12} 

Brook's 12J1 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 350 

" " " No. 2 5 50 



Saw Vise 4 50 5 00 

Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 per cent. 

" parallel (discount) 45 per ce-n I . 

BOLTS AND NUTS 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list Per cent. 

" " I andBmaller.. 60, 10 and 10 

" " 7-16 and up . . . . 55 and 5 

" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 50 

Machine Bolts, i and less 60 and 10 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 1U 

Blank Bolts 55 

Bolt Ends 55 

Sleigh Shoe BoltB, 3 and less . . 60 and 10 
" " 7-16 and larger 50 and 5 

Coach Sorews, conepoint 70 and 5 

Nuts, square, ad sizes, 4c. per cent, off 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4}c per cent. off. 
Stove Rods per lb., 5} to 6c. 
Stove Bolts, 75 per cent. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, per 100 lb.. Jin., $6 00; 5-16 in., 

$4.85; I in., $4.25; 7-16 in, $4.00; } in., $3 75; 

9-16 in. $3 70: J in., $365; i in., $3.60; I in., 

$3.45; 1 in,. $3.40. 

Haitt r, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. ; Cow ties, 40 per cent ; Tie out 
chains 65 per cent. ; Stall fixtures, 35 per 
cent. ; Trace chain, 45 per cent. ; Jack chain 
iron, 50 per cent. ; Jack chain, orass, 50 per 
cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 

M.R.M. cold forged process, list May 15, 1907, 

50 and 5 per cent. 
"U" brand, 57} per cent, off list. 
Capewell brand, quotations on application. 

HORSESHOES. 

M.R.M. brand: iron, light and medium 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; No. 2 and larger' 
$3.65 ; 8now pattern No. 1 and smaller. $4.15, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.90; "X.L." new .ight 
steel, No. 1 and smaller, $4 25 ; No 2 and 
larger, $4 ; "X.L" featherweight steel, No. 

to 4, $5.60; toe-weight, all sizes, .$6.85. 
F.o.b. Montreal. Extras for packing. 

Belleville brand : No. and 1, light and 
medium iron, $3.90; snow, 84.15; light steel, 
$4.25 ; No. 2 and larger, light and medium 
iron, $3.65; snow, $3.90; light steel, $4. 
F.o.b. Belleville. Two Der cent., 30 days. 

Toccalks —Standard No 1 and smaller, 
81. 50 ; No. 2 and larger, $1.25. Blunt No. 

1 and smaller, $1.75 ; No. 2 and larger, 
$1.50 per box. Sharp. Put up in 25 lb. bxs. 

hDRSE WEIGHTS. 

Taylor- Forbes, 4}c. per lb. 

NAILS. Cut. Wire'. 

2d 4 00 3 50 

3d 3 15 3 20 

4and5d 2 90 2 90 

6and7d 2 80 2 80 

8 and 9d 2 65 2 65 

10 and 12d 2 60 2 60 

16and20d 2 55 2 55 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 50 2 50 

F.o.b. Montreal. Cut nails, Toronto 20c. 
higher. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 per cent 
Coopers' nails, discount 40 per cent. 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Pressed spikes, fi diameter, per 100 lbs $3.15 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60, 10 and 10. 
Iron Burrs, discount 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
( Jopper Rivets, usual proportion burrs, 1 5 p 
Copper Burrs only, net list. » 

Extras on Coppered Rivets, }-lb. packages 

lc. per lb.; }-lb. packages 2e. lb. 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 4c. per lb. 

SCREWS. 
Wood, F. H., bright and steel, 65 and 10 p.c. 

" R. H., bright, 80 and 10 pei cent. 

" F. H., brass, 75 and 10 per cent. 

" R. H., " 70 and 10 per cent. 

" F. H., bronze, 70 and 10 per oeut. 

" R. H., " 65 and 10 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 87} per oent. 
Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per oent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per oent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 



MACHINE SCREWS. 
Flat head, iron and brass, 35 per cent. 
Felister head, iron, discount 30 per cent. 
" " brass, discount 25 per cent. 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 75 p.c. f tinned, 80 
and 10; (in kegs), 40; cut tacks, blued, in 
dozens only, 75; } weighs, 60; Swedes 
cut tacks, blued and tinned, bulk, 75 
dozens, 75 ; Swedes, upholsterers', bulk, 85 
and 12} ; brush, blued aud tinned, bulk, 70 ; 
Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and japauie <1. 
75 and 121 ; zinc tacks. 35 ; leather carpet ; 
tacKS, 40 ; copper tacks, 25 ; copper nails '.iO : 
trunk nails, black, 65; trunk nails, tinned and 
blued, 65 ; clout nails, blued and tinned 65 ; 
chair nails, 35; patent brads, 40: line finish- 
ing, 40; lining tacks, in papers, 10; lining 
tacks, in bulk, 15 ; lining tacks, solid heads, 
in hulk, 75 ; saddle nails, in papers, 10 ; 
addle nails, in bulk, 15 ; tufting button", 22 
line in dozens only, 60; zino glaziers' points, 
5; double pointed tacks, papers,' 90 and 10 ; 
double pointed tacks, bulk, 40; clinch and 
do ik rivets, 45 ; cheese box tvcks, 85 and 5 
trunk tacks, 80 and 10. 

WROUGHT IRON WAKHER8. 

Canadian make, discount 40 per cent. 



SPORTING GOODS. 

CARTKIIi'. ' 

" Dominion " Rim Fire Cartridges and 
C. B. caps, 50 and 7} per cent.; Rim Fire 
B.B. Round Caps, 60 and 2} per cent.; 
Centre Fire, Pi tol and Ritie Cartridges, 
30 p.c; Centre Fire Sporting and Military 
Cartridges, 20 and 5 p.c; Rim Fire, Shot 
Cartridges, 5" and 7% p.c; Centre Fire, Shot 
Cartridges, 30 p.c.; Primers, 25 p.c. 

LOADED SHELLS. 

"Crown" Black Powder, 15 anil 5 p.c; 
"Sovereign" Empire Bulk SmokeleBS Powder, 
30 and 5 p.c: "Regal" Ballistite Dense 
smokelefs Powder, 3S and 5 p.c; "Imperial" 
Empire or Ballistite Powder, 30 and 10 p.c. 

EMPTY SHELLS 

Paper Shells, 25 and 5; Brass Shells. 
55 and 5 p.c. 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

}-lb. bags $0 70 

Best thiok white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 29 
Best thick white card wads in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

1 tin, card wads, In boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1.0C0 

each, lOgauge 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 6C 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 115 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 ,r 1 65 

5 and 9 " 1 90 

SHOT. 

Ordinary drop shot. AAA to dust $7.50 per 
100 lbs. Discount 5 per cent ; cash dl'Ooanl 

2 per cant, 30 days ; net extras as follows 
subject to cash discount only ; Chilled, 40 c; 
buck and seal, 80c; no. 28 ball, $1 20 per 100 
lbs.; bags less than 25 lbs., }c. per lb.; K.O.B. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London. St. 
John and Halifax, and freight equalized 
thereon. 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, disoount30and 10 per oent. 
Game, Hawley 4 Norton, 50, 10 4 5 percent 
Game, Victor, 70 per cent. 
Game, Oneida Jump (B. & L. ) 40 4 2} p. 
Game, steel, 60 and 5 per oent. 

skates. 
Skates, discount 37Vj per cent. 
Empire hockey stioks, per dox . . 3 00 



64 



w« 



rrtar-ce 



HARDWARE AND ME TAT, 
lectric Fixtures, Sockets, arid C«J-t-0«j-ti 




Llectrical Supplies of all kinds. 



MONTREAL, 



No Waste Circulation Z."^ZZ£?JZZ L - '"' 



CUTLERY AND SILVER 
WARE. 

razors. per doz. 

EUiot'B 400 1800 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

" KingOutter 13 50 18 50 

.Vade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Lewis Bros.' " Klean Kutter' 8 50 10 50 

Henckel's 7 50 20 00 

Bergs 7 50 20 00 

C1BU88 Razors and Strops, 50 and 10 per cent 

KNIVES. 

Farriers-Stacey Bros., doz 3 50 

PLATED GOODS 

Hollowware, 40 per cent, discount. 
Flatware, staples, 40 and 10, fancy, 40 and 5. 
Hutton'a "Cross Arrow" flatware, 47%; 

"Singalese" and "Alaska" Nevada silver 

tlatware, 42 p.c. 

SHEARS. 

Clauss, nickel, discount 60 per cent. 
Olauss, Japan, discount 67 J percent. 
Clauss, tailorB, discount 40 per cent. 
Seymour's, dUcount 50 and 10 per oent. 
Be/g's 6 00 12 00 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS. 



5 75 



30 p.c. 



APPLE PARERS. 

Hudson, per doz., net 

BIRD CAGES. 

Brass and Japanned, 40 and 10 p. 0. 

COPPER AND NICKEL WARE. 

Copper boilers, kettles, teapots, etc 
Copper pitts, 20 per cent. 

Kill HI N ENAMELEC WARE. 

White ware 75 per cent. 
London and Princess, 50 per cent. 
Canada. Diamond, Premier, 50 am' 10 p.c. 
Pearl, Imperial, Creaoent and granite steel, 

50 and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
Star decorated Bteel and white, 25 per cent. 
Japanned ware, discount 45 per cent. 
Hollow wire, tinned cast, 35 per cent. off. 

KITCHEN SUNDRIES. 

Cm openers, per doz 40 75 

Mincing knives perdoz 50 80 

Duplex mouse traps, perdoz 65 

Potato maehers, wire, per doz. . . 60 70 

wood " . . oO 60 

Vegetable slicers, per doz '25 

Universal meat chopper \\o. 1 1 15 

Enterprise chopper, each 1 30 

Spiders and fry pans, 50 per cent. 

Star Al chopper 5 to 32 1 35 4 10 

100 to 103 1 35 2 00 

Kit.hen hooks, bright 60 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 

Galvanized 1 87 

King, wood 2 75 

King, glass " 4 00 

All glass " 50 

MKTAI. POLISH, 

Tandem metal polish paste 6 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head 40 100 

Tin and gilt, picture wire, 75 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 90 

" No 50. nickle-plated. " n 95 

" handles, japaned, per gross 9 25 

nickled, " 9 75 

Common, plain 4 25 

plated * 50 

Bhestos, per set 1 5J 

TINWARE. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

2-in. plain or corrugated., per 100 feef, 
♦3.30; 3 in, $4 40; 4 in, $5.80; 5 in., $7.45; 
6 in., $9.9.1. 

FAUCETS. 
Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUGHS. 

10-inob per 100 ft. 3 30 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 

Discount off revised list, 35 per cent 
Milk oan trimmings, discount 25 per cent. 
Creamery Cane, 45 per cent 



5 60 

3 85 
2 90 

4 50 
90 



LANTERNS. 

No. 2or4 Plain Cold Blast.... per doz. 6 50 
Lift Tubular and Hinge Flain, " 4 75 

No. C, safety " 4 00 

Better quality at higher prices. 
Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 
Prism globes, perdoz., $1.20. 

OILERS. 

Kemp's Tornado and McClary e Model 
galvanized oil can, with pump, 5 gal- 
lon, per dozen , 10 92 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent. 

Zinc and tin, discount 50 per cent. 

Coppered oilers, 20 per cent. off. 

Brass oilers, 50 per cent, off. 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

PAILS (GALVANIZED). 

Dufferin pattern pails, 45 ,.er cent. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs 40 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 35 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flarh.g sap buckets, discount 35 per cent. 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 35 per cent. 
Copoer bottom tea kettles and boilers, 30 p.c. 
Coal hods, 40 per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, 75 and 121 per cent,, off revised list. 
RetiLoed, 72.J per oent. revised list. 

SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 

Eureka tinned steel, hooks 8 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 7 64 7 91 

7 inch " " .... 8 18 

Nestable, discount 40 per cent. 

STOVEPIPE ELBOWS 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 32 

7-inch " 1 48 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 per oent. 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Perdoz 3 00 15 

Clauss, discount 35 per oent. 

TINNERS' TRIMMINGS. 

Discount, 45 per cent. 



HAY WIRE IN COILS. 

; No. 15, $2.95 ; 



2 95 

3 30 



WIRE. 

ANNEALED CUT HAY BAILING WIRE. 

No. 12 and 13, $4; No. 134, $4.10; 
No. 14, $1.2"'; No. 15. $4.50; in lengths 6' to 
11', 25 percent.; other lengths 20c. per 10J 
lbs extra ; if eye or loop on end add 25c. per 
100 lbs. to the above. 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS 

Discount nO per oent. 

CLOTHES LINE WIRE. 

7 wire solid line, No. 17. $4.90; No. 
18, $3.00; No. 19, $2.70; B wire solid line, 
No. 17. $4.45; No. 18, $3.10; No. 19. $2 80. 
All prices per 1000 ft measure ; 6 strand, No. 
18, $2 60; No. 19, *2 90. F.o.b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal. 

COILED SPRIJ" 1 wtrv 

High Carbon, No. 9, $2 95; No. 11, $3.50; 
No. 12, $3.28. 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE. 

Discount 37 i per cent. 

FINE STEEL WIRE. 

Discount 25 per oent List of extaas 
In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, $5 — No. 18. 
$5.50 — No. 19, $6 — No. 20, $6.65 - No. 21 
$71 — No. 22, $7.30 — No 23, $7,65 — No- 
24, $8 — No. 25, $9— No. 26, $9.50— No. 27, 
$10— No. 28, $11— No. 29, $12— No. 30, $13- 
No. 31, $14— No. 32, $15— No. 33, $16— No. 34, 
$17. Extras net— tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2— Nos. 26-31, $4 t -Nob. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
75c.— oiling, 10c.— in 25-lb. bundles, 15c— iu5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c.— in 1-lb. hanks, 25o. 
—in J-lb. hanks, 38c— in J-lb. hanks, 50c— 
packed in casks or oases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 

FKNOE STAPLES. 
Bright 2 S3 ^ Galvanized ... 32 



No 13, $2.70 ; No. 14, 
f.o.b., Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE. 
Per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5, $3.9C - 
Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.35 — No 9, $2.85 — 
No. 10. $3.40 — No. 11, $3.45 -No. 12, $3 00 
—No. 13, »3.10-No. 14. $3.'.lj— No 15, $4.30 
—No. 16. $4.30 from stock. Base sizes, Nob. 
6 to 9, $2.35 f.o.b. Cleveland. Extras for 
cutting. 

LIGHT STRAIGHTENED WIRE. 

Over 20 in. 

Gauge No. per 100 lbs. 10 to 20 in. 5 to 10 in. 

to 5 $0.50 $0.75 $1.25 
6 to 9 fl.75 1.25 2 00 

10 to 11 1.00 1.75 2.50 

12 to 14 1.50 2.25 3.50 

15 to 16 2.00 3.00 4.50 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. 

No. 0-9 gauge, $2.40; No. 10 gauge, 6c- 
extra ; No. 11 gauge, 12c extra ; No. 12 
gauge, 20c. extra ; No. 13 gauge, 30c. extra ; 
No 14 gauge. 40c. extra ; No. 15 gauge, 55c. 
extra ; No. 16 gauge, 70c. extra. Add 60c. 
for coppering and $2 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb. —OUed wire 10c, 
spring wire $1.25, bright soft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in casks 
or cases 15c, bagging and papering 10c . 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb 
hanks, 50c, in J-lb. hanks 75c, in i-lb. 
hanks $1. 

POULTRY NETTING. 

2-in. mesh, 19 w. g., 50 and 5 p.c off. Other 

sizes, 50 and 5 p.c oft". 

WIRE OLOTH. 
Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rollfl. $1.72%, per 
100 sq. ft; in 50-ft. roUs, $1.77%, per 100 sq ft. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 

Galvanized, plain twist 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.70 for 
small lota and $2.60 for oarlots 

WIRE ROI'F. 

Galvanized 1st grade. 6 strands, 24 wires, |, 

S3; 1 inch S16.80. 
Black, 1st grade, 6 strands, 19 wires. |, $6; 

1 inoh &15.10. Per 100 feet fo.b. Toronto. 

WOODENWJRE. 

CHURNS. 

No. 0, $9 ; No. 1, $9 ; No. 2, $10 ; No. 3, 
$11 ; No. 4, $13 ; No, 5, $16.; f.o.b. Toronto 
Hamilton; London and St. Marys, 30 and 30 
per cent.; fob. Ottawa, Kingston and 
Montreal, 40 and 15 per cent, discount, 

CLOTHES REELS. 

Davis Clothes Reels, dls. 40 per cent. 

FIBRE WARE. 

Star pails, perdoz $ 3 00 

Tubs, " 14 00 

1 •• " 12 00 

2 '• " 10 CO 

3 " " 850 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 

3 to 6 feet, 12c. per foot ; 7 to 10 ft., 13c. 
Waggoner Extension Laddere,dis.40 per cent. 

MOPS AND IRONING BOARDS. 

" Best " mops 125 

"900"mopa 125 

Folding ironing loards 12 03 16 50 

REFRIGERATORS 

Discount, 40 per cent. 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 7 25 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, grained 
only, 4-in., style perdoz. 7 55 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, light stair 
pel doz 9 55 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-aotlng per doz 60 00 

Square " ' £3 00 

Eclipse, per doz 54 00 

DowBwell " 39 00 

New Century, per dot 75 00 



Daisv 54 no 

•Sic-phenson .'....'. 74 00 

WRINGERS. 

Royal Canadian, 11 in., perdoz. ... 35 00 

Royal Imericarl] in 35 00 

Eze- 10 in., perdoz 36 75 



MISCELLANEOUS 

AXLE GREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 600 700 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 

BELTING. 

Extra, 60 per cent. 

Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 p.c 

Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cm: 

Lace leather, per side, 75c.*, cut laces, 80c 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M 2 25 

Small heel ' t 50 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American perdoz. 100 150 

Bullard'a " .... 6 50 

CASTORS. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cent. 
Plate, discount 524 to 574 per cent. 

PINE TAR. 

J pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

"• " " ... 9 60 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse perdoz. 55 100 

Axlo " 22 33 

Screw " 22 1 00 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 140 2 00 

Canadian pitcher spout ... 1 80 316 
Berg'swing pump, 75 per cent. 

ROPE AND TWINE. 

Sisal 0}°t 

Pure Manilla 15 

"British" Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 23 

•• 5-32inoh 25 27 

4 inch 25 28 

Russia Deep 8e« 16 

Jute J9 

Lath Yarn, single 10 

double 10' 

Sisal bed cord 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60feet " 8) 

•• 72 feet " ''5 

Twine. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 25 

" " 4-ply i9 

Mattress twine per lb 33 45 

Staging " " 87 V. 

BINDER TWINE. 

500 feet, sisal 09 J 

500 " standard 09| 

550 :: :; »»?.■»• « •$ 

W , •■ 133 

Car lots, Jo. less; .iton lots, Jc less. 
Central delivery. 

SCALES. 
Gurney Standard, 35; Champion, 45 p.c. 
Burrow, Stewart t Milne — Imperial 
Standard, 35 ; Weigh Beams, 35 ; Champion 
Scales, 45 , 

Fan-bank" Standard, 30; Dominion. 50 
Richelieu, 50. 

Warren new Standard, 35 ; Champion, 45 
Weigh Beams, 30. 

STONES— OIL AND SCYTHE. 

Washita per b. 25 

Hindoatan 06 10 

" slip " 18 20 

■• Axe P " .... 10 

DeerCreek •••• 10 

Deerlick • • ■ • ° •» 

Axe • • • • 0J5 

Lily white " •••• 42 

Arkansas — 'J" 

Water-of-Ayr ■■•• 10 

Scythe per gros* 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 40 to 200 lb.,peVton .... 20 00 22 00 

" under401b., ' « Of 

1 200 lb. aDd over » w 



65 



HVRDWARE AND METAL 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



AuierHan Exporter 60 

American Shearer Co 10 

American Sheet and Tinplate Co 1 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Oo 28 

Atkins, K. 0, A Co 12 

Atlas Mfg Oo ■-'< 

B 

Haglan Bay Tin 1'late Co 49 

Banwell Hone Wire Fence Co 24 

Harnett. G A H. Co outside back cover 

Baswdwood Agency 13 

Beny Beor 57 

Buker. H A Co 21 

Bowser. S. F., & Co , Limited 57 

Brmndram Henderson, Limited 56 

Brantford Rooflug Co 17 

Buffalo Mfg Co 

Burr Mfg Co -'2 

Business Systems 27 

c 

Canada Foundry Co 14 

Oanada lion Furnaoe Co 49 

Canada Metal Oo 2S 

Canada Paint Oo 58 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works 54 

Canadian Copper Co 49 

Canadian Fairbanks Co 26 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Oo 13 

Capewell Horse Nail Co 3i> 

Carriage Mountings Co i8 

Caverbill. Learmont A Co 7,31 

Chicago Spring Butt Co 

Clausa Shear Oo 63 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 52 

Consumers Ooidige Oo 1 

Covert Mfg. Oo 28 

D 

Davenport. Pickup A Co 28 

Davidson. Thos., Mfg. Oo 4 

Defiance Mfg Co 55 

Dennis Wire and Iron Co 15 

Dieckmann, Ferdinand 53 

Dods.P.D M 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co 23 

Dorken Bros 24 

Dowswell Mfg. Co 10 



bit specialty Oo inside back cover 



Kcrrosleel Company 19 

Forman, John 41 

Forsyth Mfg Oo 21 

Forwell Foundry Oo 28 

Koi.C. H U 

Frothingham A Workman 6 



Gait Art Metal Oo 13 

Gibb, Alexander 28 

Gilbertson. W., A Oo 64 

Greening, B. Wire Oo 22 

Oreenway. Wm. 24 

Guelph Stove Co 18 

i.umev Foundry Oo 19 

Gntta Percha A Rubber Mfg. Co 

outside back cover 



Hanover Portland Cement Co 12 

Harrington \ Richardson Am. Co 23 

Hams, .1. W., Uo 68 

1 1. in ,v. Cooley 17 

Heinlsoh, R..SonsOo 28 

HobbsMfg. Oo 20 

Hopkins .t Allan Arms Co 16 

Howland. H. s.. .Sons A Co 5 

Hutton, .las., & Co 28 

Button. Wm., A Sons, Ltd 27 

Hyde, F. A Oo 20 



Imperial Varnish and Color Co 54 



James &tteid 12 

Jamieson, R. O., A Oo 5S 

Jardine. A. B . A Oo 13 

Johnson's. Iver. Arms and Cycle. Works 49 

Jones Register Co 17 



Kanda&Co 14 

rveujpMfg. Oo 30 

Kerr Engine Co 21 



Lamplough, I- - W 4 

Leslie, A. C, A Co 49 

Lewis Bros., Limited 3 

Lewis, Rice, A Son inside front cover 

lAj.kerby A MoComb 12 

1 lOndon Foundry Co 9 

London Rolling Mills 12 

Lucas, John 59 

Luf kin Rule Oo inside back cover 

Ly snglit , John outside front cover 

Mo 

McArthur. Alex.. A Oo 62 

McOaskill, Dougall A Oo 2C 

McClary Mfg. Oo 19 

MoDougall, R.. Co 68 

McClashan-ClarkeOo.. Ltd 13 

M 

Macfarlane, Walter 61 

Majestic Polishes 28 

Maple City Mfg. Co 27 

Maxwell, David A Sons 10 

Martiu-Senour Co 61 

Metal Shingle and Siding Oo 29 

Metallio Roofing Oo 47 

Milieu, John A Son .... outside back cover 

Mitchell, H.W ... 28 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co 49 

Moore, Benjamin, s Co 61 

Morrison, James, Brass Mfg. do 21 

Morrow, John, Screw, Limited 28 

Munderloh A Oo 66 

N 

Newman, W., A Sons 12 

Nicholson File Oo 67 

North Bros. Mfg. Oo 1 

Nova Scotia 8t»el and Goal Oo 49 

Novelty Mfg. Co 16 



Oakey, John, A Sons 30 

Oneida Coinm' nity ... inside back cover 

Ontario Lantern A Lamp Co 2i 

Ontario Steel Ware Co 11 

Ontario Tack Co 49 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pnmn Co . . 12 

Oshawa Steam A Gas Fi'tints Co 2 > 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 14 



Page Wire Fence Oo 31 

Paterson Mfg. Co. . 64 

Pearson, Geo D. Al'o 13 

Pease Foundry Co 5;: 

Pelton, Godfrey S 55 

Penberthy Injector Oo IS 

Peterborough Lock Oo 10 

Pink, Thos 2 



Queen City Oil Co. 



VI 



Ramsay, A., A Son Co 57 

Robertson. James Co inside back cover 

Roper. J. H 14 

RossRitieCo 68 



Samuel, M. A L. t Benjamin, A Oo 2 

Sanderson, Pcarcy A Co 55 

Seyn-our, Henry T. , Shear Co 26 

Sharratt A Newth 54 

Sherwin-Williams Oo 51 

Shurly A Deitrich 8 

Shirreff Mfg. Co 15 

Simonds Canada Saw Co 20 

almonds Mfg. Co 20 

Stairs, Son A Morrow 67 

Standard Ideal Co. Ik 

Stanley Rule A Level Co 15 

Standa-d Paint Co 27 

Steel Trough A Machine Co 22 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works... 55 

Stephens. G. F. A Oo 44 

Sterne, (i. F.. it Co 20 

Still, J. H , Mfg 29 



Taylor-Forbes Co outside front cover 

Thompson. BASH. .Co. outside baok cover 
Toronto and Belleville Roll ng Mills. . . 24 
Turner Brass Works 31 

w 

Waggoner Ladder Oo 13 

Western Wire Nail Oo 10 

Wilkinson, Heywood A Clark 59 

Winnipeg Paiui and Glsaa Oo 4'. 

Wright. E. T, A Co 65 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Alabastiae. 

Alabastine Co , Limited, Paris, Out. 

Auditors. 

Davenport, Pickup A Co., Winnipeg. 

Automobile Accessories. 

Canada Cycle & Mo'or Co., Toronto 

Jun -tion. 
Carriage MountingsCo., Ltd.. Toronto. 

A wnings. 

TobiD Tent and Awning Co., Ottawa 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
Frothingham A Workman, Montreal 
Robertson. Jas. Co,, Montreal. 

Bar Urns. 

Buffalo Mfg C> , Buffalo, N V. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Buffalo Mfg. Oo.. Buffalo, N.Y. 
Carriage Mountings Co., Ltd . Toronto. 
Forsyth Efg. Co . Buffalo N Y 
Ontario Metal Novelty Co., Toronto 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. 

Toronto 
Sadler A Haworth Toronto. 

Bicycles and Accessories. 

Johnson s. Iver. Arms and Cycle Works 
Fitchburg, Mass 

Binder Twine. 

Consumers Cordage Co. , Montreal. 

Bolts 

Toro-to A Belleville Rolling Mills, 
Belleville. 

Box Strap. 

J. N. Wariuinton, Montreal. 

Br ass Goods. 

Frothingham A Workman, Montreal. 
Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville. Ont 
Lewis, Rice, A Son., Toronto. 
Morrison. Jas .Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
Mueller Mfg. Co , Decatur. 111. 
Penberthy Injector Co.. Windsor, Out. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph, Ont. 

Bronze Powders. 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works, Mon- 
treal. 

Brusbes.\ 

United Factories, Toronto. 

Cans. 

Acme Can Works, Montreal. 

Builders' Tools and Supplies. 

Covert Mfg. Co , West Troy, N.Y. 
Frothingham A Workman Co.,Montreal. 
Howland. H. 8. Sons A Co., Toronto. 



Hyde. F., A Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros. A Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, & Son, Toronto. 
Lockerby A McComb, Montreal. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Newman A Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stanley Rule 4 Level Co., New Britain. 
Stanley Works. New Britain, Conn. 
Stephens, Q, F., Winnipeg. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Carriage Accessories. 
Carriage Mountings Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Covert Mig. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 

Carriage Springs and Axles. 

Guelph Spring and Axle Co., Guelph. 

Carpet Beateas. 

Ontario Metal Novelty Co., Toronto. 

Cartridges. 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 

Cattle and Trace Chains. 

Oreening. B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Chafing Dishes. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Churns. 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 
Clippers — All Kinds 

American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.H 

Clothes Reels and Lines. 

Hamilton Cotton Co.. Hamilton. Out. 

Clutch Nails. 

J. N. Warminton, Montreal. 

Congo Roofing 

Ruchanan Foster Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cordage. 

Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Cork Screws. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Cow Ties 

Greening, B , Wire Co., Hamilton 

Cuspidors. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Cut Glass. 

Phillips, Geo., A Co., Montreal. 

Cutlery— Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., A Son Oo., Ottawa. 
Clauss Shear Co., Toronto 
Dorken Bros. A Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham A Workman, Montreal. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark. N.J. 
Howland, H. S. Sons A Co., Toronto. 
Hutton, Wm., A Sons, Ltd., London, 

Eng. 
Lamplough, F. W., A Co., Montreal 
Phillips, Geo., A Co., Montreal. 
Round, John, A Son, Montreal. 



Electric Fixtures. 

Canadian General Electric Co.. Toronto. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh A Co., Montreal. 

Electro Cabinets. 

Cameron A Campbell Torr nto. 

Euameled Ware 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Engines, Supplies, etc. 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

Eavetroughs 

Wheeler & Bain, Toronto 

Fencing— Wo ven Wire 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Owen 

Sound. 
Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Co., 

Hamilton. 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co.. O. A H., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Nicholson File Co., Port Hope 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington A Richardson Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Johnson's. Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 

Fitchburg. Mass. 

Fibbing Tackle. 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Akron, Ohio 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lamplough, F. W., & Co., Montreal. 
Shirreff Mfg. Co., Brockville, Ont. 

Furnaces. 

Pease Foundry Co , Toronto. 

Galvanizing. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Dominion Wire Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Wind Engine A Pump Co., 
Toronto. 

Glass Ornamental 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Cibsone, J. B., Montreal. 
Pelton, Godfrey 8. 
Sharratt A Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., A Son, London, Eng. 

Handles. 

Still, J. H., Mfg. Co. 

Harvest Tools. 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Tillson- 
burg, Ont. 

Hoekey Sticks 

Still, J. H. Mfg. Co., St. Thomas. 

Hoop Iron. 

Frothingham A Workman Montreal. 



Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
J. N. Warminton, Montreal. 

Horse Blankets. 

Heney, E. N., A Co., Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 
Capewell Horse Nail Co., Toronto 
Toronto & Belleville Rolling Mills 
Bellevi le. 

Hot Water Boilers and Radi 
a tors. 

Oluff, R. J.. A Co Toromo 
Pease Foundry Co. Toronto. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Injectors — A u toma tic. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Iron Pumps. 

Lamplough, F. W., A Co., Montreal. 
McDougall, It., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wright, E. T., A Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Birkett, Thos., A Son Co., Ottawa. 
Frothingham A Workman, Montreal. 
Maxwell, D., A Sons, St. Mary's, Ont. 
Taylor, Forbes Oo.. Guelph. 

Lawn Mower Grinders 

Root Bros. A Co., Plymouth, Ohio. 

Ledgers — Loose Leaf. 

Business Systems, Toronto. 
Copeland-Chatterson Oo , Toronto. 
t 'rail i, Rolla L., Co.. Ottawa. 
Universal Systems, Toronto. 

Lithographing. 

London Printing A Lithographing Co., 
London, Ont. 

Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Oo., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
National Hardware Co., Orillia, Ont. 

Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Pink, Thos., A Co., Pembroke Ont. 

Lye 

Gillett, E. W.. A Co., Toron 



66 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Manufacturers' Agents. 

Fax, 0. II., Vancouver. 
Mcintosh, tl F., 4 Co., Toronto. 

limti, A'Mlumlor, M r™l. 

Snu, Bathgate & Co., Winnipeg. 

Metals. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Out. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Eadie. II. 0., Montreal. 

Prothingham 4 Workman. Montreal. 

Uibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Renin Mfg Co., Toronto 

Lealie, A. C, 4 Co., Montreal. 

Lyaaght, John, Bristol, Kng. 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Robertson, Jas., Co., Montreal 
Roper, .1. II., Montreal. 
Samuel, Benjamin & Co., Toronto. 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 
Thompson. B. & S. H. 4 Co. Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co., Preston, 
Ont. 

Metal Polish. Emery Cloth, etc. 

Oakey, John, 4 Sons, London, Eng. 

Nails Wire 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

Oil Tanks 

Bowser. S. F., & Co.. Toronto. 

Ornamental Iron and Wire. 

Denn s Wire 4 Iron Co , London, Ont. 

Packing. 

Outta I'trcha & Rubber Co Toronto 

Paints. Oils, Varnishes, Glass. 

Blanchite Process Paint Co., Toronto. 
Brandram-Hcnderson, Montreal 
Canada Paint Co., Moulreal. 
Canadian Oil Co.. Toronto 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto. 
Dots. P. D , 4 Co., Montreal 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamiesou, R. 0.. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lucas John & Co., New York 
McArthur, Corneille 4 Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill. DougalliCo.. Montreal. 
Moore Benjamin, 4 Co. Toronto. 
Ottawa Paint Wor s, Ottawa 
i,uecn City Oil Co., Torouto. 
Ramsay 4 Son, Mon'real 
Sanderson earcy & Co.. Toronto 
sherwiu-Williamx Co.. Moutrtai. 
Standard Paint Co., Montreal 
Star-'^rd Paint and Varnish Work* 

Windsor, Ont. 
Stephens 4 Co , Winnipeg. 
Martin-Senour Co.. Montreal 
Winnipeg Paint 4 Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 



Plumbers' Tools and Supplies 

Cauadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Oluff, R. J, 4 Co., Toronto 
Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal. 
Glauber Brass Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Jardinc, A. B., 4 Co , Hespeler, Out. 
Jenkins Bros.. Boston. Mass. 
Kerr Engine Co , Walkerville, Ont, 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son. Toronto. 
Merrell Mfg. Co.. Toledo. Ohio 
Mi utreal Rolling Mills Montreal. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Torouto. 
Mueller, II . Mfg. Co., Decatur. Ill 
Osbawa Steam 4 (las Fitting Oo.,Oshaw 
Kohrrtson Jas., Co. Montreal. 
Robertson, .las, Co, Limited, Toronto 

- unrr\ ilia, Umltedi Toronto 

Stairs, Sou 4 Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., Port Hope, 
Standard Sanitary Co., Pittsburg. 
Stephens, G R, it Co.. Winnipeg, Man. 
Turner Brass Works, Ohi. ago. 
Viokery, Orlando, Toronto. 

Polishes. 

Majestic Polishes, Toronto 

Portland Cement. 

International Portland Cement Co. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 
Hyde, F., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Thompson B. 4 S. H. 4 Co., Montreal. 

Poultry Netting. 

Oreeniug, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Printing. 

London Printing 4 Lithographing Co., 
London, Ont. 

Razors. 

Olauss Shear Co.. Toronto. 

Refrigerators. 

Fabien, C. P., Montreal. 

Registers 

Pease Foundry Co., Torouto. 

Rooting Supplies. 

Brantford Rooting Co., Brantford. 
Barrett Mfg. Co., New York. 
F. W. Bird, East Walpole, Mass. 
Buchanan Foster Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
McArthur, Alex.. <ft Co.. Montreal 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co., Preston, Out. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
H»tfnon Mfg. Co., Toronto 4 Montreal. 
Wheeler and Bain. Toronto 

Saws. 

Atkins, E.G., 4 Co., Indianapolis, Ind 
Shurly 4 Dietrich, Gait, Ont. 
Spear 4 Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 

Scales. 

Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal. 

Screw Cabinets, 

Cameron 4 Campbell, lor onto. 



Screws, Nuts, Holts. 
Dominion Win Mtn Oo . Montreal 

U unreal Rolling Mil in Oo . Montreal. 

Soil Pipe 

•IcF.irlane, V. alter, QlatgOW 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamiltor 
Hyde, F., 4 Co.. Montreal. 

Shelf lit, xes. 

Cameron & Campbell, Toronto. 

Slicurs, Scissors. 

Clauss Shear Co., Toronto 

Shovels and Spades 

Ellipse Mfg < !o , Ottawa 
Frothingham 4 Workman. Montreal. 
Peterboro Shovel 4 Tool Co., Pi 

Silverware, 

Hutto-, Wui , & Sons, Ltd., London, 

Bng 
\1 llashan, Clarke Oo., Niagara Fal a, 

Ont 
Phillips, Geo., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Round, John, 4 Son, Sheffield, Eng. 

Skates. 

Canada Cycle 4 Motor Co., Toronto. 
McFarlane, Walter, Glasgow. 

Sprayers 

Cavers Bros. , Gait 

Spring Hinges, etc. 

Chicago Spriog Butt Co., Chicago, 111. 

Stable Fittings 

Dennis Wire 4 Iron Co., London 

Steel Rails. 

Nova Scotia Steel 4 Coal Co., Mew Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stove Pipe. 

Chown, Edwin and Son, Kingston 

Stoves, Tinware, Furnaces 

Cauadian Heating 4 Ventilating Co. 

Owen Sound. 
t'opp, W. J., Son 4 Co., Fort William 
Davidson, Thou., Mfg. Co., Montreal 
Down Draft Furnaoe Co., Gait 
Guelph Stove Co., Guelph. 
Gurney Fouudry Co., Toronto. 
Harris, J. W.,Co., Montreal. 
Howard. Wm., Toronto 
Kemp Mufg. Co. Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co. London. 
Meirick Anderson, Winnipeg 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Smart. James, Mfg. Co., Brockville 
Stewart, Jas., Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Out. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph. Ont. 
Wright, E. T.,4 Co.. Hamilton. 



Tacit. 

Mootreul Rolling Mills Co, Montreal. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton. 

Tenia. 

Fobln Tent and Awning Co.. Ottawa 

Tin Plate. 

American Sheet 4 Tin Plate Co , Pitta 

burg. Pa 
lliiglan Buy I'ii, Plate Co., Briton Ferry 

South Wales 
l.y Igbt, John, Bristol, Newport and 

M in it real 

Turpentine 

Defiance Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Ventilators. 

Harris, J. W, Co., Montreal. 
Pearson, Geo. D., Montreal. 

Wall Paper 

Staunton Limited, Toronto. 

Wall Paper Cleaner. 

Gilbert, Frank 17. 8., Cleveland 

Washing Machines, etc 

Dowawell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
The Shultz Bros. Co., Brantford. 
Taylor Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Water Filters. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Wheelbarrows 

London Foundry Co., London Ont. 
SchulUBros. Co., Ltd., The Brantford. 

Wholesale Hardware 

Birkett, Thou., 4 Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Caverhill, Learinont 4 Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal. 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London. 
Howland, H. S.. Bona 4 Co., Toronto. 
Lamplough, F. W., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Broe. 4 Co., M ont real. 
Lewia, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 

Window and Sidewalk Prism-- 

Hobbe Mfg. Oo., London, Ont. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc 

Banwell-Hoxie Fence Co., Hamilton 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Oou 
Dominion Wire Mnfe. Co., Montreal 
Greening, B.. Wire Co.. Hamilton. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Jwen 

Sound 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Western Wire 4 Nail Oo , Loudon, Out. 

Wrapping Papers. 
Canada Pao«" Oo.. Toranto. 
McArthur, Alez., 4 Co , Montreal. 
Stairs. Son 4 Morrow. Halifax. N.S. 

Wringers 

Connor, J. H.&Son. O awa, Ont 



Wrought Iron Pipe and Cast Iro n Fittings 

Our Stock in these lines is complete. 
Can fill all orders promptly. Be sup- 
plied before the Spring rush commences. 



WM. STAIRS, SON & MORROW, Limited, HALIFAX, N.S 



WELL KNOWN BRANDS MADE IN CANADA BY 

AMERICAN j ^^^^T v^^V. X / / GLOBE 

/m /- // // i \ isC EAGLE 



KEARNEY and 
FOOT 

McCLEUAN 




GREAT 
WESTERN 

J. B. SMITH 



Dominion Works, Port Mope, On*. 



H A R DVV A R E WD M KT A I. 



" Seeing is Believing 



n 



C| As the Ross Sporting Rifle represents the best in modern 
rifle manufacture, the highest grade materials and minute 
accuracy in workmanship, it is to your interest to learn fully 
about this Canadian Rifle — 

€J The Ross Straight Pull 3o3 Sporting Model M is one of 
our leaders to retail at $26. The barrel is the celebrated 
Ross high pressure, non-fouling, gun-barrel steel — The 
breech action is dependable. 

Our representatives are now demonstrating the merits 
of this rifle — It places you under no obligation to drop 
us a line to make sure you will be on their calling list. 



Our advertising policy is co-operative. 



THE ROSS RIFLE CO., 



Q UEBEC 



A Good Pump 

is just as much part of a 
Hardwareman's line as 
any other House-furnish- 
ing. We have all styles, 
and a Catalogue which 
explains will be sent on 
application. 

McDOUGALL PUMPS 

ARE 

STANDARD PUMPS 

and we want to prove to 
you that such is the case. 

If you have pump 
trouble, write us. 

The R. McDougall Co., Limited 

GALT, - CANADA 




Chances for Business 



In these days of prosperity large 
public buildings are constantly being 
planned in all parts of the country. 

These are your chances for getting 
business. 

Good air is a necessity in all build- 
ings, but more especially in those built 
for public use. 

The best way to get good air is by 
the use of our 

AEOLIAN VENTILATORS 

They have been tried all over 
Canada, and have never failed to give 
complete satisfaction. 

Montreal, June 1 5th, 1903 
Messrs. J. W. Harris Co., Limited, Montreal. 
Dear Sirs, 
In answer to your request, we take very much 
pleasure in saying that we have your system of ven- 
tilation installed in our Church for several years 
and it has given us entire satisfaction. 

Fre. MARIE RAYMOND, O.F.M. 

Write us for terms. 

THE J. W. HARRIS COMPANY, LIMITED 

Contractors Montreal 




THE AEOLIAN VENTILATOR 

(Can be lupplied in cop- 
per, if ao desired.) 



68 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ROBERTSON'S 
SOLDERS 

Bar-King, Strictly Merchant's, 
Wire (any gauge) Tri- 
angular, Oval, Plumbers' 
and Canners' Solders, 
Electricians' Solder 

ARE STANDARD 



Ask Quotations 



The 



James Robertson Co., Limited 

144 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 



NIAGARA CHAIN 



FOR 



PIPE HANGING 



Most convenient and neatest as 
well as the most economical banger 
on the market. 

Pipe may be hung ;m\ distance 
from ceiling with this hanger. 

Permits of easy and exact ad- 
justment. 



Write for Samples and Prioes 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited 

NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 




CJra: 



TTTTT 




f UFK/N MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass SUi, 

Pat, Leather, Bend Leather, Etc 

ARE THE BE8T AND MOST POPULAR TAPE8 IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK 18 NOT OOMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 



Canadian Factory 

London Office and Warehouse— 24 aid 26 Holborn. 



Windsor, Ontario 

New York City Branch aw 



For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Kit. 1S68 




ISO. 1898. 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ^t^^&it Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



Copy of cata- 
logue sent free 
to any inter- 
ested file user 
upon applica- 
tion. 




Pid Iron 



Jarrow Brand 

Clarence 

Lackenby 

Cleveland 

Gartsherrie 

Carnbroe 

Glengarnock 

ETC. 



If you are in the market, send us particulars 
of your requirements, and we shall be glad to 
quote you favourable prices. 

B. &S.H. THOMPSON & CO. 



LIMITED 



381 and 383 St. Paul Street 
MONTREAL 



.. 



Redstone 



M 



High Pressure 

Sheet Packing 

A packing that will hold. For use in highest 
pressures for steam, hot or cold water and air. 
Packs equally well for all. 

From actual tests, we believe that this pack- 
ing is the most durable and satisfactory of any on 
the market. Try a sample lot and see for yourself. 

Manufactured Solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

of TORONTO, LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES, 

47 Yonge Street, Toronto. 

Branches : Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



We are Headquarters 



FOR 



Automobile and Gas Engine Supplies 

(CATALOGUE B.) 

and Motor Boat Fittings 



(CATALOGUE C.) 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUES. 



We have just issued our Mid-summer Bargain 
Sheet — every man in the trade should have a copy. 



JOHN MILLEN & SON 



Limited 



321 St. James St. 
MONTREAL 



132 Bay Street 
TORONTO 



CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Also in Great Britain, United States, West Indies, South Africa and Australia. 

HARDWARE»°METAL 

A Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 

Office of Publication, 10 Front Street East, Toronto. 



VOL. XIX. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, AUGUST 24, I907 



NO 34. 



"Redcliffe" and "Globe" 

The best sheets for corru- 
gating. Uniform in weight. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO. Ltd , MONTREAL 
Bristol, Newport and Montreal Managers, Canadian Branch. 




ARROW*BRAND 

REGISTERED TRAOE MARK 



%. 



HARDWARE 



.«/■ 



*>y SPECIALITIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 



C 



For Sals b» Leading Wholesale Housis It'' 





It is generally admitted that the 

" Sovereign " Heating 
System 

familiarly known as Simplified Heating, is by far the 
most economical on the market. 

" SOVEREIGN " 
RADIATORS 

go far towards explaining this fact. They have a 
larger heating surface per loop, while the larger 
connection to all admits a free and easy circulation. 

" Sovereign " Radiators are artistic in design and 
we can supply them to harmonize with any scheme 
of house decoration. 

TAYLOR-FORBES COMPANY, Limited 

Head Office and Works : CUELPH, ONT. 

TORONTO 1088 King Street West. MONTREAL 122 Craig Street West. 

WINNIPEG The Vulcan Iron Works, Limited. 



I 



Read "Want Ads." on Page 51 



J 



MAR DWA R E A N 1) M ETA I. 




GEH FOOD 
CHOPPER 



A modern household utensil that is needed 
in every kitchen. Carefully made, nicely 
tinned, self-cleaning, self-sharpening. It has 
steel cutters, and is made in four sizes. 




No. 16 capacity I lb. per minute 
No. 20 " 2 lbs. 
No. 22 " 2% lbs. 
No. 24 " 3 lbs. 



(C 



(( 



U 



Gem Food Choppers chop all 
kinds of Raw or Cooked Meat, 
Fish, Clams, Oysters, Vege- 
tables of all kinds, Fruit, Bread, 
Crackers or Cheese, and many 
other articles used in making 
substantial dishes and dainty 
desserts. It is more useful than 
a chopping bowl and a great 
deal handier. It may be easily 
clamped to the kitchen table 
and is ready for use whenever 
needed. 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LirilTED 



TORONTO. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you have to do a 

CREDIT BUSINESS 



why not make it as 
easy and convenient 
as possible ? 

THE 

CRAIN 

MONTHLY 

ACCOUNT 

SYSTEM 

is designed especi- 
ally for the retail 
trade. It will cut 
your bookkeeping in 
half; accounts are 
always ready. 
We manufacture 
and devise sys- 
tems for any kind 
of business. 

Write us for Cata- 
logue "E," which 
will give you all in- 
formation 




THE ROLLA L CRAIN CO., Limited 

OTTAWA; CANADA 

Branches -TORONTO, 18 Toronto Street; MONTREAL, 28 Alliance Bldg., 
WINNIPEG, 11 Nanton Block. 



ONEIDA GALVANIZED CHAIN 

FOR ARC AND INCANDESCENT LAMP SUSPENSION 



Uniform in 
Strength. 

Always 
Flexible. 

l-' x Runs 

Smoothly 

over any! 

Standard 

Pulley. 

Write for 

circulars 

and prices. 




Heavily 
Galvanized 

Rust proof. 

The most 
durable and 
economical 
material on 
the market 
for the pur- 
pose. 



! 



Send fur free sample to hang one lamp, stating length required. 

Oneida Community, Ltd. 

Niagara Falls, Ont. 




Freezes two flavors of Ice Cream or an Ice 
or Sherbet and Ice Cream at one and lame 
time, in one freezer. 

SOMETHING ENTIRELY NEW 
—NEVER DONE BEFORE. 

THE can is divided in two parts 
by a vertical partition. One 
flavor is placed in one, the 
other in opposite side of can, in each of which the scrapers, etc., 
operate. The can cannot be turned as in old style freezers, be- 
cause of the partition. It is therefore swung to and fro by a rock- 
ing motion of the crank. This is a more comfortable and much 
easier movement. It is very much less tiresome than turning a crank. 
One can sit back in a chair with freezer alongside and rock the crank 
to and fro without discomfort or undue exertion and even read at same 
time. Although two flavors are frozen at once and with less exertion, no more 
time is required than in old style freezers. 

The Pails have electric welded wire hoops, which are guaranteed not to break or fall off; Cans are of 
heavy tinplate with drawn steel bottoms that are guaranteed not to fall out or break and do not leak, the 
strongest and most durable Freezer Can made; the Automatic Twin Scrapers by their positive action insure 
perfect scraping of frozen particles from side of can. All inside parts are heavily coated with pure block tin. 
and outside parts all thoroughly galvanized. 
SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 




ICE CREAM 

FREEZERS 

THAT SELL 





THEY ARE 

Well Advertised 
In Demand 
Easily Sold 
Satisfactory In Use 
Of Known Reputation 



THEY EXCEL IN 

Easy Running 
Quick Freezing 
Economy 
Convenience 
Practical Result* 



Send for Catalog. 



North Bros. Mfg. Co, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



HARDWARE AND M ETA L 



C 1 
CD • 

d 

(L 


^^^ - «*• — ' — ^^ 


I 
1 

| 

I 
I 



PlIYlr^C MADE IN CANADA 

Lumbering 
Tools 



Send for Catalogue 
and Price List 



THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 
Zealand, Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of Lumber Tools 

Pink's Patent Open Socket Peaveys. 
Pink's Patent Open Socket Cant Dogs. 
Pink's Patent Clasp Cant Dogs, all Handled 
with Split Rook Maple. 

These are light and durable tools. 

Sold throughout the Dominion 
by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants 

MANUFACTURED BT 

■skst THOMAS PINK 
Pembroke, Ont., Canada. 



Pig Iron 



"JARROW" and "CLENGARNOCK." 



Agents fOr Canada, 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Go 



TORONTO 



II A \< I) W A R E AND M ET A I. 



Covertite Roofing 

THE ORIGINAL HIGH GRADE OF RUBBER ROOFING 





Mr. Dealer I— Laying Cover tite Roofing in Midwinter. 

Did you ever stop to consider the responsibility you assume in recom- 
mending to a customer a certain kind of Roofing ? If the Roofing you 
recommend gives good service through a sufficient number of years 10 
prove its durability, you are assured of a large patronage as a result 
of the reputation of these roofs. However, if the Roofing does not 
give satisfaction, the leakage will be a source of loss and annoyance 
to those who use it, and you will be certain to suffer a loss of trade 
and the confidence and respect of your customers. 

The fact that a Roofing has kept the water out for a season or two is 
no assurance of its durability, as it requires at least 5 years' wear 
to prove that it is worthy of your recommendation. 

Owing to the fact that the various brands, good and bad, are so 
similar in appearance and the representation of some manufacturers to 
Secure trade so questionable, it is necessary for the dealer to be ex- 
tremely cautious. Do not be deceived by the shrewdly-prepared, worth- 
less guarantee that a number of firms are offering — your best guide is 
the integrity and reputation of the firm from whom you purchase. 

The large trade that we have developed on our various lines is to a 
great extent due to a truthful representation of the value of each 
article that we sell, and before adding Covertite Roofing to our list, 
we have satisfied ourselves fully as to its quality and durability. The 
fact that our firm name is on every roll of Covertite Roofing makes both 
dealer and user absolutely secure. 

We are confident that all dealers reading the above lines will be 
interested, and if you will send as your name and address, we will be 
glad to furnish you with samples, prices and further information. 

Yours truly, 

EXCLUSIVE CANADIAN DISTRIBUTORS 



L_E\A/IS BROTHERS 



I Ml 



SHELF AND HEAVY HARDWARE 

OFFICE AND WAREROOMS: 14 TO 28 BLEURY STREET, MONTREAL 

• ■id »t TORONTO, OTTAWA, VANCOUVER, CALGARY, WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS SUCCESS 

Mr. Dealer, if you could take out a policy assuring commercial success 
in your line you certainly would do so. The next best thing is to place 
your orders for 

Carpenters' Tools - Builders Hardware 

with a specialty house — a house which guarantees quality and prompt 
deliveries. We handle 

Stanley's, Union Hardware Co. and Sarjent's Iron and Wood Bottom Planes. 

Disston's, Atkins', and Shurly & Dietrich— High Grade Hand, Rip and Panel Saws. 

Sarjent's Front, Store Door and Inside Locks. 

Stanley's Butt Hinges— all kinds, all finishes. 

Also headquarters for Wood Sash Pegs, sizes 7 /%, lli, 1%-in. in one-bushel bags. 

Remember our prices are right and we deliver like lightning 

THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., Ottawa, Canada 




Davidson's 
"Empire" Stove Pipe 

Improved Patent 

Neatly packed in crates of 25. 
Secures lowest possible freight rate. 

Deep Swage Prevents Telescoping. 
Coated to Prevent Rust. 

Sold as low as ordinary Stove Pipes. 



SIMPLE and EASY to put together. 
No Profane Language Necessary. 
The only tools required are a pair of hands. 
Pipes beingr cut out with dies ensure abso- 
lute fit and conformity. 




Wash Tubs— Galvanized 

With Wringer Attachment 



Miners' Camp Kettles 

Strong and substantially made in 
extra heavy tin. 

Nineteen sizes, from % quart to 29 quarts. 




Nob. 1 2 3 

Top measurement, inches .. . ZWt 2294 25 

Bottom " " .... 17% 18V4 20 

Height " " .... 9V4 '10y 3 1 1 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Ltd., Mo w^ 



Montreal ad 
peg 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



Only 
Wholesale 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 
L38-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO. 



LIMITED 



Wholesale 
Only 




Call and 
see us 
when in 
Toronto 



Section of Sample Room— looking East. 



i 






Our 

Warehouse 

is opposite 

the 

Union Station 




Section of Sample Room— looking West. 



Our Price* are Right 



H, S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 

Opposite Union Station 

GRAHAM WIRE NAILS ARE THE BEST 

Are you receiving our monthly illustrated circular? IF NOT, WRITE FOR IT. 



LIMITED 



We Ship Prompt 



II A R D W A R E A X D METAL 



r 



GARNET PAPER 

Should be tough, pliable and not liable to crack. 

H. Barton's Best American have these 
qualities. It is used by the largest manu- 
facturing concerns and car shops in Canada 
in preference to any other. You should 
carry it in stock. 

Cuts faster than sand paper. 




In Sheets, 9x11 inches. 

IN ROLLS 

24, 30, 36, 40, 42, 46 1 

INCHES. 




Garnet 
Cloth 

In Rolls, 14-inch. 




SAND PAPER 



Star, in sheets, 81 x 10^-inch. 

Baeder & Adamson, in sheets, l .) x 11 -inch 

Baeder & Adamson, in Rolls, 

24, 30, 36, 40, 42, 48-in. 

EMERY CLOTH 

Atlas, Improved, in sheets, 8^ x lH-in. 
Baeder & Adamson, in sheets, x 11-in. 



I 

! 




i 



i 



WE HAVE A COMPLETE STOCK OF THE ABOVE. 

ASK OUR TRAVELLERS TO QUOTE, OR WRITE US. 



F.fcW. 



Hardware 
Montreal 






FROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN, Limited 

wmmmmmmma^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmtmmmmmam 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



YOU MAY HAMMER 

at many things besides Iver 
Johnson revolvers without their 
going off. 

And some of the things that 
won't go off- -your shelves — are 
inferior revolvers, generally imita- 
tions of Iver Johnson Automatic 
Safety Revolvers. 

Iver Johnson revolvers sell 
without effort. They have the 
call. They are the kind that are 
advertised. It requires no 
'hammering" to sell them, and 
no amount of hammering will 
discharge them. Accidental dis- 
charge is impossible. 

We have large stocks of these 
revolvers in all the different styles. 

They are shown in our Sport- 
ing Goods Blue Book for 1907. 

Have you received a copy ? 
If not, a post card request will 
bring you one. 






Showing the movement 

of the working 

parts 




Note that the hammer 

when down is not in 

contact with the 

firing pin 



The new grip gives a firm hold on the weapon 




The hammerless model 

made in 32 and 38 

S. & W. 



^miM^^mmor^^ 



MONTREAL 

Winnipeg Ottawa Quebec 



Fraservilie 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canada Leads the World in the Manufacture of 

HIGH-CLASS SAWS 



£SS9> 













No. 81 



The best and cheapest Hand Saw on the market, quality, temper and finish considered. 
Every saw warranted. Carved applewood handle. Patented, wave finish blade. 




No. 1 Maple Leaf Lance Tooth Cross-Cut Saw, and the No. Racer are tempered under 
our secret process. 










/Vo. O Narrow Racer Cross-Cut Saw 



If you want saws that will sell and give your customer satisfaction, you will stock 
the Maple Leaf Saws. 



Mxtnutaoturod 

by 



SHURLY & DIETRICH, 



CALT, Ontario 



II \ R DW A R E A N D M ETA L 



Simonds 
Crescent-Ground Cross-Gut Saws 





.UUOAO.vW 1 ™ 



For logging camps where work must be fast and economical there is no other saw made that can 
give results equal to the Crescent-Ground Saw. Made of Simonds 8teel. It cuts easy, runs fast 
and gives good results. This cross-cut saw is sold by most of the leading jobbers in Canada. 

Simonds Canada Saw Co., Limited 

TORONTO, ONT. MONTREAL, QUE. ST. JOHN. N.B. 



Mr. Hardware Dealer — 



We have a proposition : Why not carry a stock of 

PRATT AND WHITNEY SMALL TOOLS 

and add strength and dignity to your other lines ?'.... The quality and accuracy of these 
tools and the high standard set by the makers in their manufacture, is known the world over. 
Pratt and Whitney Small ToofS are made, and advertised extensively, in Canada. 
Discriminating buyers demand and use them. AVhy not get your share of this business? 
Attractive terms made to dealers "who will carry a stock. 

THE CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO., LTD. T o«o*to "™™f<T 

Exclusive Canadian Selling Agents 



VANCOUVER 




Wheelbarrows 



All kinds and sizes. The cut repro- 
duced here is just of one of the many, 
but the kind every contractor should 
use. The substantial, satisfactory, 
steel tray Contractor's Barrow. 

The London Foundry Co. 

LONDON, CAN. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




THREE PROFIT PULLERS ! 

MAXWELL LAWN MOWER 

The best for 

Durability, 

Finish 

and 

Efficiency. 




FAVORITE CHURN 

lies! for the 
customer 

and 

lu-st 

for you. i' u 




David Maxwell & Sons, St. Mary's, Ont. 



SIMPLE 




STYLE- F. 



^LEADER 

A Name Familiar to Batter Makers in Connection with the 

Highest Grade Churns 



ITS STRONG POINTS: 

Stiff Steel Frame, with malleable iron fittings, Combination Bow 
Lever and Pedal Drive. Bicycle Ball Bearings. Bolted Trun- 
nions. Cream Breakers. Barrel easily drained and conveniently 
detatchable for cleaning. 
Dealers : When you handle this line you handle QUALITY. 

The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., Limited 



W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal 

EASTERN AGENTS 



HAMILTON 

ONTARIO 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK Eg Sec y""" 10 W00PE ' 1 P,CK " °" Wl " 

FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO.. Limited, 



-LONDON, ONT 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 



Iwj>.-» °^s 




'KuetTHand, Electric Pewer 

. ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
gbeep-Shearing Machine*. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SXXD FOB 0ATALO6TO TO 

IiiiUh Shearer ■«*. Ce., luku, I.H. 

Weibusch & Hilger, limited special New Yo 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 




The Peterborough Lock Manufacturing Company, Limited 




Cylinder Night Latch, No. 103. 




Peterborough, Ont. 

Manufacturer* of all kinds 

Rim and Mortise Locks, 
Inside, Front Door, and 
Store Door Sets, also full 
line High-class Builders' 
Hardware. 

Sold by all Leading Jobber* 
In the Dominion. 



IO 



II A RDWARE AND ME T A L 

>♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦»»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+ ♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Consumers Cordage Co., 

Manufacture every variety of 

BINDER TWINE 



LIMITED 



CORDAGE 



PACKING 



LATHYARN 



SMALL TWINES 



From Manilla, Sisal, Italian, Russian, Jutb 

Tallow Laid Transmission Rope, 3 or 4 Strand 

Oil Well Drilling Cables, Lariat Rope, 3 or 4 Strand, 

Halyards, Deep Sea Line, Snap Halters, Snap Plow Lines, 

Clothes Lines, Hide Cord, Pulp and Paper Cord, 

Tarred Rope, Marline, Houseline 

Wrapping, Rolling, Seaming, Sewing and Grape Twines 

Careful Execution SPECIAL ORDERS Prompt Shipment 

Mills: nONTREAL, QUE., and HALIFAX, N.S. 



BRANCHES: 



F.H.ANDREWS & SON, Quebec. CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO., Limited, St. John, N.B. MacGOWAN & CO., Vancouver 

TEES & PERSSE, Limited, Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton. GEO. WOOD, London, England. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg, Binder Twine Distributors for Northwest. 



P 



FOR BEST 




QUALITY 



IN 



ENAMELLED and GALVANIZED 



WARE 

Buy goods 
manufactured by 

Ontario Steel Ware, Limited 




115-121 Brook Avo. and 79-91 Flon 

TORONTO. ONT. 



noe St. 



n 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



At kin's 

Si/ver Steel Saws 



Are just as good as they 
took to be 




Finest material, Finest workmanship 
Finest finish 

MAKE FRIENDS AND MONEY FOR THE DEALER 

£. C. A TKINS & CO., Inc. 

The Silver Steel Saw People, 

Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Canadian Branch — No. 77 Adelaide St., E., Toronto 



The Long and the Short of It 



IT" MEANS 




THE '•LONG" 

is the time it wears. It stands the test of heat 
and frost, wind and rain, and gives your cus- 
tomers manv years of solid satisfaction. 

THE "SHORT" 

part is the time needed to put it on. A great 
deal of time — which means a great deal of 
money — is saved to the man who uses 

SHIELD BRAND 
READY ROOFING 



LOCKERBY ®> McCOMB 

C>3 SHANNON STREET 

MONTREAL 



^ 



Working Iron 



in Common or 

Refined Bars 



London Bars are made in the following sizes: 

Fl»ta, - - « 7/16 inch to 4 inch x 3/16 inch to 1^ inch 
Round Edge Tire, 1 inch to 3 inch Rounds, 3/16 inch to 2% inch 
Squares, - tf " to 2% " Ovals, tf " to \% 
Half Ovals, . # " to 2y 3 " Half Rounds, # - to 2% 



M 



London Rolling Mills 

f London, Canada) 





When in the 
market for 
GANG CHEESE 
PRESSES and 
up - to - date 
CURD CUTTERS 
just sit 
down and 

write to JAMES & REID, Perth, Ont. For 
FARMER'S FEED COOKERS write JAMES BROS 
FOUNDRY CO., Perth, Ont. 



The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO 

—Manufacturers of the celebrated— 

"Saugeen Brand" 

OF PORTLAND CEMENT 

Prices on application. Prompt shipment 




NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINCS 

< 'milium! nil Hi'- qualities durable in a DoorClOBer. 
They worn ailenlly and effectually and never get 
out. of order. In use in many 01 the punlio buildings 
throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. 
MADE SOLELY BY 
W NEWMAN & 80N8. Birmingham. 



OUR "WANT ADS. 



get clerks for employers and 
find employers for clerks. 



12 



1 1 \ R I) W ARE A NO M ET A L 



"KANDA" R.rd. LIQUID METAL POLISH 

BRITISH MANUFACTURE. 

Absolutely non-inflammable. Has no bad smell. 

Leaves no Verdigris. Contains no acid or grit. 

Leaves no greasy smear. KANDA polishes all metal. 

"-'^'., LONDON. ENGLAND 

SOLE AGENTS for Ontario: 

THE KENNEDY HARDWARE CO., Ltd. 

TORONTO 





BEAVER POST-HOLE DIGGER 

will please your customer. A pleased customer is an 

asset to any business. No wood to rot, check or break. 

Special Discounts to Trade 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 



LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE and WORKS. TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices : Montreal, Halifax. Ottawa, 

Vancouver. Roseland 



Winnipeg 



SalfSu re gr i p Shi ngles 

are simply wonders to sell, to lay and to make friends. Once used 
and you would never use any other — your customers wouldn't let you. 

"Sure-Grips" make a really handsome roof, as well as the most 
weatherproof. Try them — that's all we ask. 

"Galt" Corrugated Sheets are best English galvanized stock, pressed 
straight and true. Our prices are right, and we can ship promptly. 

Consult us before purchasing Ceilings, Sidings, Roofings, Cornices, 
Skylights, Ventilators, Finials, Fire-proof Windows, Expanded 
Metal Lath, etc. 

The "Galt^Kind" is the line to push ; we protect 
and assist our customers. 

THE GALT ART METAL CO., Limited 

GALT, - ONT. 




Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

*tar Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

Per Sale kjr all WbeleaaU Dealari. 



Manufacturers' Agents 



H. W. MITCHELL 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Correspondence is solicited from manufacturers 
wishing a representative in Winnipeg. 

Travellers call regularly on the wholesale and 
retail trade in Western Canada. 

Highest references and financial responsibility. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 

Representing Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence invited from 
firms wishing to be represented. 



Jardine Hand Drills 

New Designs 

Get samples of these machines lor 
your show room. They will interest 
your customers and prove a good in- 
vestment. 

It pays to sell the best Tools. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 



HESPELER 



ONTARIO 



...FULL STOCK. 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

THE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 



HAMILTON. OUT. 



touobto, or* 



13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED 1795 



JOHN SHAW & SONS 

WOLVERHAMPTON, Limited 

WOLVERHAMPTON 

ENGLISH GALVANIZED 
POULTRY NETTING 

Advantageous Prices 
to Jobbers 

J. H. ROPER 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE 

82 St. Francois Xavier St., - Montreal 



The Man on This Fence 




shows why the 

'DILLON ' HINGE STAY FIELD FENCE 

is the best for you and your customers. 
The hinge of the stay prevents the 
fence from sagging. Take the weight off 
the fence and the stays spring back. 
Your farmer customers will buy the 
"Dillon" before any other. 

Write and ask us about your profit. 

THE OWEN SOUND WIRE FENCE CO., Limitefl 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

n I i l Messrs. Caverhlll, Learmont & Co., Montreal 
OOIQ DY | Messrs. Christie Bros. Co., Limited, Winnipeg 
(The Abercrombie Hardware Co., Vancouver 



Quick Deliveries 



Our Specialty 




Send us your orders for Cutlery, 

Electroplate and Solid Nickel 

Silver Flatware 




GUARANTEE 

The McGlashan, Clarke Co. guarantee their Alaska 

McG., C. Co. brand ol goods to be the same special 
high grade metal throughout as on the surface. In quality, finish and design they are superior to all others. There being no plating; to wear off, they 
■sul last a lifetime it properly cared for. Every box contains our guarantee and every piece warranted to give perfect satisfaction. 



The McGlashan, Clarke Co., Limited 



Niagara Falls, Ont. 



Shear making "up-to-date" is found in 

HEINISCH 

TAILORS' SHEARS, 
TRIMMERS, SCISSORS, 
TINNERS' SNIPS, ETC. 

"Best in the World" 

Since 1825, and a steady increase in sales 
due to their superior cutting quality. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 

NEWARK, N.J., U.S.A. 

New York Office and Salesroom, 155 Chamber! St. 




TRADE WITH ENGLAND 



Every Canadian who wishes to trade 
successfully with the Old Country 
should read 

"Commercial Intelligence" 

(Th« oddroaa la 108 Floot St., 
London, England.) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual 
subscription, including postage, $4.80.) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed 
to advertise without charge in the paper. 
See the rules. 



14 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their adver- 
tisement in this paper. 



1 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
•!~H-H~H~M-H-M~H~!-H"H-H~H~ .H~M~W-H~H~H~H~K •!"!"H~:~H-^-H~!~!~!~H~!~!~!":"!~S~H~!~!~:~:~W--!~!~i 

Save tKe Cost of Heating 

By using' TKe 20th Century White Flame Burner 



Heats and Lights any room at the convenience and cost of light only. 



No Smohe 
No Dirt 
No Odor 




Burns 
eitKer 
Manufac- 
tured 
or Natural 
Gas 



Fits any standard gas fixture, bracket or portable. In spring and fall it will keep the house comfort- 
able, curtailing furnace and stove time, while in winter, even with a furnace, there are bath and other rooms 
better for extra heat, ESPECIALLY WHEN HAD AT NO EXPENSE BEYOND THAT OF 
ILLUMINATION. Order through your jobber, or if he cannot supply, write us. 

Ontario Lantern and Lamp Co., Limited 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 

Agents— Wm. T. Gro3e, Montreal, Que. E. W. Hickson, Toronto, Ont. Bissett & Loucks, Winnipeg. Man. 

Chas. H. Fox, Vancouver, B.C. 

• l"l " I " M " i " I " l '* M " M "i"t"I" I "I"I"I"I"H 

A RECORD BREAKING SELLER 



22 CALIBRE 
16 SHOT 




" ■ — — ■■ 



' 



_,_ 



HOPKINS & ALLEN'S 



MILITARY BOLT ACTION REPEATING RIFLE 



7C^ There has long been a demand for a good rifle at this price— and the 

HOPKINS & ALLEN Junior Repeater fills the bill. This rifle has been and 

LIST * s being extensively advertised, and a heavy sale for it is created. 

SPECIFICATIONS :— 22-inch barrel, take-down, 22 calibre. Magazine handles 22 short, 22 long and 22 
long rifle cartridges without change of carrier. Shoots 16-22 short or 12-22 long or long rifle cartridges 
Action, Militaty Bolt Pattern with positive safety device. Length over all, 40 inches, weight S l / 2 pounds. 



$ 



10 



FOR SALE BY ALL FIRE- 
ARMS JOBBERS. 




PLENTY OF GOOD SUPPLE- 
MENTARY ADVERTISING 
MATTER— FREE. 





WRITE TOR CATALOGS 



THE HOPKINS & ALLEN ARMS CO. 

3 City Road, Finsbury Square, London OCpt 67, NORWICH, CONN., U.S.A. 



is 




Shows Bolt Drawn Back— Position for Ejecting 
Shells. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FURNACE SATISFACTION 

Apart from the Shrewd Dealer's desire to handle The Best Furnace the exigen- 
cies of business compel all wise Hardwaremen to stock and recommend That Particular 
Furnace which yields most satisfaction to their customers. It's an easily proven fact 
that The Empire King: is known from ocean to ocean as The Furnace that satisfies. 

Here are some of the reasons for superiority of 




The 



Empire King 
Furnace 



Simplicity of construction. The Empire King has few parts — therefore few 
joints. Furnaces having a large number of parts and complicated flues are trouble- 
creators and soon become useless. 

Low Built. A low cellar ceiling does not eliminate the comforts a first-class 
heating apparatus affords. Base ring— is strong, heavy and solid— a fitting foundation 
for The Best Furnace. 

Ask for more reasons why you should talk the Empire King Furnace. 



The Canadian Heating and Ventilating Co., 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 



LIMITED 



THE CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO.. 126 West 
Craig St.. Montreal. Que., Agents for the Province of 
Quebec. 



THE CHRISTIE BROS. CO.. Limited. 238 King St., Winnipeg, 
Man., Western Agents. 
The Abercrombie Hardware Co., Vancouver, B.C. 



Aluming^" s %JDlectric 

On^HeaTterx 




<*•; 

* 



These heaters are self sellers. Their eood qualities are "<*■ 

not hidden -yon don't have to talk good points — Hie 

Heaters show them. See burner below. Then there's the 

satisfaction which comes to the salesman when he knows he has sold 

pomethiug that lives riffM up to every claim. Over a MILLION 

times we've (riven salesmen this satisfaction. 

Can't smoke or "smell"— impossible to explode— heats like a stove. 
not" like a lamp- throws the beat right down to the floor and sides — 
wicks easily -never requires dealer's further attention. 

Because we've proven these statements the "Alumino" and "Electric" 
are now admitted standard by all who know oil heaters. Can any dealer 
afford to be without a standard line? Maximum quality at minimum cost. 
Let us have your order promptly— the demand is something fierce. 

f ± LEWIS BROS., Ltd., 

^— v MONTREAL TORONTO OTTAWA 

Ijsst* WINNIPEC VANCOUVER CALOARY 



EMERSON & FISHER, Ltd. ,* 

8T. JOHN, N.B. tmf* 






al view showing* coa- 

■traction tfrand'Safe'y Burmr" 

A -Klamc Spreader; B— Air 
space outside of wick Vtr 
space imide of Wick Tubr ; 
D Wick. 




& 



C^V^' 







E Outside Casing to 
burner; F - Air space be- 
tween Fount and Out- 
side Casing; O— Fount 
for oil. entirely separate 
from burner; H — Feed 
Pipe carrying oil from 
Fount to burner. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



U 



GOOD CHEER STEEL RANGES 



TH E 



SUNRAY 

A moderately priced 
first-class steel range 

4-hole top, with 18 inch oven 
6 " " 20 

with cast base or on feet. 



The attractiveness of design 

speaks for itself, and we 

guarantee the 

quality A1 . 




THE JAS. STEWART MFG. CO., LIMITED, WOODSTOCK, ONT. 

Western Warehouse, James Street, Winnipeg, Man. 



i7 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




The Points That Sell a 

warm air register, are economy and efficiency. These are the points, 
easily proven, which make the 

JONES SIDE-WALL REGISTER 

the most saleable register on the market. Its construction makes it 
the cheapest to instal and the healthiest and most satisfying in daily 
use. 

Writ* and ask us for the proof! 

The Jones Register Co. 



732 King St. West 



Toronto, Canada 



Wrought Steel Registers 



Standard Sizes, All Finishes 
Perfect Operating Device 
Unusually Large Air Space 
For Sale by Leading Jobbers 



HART (EL COOLEY CO. 

New Britain, Conn., U.S.A. 




H. & C. No. WO. 



FERROSTEEL REGISTERS 



The only house in the world manufacturing 



CAST IRON FLOOR 

SEMI STEEL FLOOR 

WROUGHT STEEL FLOOR 

CAST IRON SPECIAL SIDE WALL 

WROUGHT STEEL SPECIAL SIDE WALL 

FLAT OR CONVEX EXTRA SHALLOW SIDE WALLS 

DEFLECTORS, PANCAKES, WAFERS 



In all Designs and Finishes. 

Mechanism Perfect. 

Capacity Greatest. 

Finish Unsurpassed. 

No reputable line can undersell us. 




'SHBHEKHJEr 



MOORISH DESIGN 



FERROSTEEL COMPANY, - 



CLEVELAND, OHIO 



"Brantford 



" ASPHALT &« 
RUBBER 



Roofin g 



The Climate of Canada probably is more severe on Roofing material than any other. Shingles warp and curl, Tin and 
Iron sweats and rapidly rusts out. Corrugated Iron expands and contracts until it is useless as a protection against the 
elements. Coal Tar runs and clogs the drain pipes and gutters in Summer and cracks and opens up in the cold of Winter. 
To meet and overcome these difficulties " Brantford Roofings" are manufactured. For more than twenty-five years this 
Roofing has been made in the United States, under another name. WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES. 



BRANTFORD ROOFING CO., LIMITED 



Brantford, Ont. 



18 



II \ \< I) \V \ k E \ N I) \l E I \ I. 



ii 



Keystone Brand 
Solid Back Brushes 



now recognized as the standard. 

The proof of the quality of these 
Brushes is to be found in the 
IMMENSE INCREASE IN 
SALKS, necessitating the erection 
of LARGE NEW ADDITIONS 
with floor space of 85,000 square' 
feet. 

If you want the Best, 
Buy Keystone Brand. 

Manufactured ri 



j Stevens-Hepner Company 



Limited 



Port Elgin, Ontario 



The Howland Pump Oiler 



FOR SALE BY 




J. H. Ashdown Hdw Co., 
Geo. D. Wood & Co., 
Miller-Morse Hdw. Co., 
Jas. Robinson & Co., 
Lewis Bros., Ltd., 



Winnipeg 



Montreal 







A slight 

pressure of the 

thumb 

regulates the 

flow. 



Maple City Manufacturing Co. 

Monmouth, III, 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




You May Be a Good Salesman 

But, is everything in your favor? Are you selling 
the new Imperial Oxford ? A continuous stream of 
repeat orders tells the story to us. 



Removable Nickel 
Removable Fire Linings 
An Oval Firebox 
The "Divided Draft" 



All contained by 
the best looking 
stove in the mar- 
ket. 



It gives a good salesman a chance to spread 
himself. 

Drop us a card, or, better still, tell us the size 
range you want on your floor. If you get this 
agency you're lucky. 

TKe Gurney Foundry Company, Limited 

Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver Hamilton and London 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO.. LIMITED. MONTREAL. Qui. 
THE GURNEY STANDARD METAL CO., LIMITED. CALGARY, Alta.. >nd EDMONTON. Alta. 



STOVE BOARDS 



WITH SIZES STAMPED ON BACK AND CORNERS CRIMPED 



Crystallized and Lithographed m 
Wood-lined 

Square 

26 x 26 in. 28 x 28 in. 
30 x 30 in. 32 x 32 in. 

Oblong 

24 x 32 in. 25 x 36 in. 
28 x 41 in. 




Crystallized and Stencilled 
Wood-lined 

Square 

26 x 26 in. 28 x 28 in. 

30 x 30 in. 32 x 32 in. 

36 x 36 in. 

Oblong 

24 x 32 in. 25 x 36 in. 
28 x 41 in. 



NEW AND ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS FOR 190ft 



We Shi|) Order* Quickly 



The McClary Mfg. Co. 



LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, 

HAMILTON, CALOARY 



ST. JOHN, N.B., 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



I WILL TALK 



to practically every Hardware merchant in Canada from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific I cannot do it all in one day, but during the first twenty-four hours 
1 will deliver your message to every Hardware merchant in ( )ntario. 1 travel 
all day Sunday and on .Monday morning there will not be a village within 
the limits of Halifax in the East and Brandon in the West, into which I 
will not have penetrated. 

I cannot go any further East, so I now devote all my energies to the 
West, and so many new towns are springing up here each week that I 
haven't as much time as I used to have to enjoy the scenery. But I like 
talking to hardwarcmen, clerks, travellers and manufacturers, especially 
as they are always glad to see me and hear the news I have to tell them. 
Tuesday noon 1 am at Calgary, Wednesday noon at Kamloops, and by 
Thursday morning I reach Vancouver, having been in all the mining towns 
and all through the fruit districts of British Columbia. 

I have been eighteen years on the road and I have a pretty good con- 
nection. I never intrude when a man is busy, but just bide my time, be- 
cause I know men pay far more attention to what you have to say if you 
catch them when they have a few moments to spare. So 1 often creep 
into their pocket when they are going home at night, and when supper 
is over Mr. Hardwareman usually finds me. He must be glad to see me, 
because he listens to what I have to say for an hour or more. 

I try to always tell the truth, and men put such confidence in what I 
say that I would feel very sorry to deceive them even inadvertently. Prob- 
ably some other week I will tell you about the different classes of people I 
meet. In the meantime if you want a message delivered to II.VRD- 
WAREMEN, PLUMBERS, CLERKS, MANUFACTURERS or TRAV- 
ELLERS — and want it delivered quickly — I'm your man. 




THE WANT AD MAN 



Condensed Advertisements in Hardware and 
Metal cost 2c. per word for first insertion, 
ic per word for subsequent insertions. Box 
number 5c. extra. Send money with adver- 
tisement. Write or phone our nearest office 



Hardware and Metal 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



21 



\\ \\< DWA R E \ ND m E T \ I 



To 



EVERY MAN 

who uses 

Fire Bricks 

We handle the best makes of Scotch 
Fire Bricks, and our prices are right, 
but there are occasions when you 
must have more refractory materials, 
and then please remember that we 
are the Canadian representatives of 
the 

"HARBISON WALKER REFRACTORIES" 
COMPANY 

and this should indicate that we are 
the Fire Brick House of Canada. 

Others of our exclusive specialties 
are 

Lafarge 

Non-Staining Cement 

Iron Clad 

Portland Cement 

United Paving 

Bricks 



Best in the 
World 



Enamelled Bricks 

All Colors 

Drain Pipes 
Plaster, etc. 



Francis Hyde&Co. 

KING, QUEEN and WELLINGTON STS. 
MONTREAL 




THERE IS MONEY IN 



"Diamond" brand Fittings 

because they are quick and constant sellers. Best of 

material, perfect threads and the finest finish 

are the reasons why. 

We protect you by selling: wholesale only. 

OSHAWA STEAM & OAS FITTING CO., 

OSHAWA, CANADA 



LIMITED 



Don't Stop 




to ask your neighbor, lift 
the load yourself with 

The Burr Self-Locking 
Tackle Block. Saves the labor of two or three 
600 to 5,000 pounds capacity. 



Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Mnnro Wire Works, Winnipeg 
Vokes Hardware Co., Toronto 
F. Hamilton & Co., Hamilton 
The Burr Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio 



DON'T TAKE CHANCES, BECAUSE IT 
DOESN'T PAY TO DO SO 

You can make any and all claims for Furnace Cement if you have stocked with 

Sterne's Asbestos Stove and 
Furnace Cement 

because it is more durable, economical and has more heat-resisting power than 
any other Cement on the market. Every pound guaranteed. 

O. F\. STERNE & SONS, 

BRANTFORD, - - ONTARIO 



Covert IVIfg. Oo. 




60-8wi»el. 



510— Double. 




AN ARM8TR0NC B0RINC TOOL 

is always ready for use Should be on 
ev ry lathe. Saves all forging. 7u per cent 
Grinding; 9 percent, ttol steel. 
Write for catalogue. 



ARMSTRONG BROS. 

TOOL CO., 
106 N. Francisco 

Ave., 
CHICAGO. I'. S. A. 




5= 




*^V'^VV>*VV/VV^^VWV/VVl^vvv'^/-/vv. 




^Ifcrn^d^- 



'■WAMAW- 



SIMONDS HAND SAWS 

are good sellers. Dealers should send for 1907 Catalogue and discounts. 

SIMONDS MANUFACTURING CO. 

Fitch burg, Mass. 

Branches Throughout The United States 



SIMONDS No. Sy z 

This Saw is of the general style 
and shape which carpenters have 
been accustomed to using for years 
past. Has a carved apple handle 
with highly polished sides and edges, 
making a very pretty Saw. Holds its 
cutting edge and saws true. Its high 
quality and even temper are due to 
the fact that it is Made of Simonds 
Steel. Covered by the broadest 
Simonds warranty. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




<£*f 




*$$&** j~ 



w, 




/ 




A Better Metal Chain Guard 

Just as soon as the trade knew that we 
were ready to market our improved Metal 
Chain Guard, our construction department 
was almost swamped with orders. 

Shrewd dealers recognized this Guard as 




an important constituent of The Wise Buyers' 
line. The big bicycle boom in Canada should 
mean lots to you. It will— if you secure our 
catalogue and stock our bicycle accessories. 



Forsyth Manufacturing Co. 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

W. F. Caravan, 13 St. John Street, Montreal, Representative 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE MERIT OF 

Standard Ideal Porcelain 

Enameled Ware 




is recognized by the leading dealers in Plumbing Equipment. Standard 
Ideal Ware is well constructed, durable in character and of designs 
calculated to meet the requirements of the Canadian Trade. 

We manufacture Bath Tubs, Sitz Baths, Shower Baths, Lavatories, Urinal 
Ranges, Slop Hoppers, Laundry Tubs, Sinks, Closet Ranges, Steamship Sup- 
plies, Railway Car Supplies, Hospital Appliances. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

The Standard Ideal Co., Limited 

Head Offices and Factories, - PORT HOPE, Ont. 

Sales Offices and Sample Rooms, 50 Colborne Street, TORONTO, 
128 West Craig Street, MONTREAL, and 24 Telfer Block, WINNIPEG 



E N I » C ' S 




PATENT 

COW 
TIES 



These cow ties 
have stood the test 
for years. 

Undoubtedly t h e 
best and strongest 
on the market. 

It will pay to 
handle only the 
best. 



A complete line 
of all sizes ready 
for shipment. 



For Sale 
by all Jobbers 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 



LIMITED 




GENUINE 



It Pays to Stock Our Lines 





"SATURN 



"SATURN" 



"SATURN" 



Plain Compression Grease Cups 

A good cup for general use. Made of 
red metal and well finished. 

PENBERTHY INJECTOR CO., LIMITED, 



AUTOMATIC INJECTOR 

The choice of all intelligent 
engineers and manufacturers. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER. 



NA/ I IM D 



OF?, O IM T . 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Manufacturcts of 

Iron and Steel Wire 

Barb Wire 

Galvanized Wire 

Coiled spring Fencing 

Brass Wire 

Copper Wire 

Wire Nails 

Wood Screws 

Staples 

Jack Chain 

Bright Wire Coods 

Spring Cotters 

Steel Wire Barrel Hoops 



WIRE MANUFACTURING CU. 

MONTREAL TORONTO "■"" 

Do not put off' too long in sending us your 
specification for 

WIRE NAILS 

WOOD SCREWS 

HAY BALING WIRE 

We want to satisfy all our customers and 
for this reason we offer the above advice. 



ITS A LATCH THAT EVERY BARN NEEDS 

WHITCOMB 

STEEL 
BARN 
DOOR 
LATCH 




It is convenient; it is strong: 
it is durable; it is adapted to any 
thickness of door ; and harness, 
etc., will not catch on it. Fully 
guaranteed. 

Cet a sample and see what an 
excellent Latch it is. 



ALBANY HARDWARE SPECIALTY MFG. CO. 

M.n U f. ? tor.r. PATENTED SPECIALTIES BY CONTRACT 

ALBANY, WISCONSIN, U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



1 H. BOKER &l CO.'S CUTLERY I 




Recommend Boker's Pocket Knives, Scissors and Razors, if you want 
to work up a good Cutlery trade, and at the same time insure for yourself 
\ a good profit. You can double your cost price on every sale and still give good value 
« and satisfaction to your patrons. 

| FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES 




Will Hold up A Shell 

That's what a shelf brackets for. 
For this purpose there can be 
Nothing Better Nothing 
O h k a p e k than the BRADLEY 8TEEI 
BRACKET. It is well Japanned. Strong and 
Light. The Baviuy on freight is a good profil 
aside from the lower price at which the good? 
are sold. Order direct or through your jobbers 

ATLAS MFC. CO., New Haven. 





"Quality Unsurpassed 



99 




IOH-ORADE MATERIAL, 
StcillecJ Workmen, 

Up-to-date Equipment, 

Careful Supervisioi 

Account for the success of 

Belleville ^ Brand 

HORSE SHOES 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Toronto and Belleville Rolling Mills 





HOW TO BUILD A GOOD FENCE : /vti£SK 



Everyone Intending fence building should send for our folder on Erecting; 
Fence*. It's full of valuable information on fence building, tells how to erect 
woven wire fencing quickly and substantially, describes the manufacture of 
fence wire and has an article quoted trom bulletin of U. S. Dept. of Agriculture 
on concrete post making, showing how these durable posts can be economically 
made at home. Don't fail to write for acopy. It'sfree. 

THK liANH ELL HOX1E WIRE FENCE CO., Ltd. 
Dept. J Hamilton, Ontario. Winnipeg, Manitoba. 

M^ ^—— — ^—^— ^IM^^Wi — — — H— — S 
26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOOLS SELL THE CHEAPEST, 
WISE MEN THE BEST 




THE BEST 



Being supported by good and liberal advertising among the 
actual users of saws 



SPEER & JACKSON, LIMITED 



/ETNA WORKS 



SHEFFIELD, ENC. 




RUBEROID 

A ROOFING WITH AN 
EARNED REPUTATION 



There is only one prepared roofing for which service of 15 years can be 
claimed and proved — that is RUBEROID. 

It was the first smooth-faced, elastic, weather-proof rooting made. Its record 
is not .and cannot be equalled by any other rooting. 

Being absolutely free from tar paper, RUBEROID will not melt, rot or corrode. 
Neither will it rust like tin or metal, nor crack from vibration like asphalt or slate. 

On account of its elasticity, it contracts and expands to the requirements 
of heat or cold. 

Send to-day for booklet and samples of RUBEROID. 



THE STANDARD PAINT CO. OF CANADA, 



LIMITED, 



Board of Trade Building, - MONTREAL, P.Q. 

FACTORIES AT LACHINE CANAL. HIGHLANDS, P.Q. 

LOCKERBY (S» McCOMB, Selling Agents for Ontario and Quebec. 

27 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Recommend THe Best 



Sinew il dealers not only recommend the besl window glass — they also stock 
it. There's a reason for it. Once your customer becomes convinced that 
his interests are yours, you've secured his trade for all time. 

While high-grade, almost Imperishable, 

WINDOW GLASS 



is our specialty, we also manufacture Fan Lights, Door Lights, Hall 
Windows, Side Lights, etc., made in Copper, or German Silver Bars. 

Our catalogue should be on every dealer's desk. A post card brings it 
to you. Write to-day for particulars. 

The Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited 

LONDON TORONTO WINNIPEG 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 

Manufacturers RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 

¥V HIGH-GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES 

MONTREAL. 



A Certain Sense 

of Satisfaction 



1830 1907 



MEYMOUltS 
SHEARS 



STANDARD 

FOR OVER 
HALF A CENTURY 

FULLY WARRANTED 






Above is a reproduction of Show Card 9 in. x 15 in. in colors which we will send free lo dealers in 

exchange for business card. 

HENRY T. SEYMOUR SHEAR COMPANY. WIEBUSCH AND HILGER, LIMITED, Sole Agents, NEW YORK 

28 




goes with every MERRELL PORTABLE HAND 
MACHINE, PIPE THREADING aud CUTTING 
MACHINE. We build them that way. 

For doing ALL kinds of threading— under ALL con- 
ditions— labor trouble and faulty material included 
— whete speed, durability and ease of control count 
for something, our word to you is to investigate the 
MERRELL. 

Whether it be stationary or portable — hand or 
power driven— 30 DAYS FREE TRIAL must 
prove conclusively that your choice should be the 
MERRELL. 

This Portable Hand Machine has encased gears, 
MERRELL standard quick opening and closing die- 
head, and the latest improved Cutting-off Knife. 

Let us tell you more about this machine — The 
Chasers, Vise and the large range of work covered. 

Catalogue for the asking. 
Quick shipments. 

m CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO. 

Solo Agents for Canada Limited 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Your Customer is Annoyed 

when the handle of his axe breaks at the critical 
moment. Ho blames you for it. But he will 
never be annoyed this way if you sell him only 



P'ro, 
Ohe* 



perial arid 
mpion 



AXE HANDLES 



They are the strong kind. They are made to 
be used ; and it takes a lot of abuse to break 
'em. The same qualities of durability are 
found in every HAMMER, SLEDGE and PICK 
HANDLE shipped from our factory. 



Free lists and discounts sent upon request. 



J. H. Still Manufacturing Co. 



ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO 



Limited 



» «infK/tr/* 

^W -Qnffoln NY 



^ 



Buffalo, N.Y, 



4 




When you gee our goods >ou 
know you get THE BEST. 

Wf manufacture 
Water Filters 
Water Cooler* 
Chafing Dishes 
Table Kettles ana 

Stands 
Coffee Extractors 
Wine Coolers 
Nursery Chests 
Baking Dishes 
Crumb Trays and 

Scrapers 
Tea and Bar Urns 
Bathroom Fixtures 
Coal Vases and 

Hods 
Candles tic ks 
Cuspidors 
Match Safes, Etc. 

All High Grade, and ex- 
ceedingly presentable. 

Ripresentad by 

h. f. Mcintosh & co. 

51 range Street, 
TORONTO. - ONT. 



Write for Catalogue 



<^ Z N. 




FOR PLATE 



Will Call on You 

Our Canadian representative is 
calling on the trade from Montreal 
to Vancouver. His trip will oc- 
cupy about three months. He 
will be pleased to show you our 
complete line of Silverware, 
Cutlery, Flasks, etc. 
Kindly address the Montreal 
office, making an appointment. 

Z5f>e House of Hutton 

Etiabli.hed in England in 1SOO 



Sole Canadian Agent 
W.J.GRANT, Lindsay Bldg., MONTREAL 



>.OE Kf 4 




WE WANT YOUR ORDERS 





The season for fall repairs is almost here. Are jou 
fortified with a good stock of our 

Troughing, Pipe and Elbows ? 

Our lines are made with greater care, and are, there- 
fore, erected more easily and with less solder than any 
other. Send us a trial order. 

"WE WORK WITH THE TKADE." 

T&8M6lalsliiinlfi&Sii£Co. 1 LimiM 



Montreal 



ST. JOHN. N.B. 
Emerson & Fisher. Limited 
CALGARY 
Ellis & Grofan 



Preston, Ont. 

SALES AGENTS: 



Toronto 



WINNIPEG 

QUEBEC Clare i. Brocket! 

A. Bernard VANCOUVER 

McLennan, McFeely & Co.. Limited 



FOR CUTLERY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



^ > ° ««, World's Best Cutlery 

^j^^ fe»I^f4 You make no mistake in specifying goods made by 

^ JOSEPH RODGERS &. SONS, Limited 

^^ANTEID »" when ordering cutlery. A reputation of over 200 years 

at stake, insures the quality of every article. 

Write for catalogues from Sole Canadian Agents 

JAMES HUTTCN & COMPANY, MONTREAL 



CLOUDY" SURFACES 

come from using "Majestic" furniture 
polishes. When applied according to 
directions the result is a brilliant lustre 
— none of those smeared surfaces so 
common to many so-called polishes. 

Free from grit and dirt, " Majestic" 
furniture polish is all a furniture polish 
should be. 

Write for samples and prices. 72 
MAJESTIC POLISHES, Limited 

575 Yonge Street, Toronto, Canada 





The John Morrow Screw, Limited 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Set and. Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety ot finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONTARIO 



Have You Ever Noticed 



The Silver Grind 

which is such a striking characteristic of the 
Newmarket Clipper? It is a kind of whistling 
sound, and means Perfect Grinding, Perfect 
Balance of Cutting Tension, Perfect Bearing of 
Cutting Edges. This is 

Handicraftmanship 

pure and simple, and can only be obtained by 
skilled and experienced workmen, who have 
had the secret handed down to them from 
their forefathers. 

We hold that Secret 

and this explains why our machines keep their 
edge so long, and will clip 3, 4 or 5 times as 
many horses as other makes. 

We ask you to bear these facts in mind when 
placing your orders for the coming season. 






THE ORIGINAL 
NEWMARKET CLIPPER. 



THE BURMA* No. 13 
POWER HORSE CLIPPER. 



Burman & Sons, Ltd,, Lee Bank Works, Birmingham, England 



D o 



i if 

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THE NEVtIUp.V 



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Expert Bookkeeping 



Investigation and auditing of all classes 
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AND AT BRANDON, MAN. 



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GALYSng 

the CANADA METAL CO. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO. 



CHARLES H. FOX 

Vancouver, Canada 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 
Selline to the Hardware Jobbers Only. 
RoDretenting Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers, correspondence Invited. Cable 
Aderess, Chasfex Vancouver, P.O.Bex 1106. 



30 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



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Dept. 71 Plymouth, Mich. 




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Branch Offices and Warehouses: WINNIPEG AND VANCOUVER 



fi?b 




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HARDWARE AND MET\I. 



Hardware Convention at Detroit 



The editor of Hardware ami Metal 
spent a few days in Detroit last week at- 
tending the thirteenth annual convention 
of Hie Michigan Retail Hardware As 
Bociation. Daring the thirteen years' 
existence of this organization a record 
for progressiveness has been built up, 
the tangible result being an association 
comprising (177 members enthusiastically 
paying an annual membership lee of 
$4. 

Michigan's need for a retail hardware 
association is no greater than Ontario's, 
hut the lesson of organization was earl} 

learned and there are now few reputable 

retail hardware linns in the state outside 
the organization. And the interest 
shown in the annual convention was 
amply proven bv the attendance of about 
.~>.>u of the members at Detroit in spite 
of the fact that all efforts to secure 
special rates from the railway compan- 
ies were futile. Paying full fares going 
and coming the hardwarenieu gathered 
from every part of the state, many bring- 
ing I heir wives and daughters with them. 
Fully 75 per cent., however, of the de 
legates in attendance were young men 
under 35 or 40 years of age, l his giving 
a vigorous tone to the gathering and 
making tin' meetings lively and enter- 
taining. 

The object of the editor's visit was 
to see how our I'niled States cousin-. 
conducted their association and learn 
from their experience lessons which 
may be of value to the hardwaremen 
of Canada, who as yet, are comparative- 
ly new to association work. 

The first fact which impressed itselt 
upon the visitor was the marked interesl 
manifested in the convention by the 
large number of delegates present. True, 
some attended the hall game, enticed 
away by jobbing house salesmen over- 
anxious to entertain customers, hut there 
were \\'\\ vacant seals left in the large 
convention hall during any of the ses- 
sions, and the delegates listened atten- 
tively to the various addresses and dis- 
cussions. 

Pure Paint Legislation. 

The subjects demanding' the attention 
of the delegates were much the same as 
those which would interest a Canadian 
convention id' retail hardwaremen. First, 
came the subject of pure paint, a topic 
which has won considerable importance 
since the praiseworthy efforts id' Prof. 
Ladd, of North Dakota, to check the sale 
of idieap, adulterated mixed "paints" 
and white lead put on the market by 
mail order houses and unscrupulous 
manufacturers. Representatives of the 
Paint Manufacturers' Association and 
National Demi Company attended the De- 
troit convention and delivered addresses, 
pointing out that they approved of Prof. 
Ladd's work ami were assisting in his 
experiments as well as in getting pure 
paint laws adopted by the various state 
legislatures. The growing importance of 
this subject is worthy of note, as the 
Ontario Retail Hardware Association 



executive now have the matter oJ white 
lead adulteration and markin 
considerat ion. 

Another important subject disenssed 
was the evei p 

compel ii ion. The delegates were cheer- 
ed by the announcement that, owing \<> 
the refusal of many large hardware 
man uf act urers to allow thei ds to 

be listed in mail order catalogues two 
large Chicago mail order concerns had 
withdrawn from their catalogues the 60 
to SI) pages devoted to hardware 

While the campaign against this form of 

sidling is producing good results, the 
evil still manifests itself in many ways, 
however, main delegates telling 
how consignments of catalogues were 
sent to express and freight agents for de- 
livery to farmers and others; The rail 

way c panics have given instructions 

to refuse to deliver them, however, and 
one agent who persisted in doing so near- 
ly lost his job as a resull of I In' activity 

of the association secretary. 

One hardwareman who had been a 
telegraph operator told id' how he had 

relieved an operator recent l\ to allow 
the fellow to attend a funeral. In the 
office he found seventeen undelivered 

mail order catalogues addressed to eus- 
tomers of his store and enquiry proved 

that '.17 boxes id' goods came to the de 
pot in one day. through sales encouraged 
by the operator. Needless to say. the 
hardwareman got busy and flic operator 
found il advisable to cut out that line 
of work. 

Parcels Post Legislation. 

A hardware jobber notified the con- 
vention that he had learned that the 
catalogue hone interests were preparing 
to have legislation introduced at the oexl 
session of Congress providing for the 
establishment of a parcels post system. 
enabling local merchants to send par 
eels up to ten pounds in weight to their 
customers by the rural mail carriers, etc. 
The plan is to disarm the opposition 
of the small retailers by having the law 
appear to he in their interest and then 
at the last minute an amendment would 
be introduced giving the large mail 
order concerns the same privileges ex 
tended to the little fellows. Truly a 
wily game, but the cat is out of the bag. 

Some very effective methods of oppos- 
ing mail order business were outlined al 

the convention, reference to which will 

be made in future issues when son f 

the addresses delivered will be repro- 
duced. 

Various trade evils were discussed. 

thirteen years of organization having 

failed to make the slate a paradise. Such 
evils as Selling to consumers. I'lc.. were 
not as much In e\ idence. how ever, as in 
Ontario, and the general feeling seemed 
to he far more friend I v . few stoi ies of 
price-cutting being heard. 

1'ioruinence was given to the subject 
of mutual tire insurance, one man telling 
of having received $36 as a refund on a 
payment ot f>90 made i. mutual hard- 

33 



ware companies at old line company 
Secretary Seotl ttated that much 
of the success of the Mich ocia 

lion was due to the benefits received 

from mutual insurance. 

Secretary Peek, of Wisconsin, ami Na 
tional Vice-president Btebbins, of Min- 
nesota, delivered addressee on mutual 

lire insurance, the former telling of how 
lie Retail Hardware Association in 
Illinois had been built up bv canva 
for the hardware mutual companies, n 

being uecessarj to belong to the hard 
ware association before •' mutual policy 

could be obtained. 

Manufacturers' Exhibits. 

A feature of the gathering was the 
large number of exhibits made in the 
hotel parlors, rooms and corridors bv 
jobbers and ma n u fact urers selling to 
the hardware trade. The Cadillac Hotel 
provided the convention hall, rooms for 
executive, offices, etc., making no charge 
to the asosciation. They recompe i 
themselves, however, by charging Poi 
space for exhibits. 

Aliol her leal me of I he work in Miehi 
van is the publication of an annual sou 
venir. the jobbers ami manufacturers 
contributing liberally for adverti 

The s| fee does not cover all 
the expenses of the association, as the 

large amount of work requires a secre 

lary and an assistant secretary, bolh 
of whom receive small salaries. The 
deficiency is made up from the ••sou- 
venir" receipts. In Ontario the as- 
sociation has always stood entirely in- 
dependent, never having asked or re- 
ceived any money from the jobbers or 
manufacturers, although it is understood 
the latter intend to provide some en- 
tertainment at the next convention. The 
entertainment at Detroit consisted of an 
evening al an amusement park, a moon- 
light and banquet and auto rides for the 
visiiinu ladies. The exhibitors also 
handed out souvenirs, some of which 
\\ ere quite valuable. 

The "Question Dux" was. of course, 
one id' the most interesting and valuable 
features of the gathering. The "box" 
was open on the chairman's table dur- 
ing each session of the convention, the 
afternoon of the third day being devoted 
to the discussion. Keen interest was 
manifested in the short talks by the 
various members on subjects introduced 
through the questions asked. 

'I'he gathering, on the whole, was a 
huge success and undoubtedly resulted 
in much advantage to the trade. .Men 
who get together once a year ami talk 
over methods of business vvillf men in 
their own line in towns 50 or llio miles 
avvav are undoubtedly going In learn a 
few things and be more friendly with their 
nearbv competitors on matters of price 
cutting, earh etc. The money 

spent b\ retailers in attending the con 
vention and by those who provided the 
entertainment will be returned many 
limes ov er in all probability. 



H A R D W A RE AND METAL 



About Private Price Marks 

Some Important Secrets of the Cost and also Prices Ciphers of the Big; Retail 
Stores that may be Used by the Country Retailer if Desirable. 



Alniosl every merehanl lias a secret 
price mark. It is a business necessity. 
The greatest point in its favor is thai 
dealer who marks his articles with 
- not subject to comparisons of 
price, which the one price dealer al- 
ways has t<> complain of. 

The majority of dealers have a secret 
ode from which to determine the price. 
A great many of them so arrange this 
code thai they can tell th< is well 

at a glance. 

Most frequently the price code is ar- 
ea* on a word of nine or ten letters, 
in which word there are no two letters 
alike. The letters correspond with the 
numbers from one to ten. like this: 
m a n u script 
12345 6 7S9 
This i- the commonest and easiest 
way of marking the price. All dealers 
are familiar with it. but they seldom 
change their key-word, on account of 
lifficulfy of looking up a new word 
or the bother of becoming accustomed 
to the new code. 

It is essential that the key be changed 

. tor when two or three persons, 

aside from the clerks, know the key it is 

-s as far as any idea of secrecy is 

concerned. 

Nine Little Price Marks. 

Here is a list of nine-letter words 
which can be used for keys. They are 
all adapted to the use, they offer great 
variety, and are difficult to decipher. 
;e being nine lettered words, the o. 
or las! number, can be used as it stands, 
,„• any other letter or sign substituted 
for it. 
Thus. 

s i g n a t u r e 
12 34 5 fi 7 S 9 

Similar nine letter words are : 

cav'nioiis machinery 

blasphemy manifesto 

clerkship monastery 

dangerous nocturnal 

drinkable numerical 

dropsical obscurity 

duplicate observant 

facetious outwardly 

fisherman outspread 

gunpowder prudently 

hamstring pneumatic 

harmonize porcelain 

heptacord subaltern 

labyrinth voluntary 
longevity 

"Abruptness" also may be used in 
this class l>v substituting for the 
final ■•>•" 

The advantages of the nine letter word 
are many, they are simpler to remem- 
ber, simpler In read (on account of 
tli,. 0), and more inexplicable than the 
ten letter word-. The nine letter word, 



however, is not used as often as the 
ten letter word. 

List of Ten Letter Words. 

The following lisi of keys of ten let- 
ters will aid the dealer in picking out 
a new price mark: 

background lachrymose 

birthplace manipulate 

blacksmith manuscript 

chivalrous plastering 

daughterly pneumatics 

deacon ship profligate 

fishmonger formidable 

handsomely phlegmatic 

importable forgivable 

The following eleven letter words, also 
may be used by dropping the final let- 
ter, or using it as a repeater: 
Candlestick 
Disturbance 
Neighborly 

'fhe two words, "birthplace" and 
••blacksmith," in the ten letter list, are 
well fitted for pricemarks. Being double 
woids and each word containing five let- 
ters, they are much easier to remember 
and far simpler for the clerk to decipher. 

The simplicity is seen from the above, 
the first word ends with the number five 
and the second begins with number six. 
the letters being equally divided in the 
compound word makes the key much 
simpler. 

Using Hyphen for Figure. 
lint even more suitable is the hyphen- 
ated word. There are few, if any, deal- 
ers who have discovered and used this 
class of words for keys. They are ideal- 
ly adapted to such use. 

hailstone 
1234567390 
Other hyphenated words, which are 
suitable for price marks, are: 
back-slide 
hail-stone 
make-shift 
ship-board 
shop-lifter 
yard-stick 
The word "fish monger" also may be 
used, the same as "shoplifter," by cut- 
ting- off the final letter. 

Five is the most frequent number oc- 
curring in price marks. There usually 
is a five somewhere in the combination, 
and for this reason the type of words 
above makes the ideal work key. At a 
glance the clerk can read the dash or 
hyphen and it is confusing to the curious 
customer, who cannot account for a liu 
nre in a letter code, unless it represents 
a figure one or a naught. The five never 
is thought of by the investigator and 
easily thought of by I he clerk. In those 
two points lies the beauty of such a 
word for a price mark. 

34 



Letter X for a Repeater. 

The figure \. a- a rule, is used for a 
repeater 1 thus, with ••manuscript" for 
the key : 

Mstx— $V. 

It will be found in key words that the 
p's and m's predominate and words be- 
ginning with those letters are used by 
the majority of dealers. For that rea- 
son it wouhl be advisable to pick out 
one beginning with a letter other than p 
or m. 

There is some humor in price marks; 
lor instance, "shoplifter," as a constant 
reminder and warning to the clerk; 
"yardstick," how ironical it must sound 
to the "counter jumper." Think of a 
clerk determining the price of face pow- 
der from the key "gunpowder." Aim! 
how suitable the code "labyrinth" is to 
the new clerk winding in and out among 
the letters of the word in a vain effort to 
find the price of a 5-cent cake of soap, 

With the introduction of the spelling 
reform there has been an innovation in 
price marks. It opens up a wide field, 
and articles marked on such a key sure- 
ly are inexplicable. For instance, among 
the novelties are the following: 
Sell th gudz. 
Charg enuf. 
Plez be onist. 

The keys are novel and intricate, but 
it is not seriously thought, however, that 
many of the dealers will adopt this 
scheme of marking. 

Phrases Better than Words. 

Some merchants use phrases instead 
of words. For instance, a big wholesale 
jewelry house in New York uses the 
legend, "Now be sharp." A firm in 
Chicago uses, "Be watchful." Some 
houses think that phrases have certain 
advantages over mere words. 

Many merchants form keys upon their 
business names, for instance: 
Klein Bros. C. L. Hornsby. 

Born & Smith Jones Drug. 

Yalding Co. S. & G. Penfold. 

There is a personality about such a 
key that makes it of value to the mer- 
chant, and it is, as a rule, hard to de- 
cipher. 

A simple device, which is preferred by 
many, is plain figure marking, Tin; real 
figures are written down as a stock 
number, in a row. 

For instance, in 2468793: $4.80 would 
be the price mark. Beginning wih the 
first number and using every other num- 
ber as a blind, this is read easily and not 
as liable to mistake as the word method. 
This may be varied, beginning with the 
li'-sl and skipping every other one, read 
fug backwards, and divers other ways. 
Th" merit of this lies in its readability 
and simplicity, together with the fact 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



that it is usually taken for a stock num- 
ber, instead of a price mark. 
First Figure is Blind. 

An even simpler way is to use mere- 
ly one blind, as, 6,148. 

Price would be $1.48. 

Any letter or figure may be used for 
the blind. 

One objection to this is that an arti- 
cle marked to sell at less than a dollar 
often is sold for more, and the scarcity 
of figures would lead the customer to 
believe that the price came in two, rath- 
er than three figures. This easily may 
be overcome by using an extra figure, a 
plus sign, or an x, before the number 
io make the price look greater. 

This method often is used as a cost 
mark, the selling price being found by 
adding whatever per cent, profit is to be 
figured. 

A new method of cost marking which 
would be almost impossible to solve, and 
yet one which the clerk could handle 
and learn easily, is the following: 

For example/ 61483 : 6 is the "blind; 
148 is the cost; 3 is the figure which, 
multiplied by the cost, will give the sell- 
ing price. 

Curiosities in Cost Mark. 

Often a buyer picks up a line of goods 
at a bargain which he either can afford 
to sell cheaply as a leader, or which he 
prefers to get a better profit from. By 
this system of marking he can get 
whichever price he wishes and still know 
the original cost simply by looking at 
his price mark. 

There are some curiosities in price 
marks, which can be seen once in a while. 
For instance, a haberdasher in Clark 
street, in Chicago, uses Stevenson's 
"dancing man." The marks are curious 
but almost impracticable. 

The solution is that the number cor- 
respond to the various parts of Steven- 
son's famous "dancing man.' 

The various limbs must be made with 
care and even then there are frequent 
mistakes in the reading. The adoption 
of such a cipher scarcely is advisable. 

Probably the best mark possible never 
has been used. It is most simple and 
could be adopted with great safety for 
it is practiealy unknown. There is no 
code to it, nothing to remember, nothing 
to figure out. It 'is simply this, in put- 
tint: down a price mark merely use the 
preceding figure in the numerical scale 
instead of the real figure. 

An article to be priced $17.50 would 
be marked 0649. What could be more 
simple? What could be more practical? 

Or, by reversing the process the arti- 
cle priced at $17.50 would be marked 
2861, according to the following table: 
2345678901 
1234567890 

There are thousands of different price 
marks in use to-day. and more coming in. 
as the advisability of an exclusive mark 
grows upon the dealer. It is a business 
necessity, as is the frequent changing of 
the code or cipher for the sake of pro- 
tection. 

R. C .BROWN. 



LETTER BOX. 

Correspondence ou matters of interest 
to the hardware trado Is solicited. 
Manufacturers. Jobbers, retailers and 
clerks are urged to express their opin- 
ions ou matters under discussion. 

Any questions asked will be promptly 
answered. Do you want to buy anything, 
want some shelving, a silent salesman, 
any special line of goods, anything in 
connection with the hardware trade ? 
Ask us. We'll supply the necessary In- 
formation. 



L. P, Beauluc, Hawkeabury, Ont., 
writes : "Could you direct me where I 
could gel a hook or periodical that, 
would treat OH how to dress windows 
and make displays in a store where 
gents' furnishings, boots and shoes, 
and ready-made clothing are kept ?" 

Ans. A monthly periodical called the 
Merchants' Record and Show Window is 
the best medium wo know of treating 
on window dressing and store display. 
This paper is published by the Mer- 
chants' Record Co., 315 Dearborn St., 
Chicago, Til.— Editor. 

Kail Freeman, Bridgetown, N.S., 
writes : "Can you direct me to a maker 
of bottling and bottle-washing ma- 
chinery ?" 

Ans Communicate with J. J. Mc- 
Laughlin, Limited, manufacturing chem- 
ists, 145-155 Sherbourne St., Toronto, 
and they will give you the desired in- 
formation. — Editor. 



Retail Store Development. 

To the Editor : — 

In Hardware and Metal of the 17th 
inst. you call attention to the depart- 
ment store development and give illus- 
trations of the building additions being 
made in Toronto by the leaders of this 
class of business in Canada, namely, 
the T. Eaton Co. and the R. Simpson 
Co. 

These establishments have heen stead- 
ily growing larger. They must therefore 
be serving a legitimate purpose in the 
life of the community. It may therefore, 
he profitable to glance at their methods 
of doing business as seen hy an out- 
sider : 

Departmental stores are. as a rule, 
conducted without giving credit. The 
Hy. Morgan Co., Montreal, have re- 
cently ceased to give credit. They use 
printers' ink freely in advertising cata- 
logues and display cards. They dispose 
of seasonable goods before the end of 
the season for their use at any old 
price to clear so as to start the next 
season as nearly as possible with a 
fresh stock of the latest designs and 
patterns. This method accomplishes the 
removal of stock that would otherwise 
occupy valuable space and require re- 
handling several times before the next 
season. It makes cash available for use. 
It is the feature that gives the impres- 
sion that they sell cheap and attracts 
those who are looking for bargains. And 
what thrifty wife is not on the lookout 
for a bargain ? 

There is no overlapping of lines in one 
department with those sold in another, 
as is the case in the different branches 
of the retail trade. 

Their salespeople have short hours (8 
or 9) and are consequently alert and in 
condition to discharge their duties 

If these methods arc compared with 
the system of conducting retail business- 

35 



es, it will not be wondered at that they 
grow so rapidly. The reader will com- 
mence by this time to wonder why this 
article is headed Retail Store Develop- 
ment. It is preparatory to outlining 
what I feel confident must be the way 
of development for the retail merchant; 
that would distribute trade more even- 
ly and not require the long hours that 
the retailer is largely compelled to put 
in at present, trying to make a success 
of his business, often at the sacrifice of 
his health. The late John Macdonald 
stated in a book he wrote that nine out 
of ten men failed in business at some 
period of their life. The writer is one of 
them. 

Rev. Prof. Bland, in a sermon last 

Sunday in Sherbourne St. Methodist 
Church, Toronto, on "The Ideal City," 
stated that business competition stood 
in the way of many men being 
Christians ; that competition was, 
in a' sense, war. The writer some years 
ago heard him state that the man that 
brought goods together which he requir- 
ed, and sold them to him, was as much 
entitled to his thanks as the merchant 
had to thank him for his buying 
from him, and this is so. 

Business should be directed towards 
the doing away as far as possible with 
undue competition. 

In the manufacturing and transporta- 
tion businesses it has been found desir- 
able to co-operate and amalgamate. I 
believe it will be found desirable and 
necessary for smaller concerns to pur- 
sue the same course, namely, to co- 
operate and learn to work together. 

This will take time to bring about 
but it will be the part of wisdom for 
two of the same class of business serv- 
ing the same community to seek to co- 
operate and amalgamate ; then seek to 
amalgamate (in large places) the next 
congenial business and keep doing so 
until a similar business to a depart- 
mental store is evolved, only with this 
difference that at the head of each de- 
partment would be one interested in the 
welfare of the business with a know- 
ledge of its special requirements. Such a 
local concern could give its customers a 
service that would be more satisfactory 
and quicker than the departmental 
store. These stores could be scattered 
over a wider territory where they would 
be convenient to the homes which re- 
quire the lines sold. With your kind per- 
mission, I will reply to any questions 
sent you (the editor) during Septem- 
ber, bearing on this matter. 

"Retail Store Development." 



LOW-LIFT PLOW. 

D. Halloran, Paris Station, Ont., has 
invented an improved plow. The object 
of this inventor is to provide means 
to enable the plow to make a 
short turn; to permit it to be readily 
adjusted to regulate the depth of cut, 
to regulate the width of cut of the fur- 
row ; to enable its being readily lifted out 
of the ground or placed therein": to enable 
the rear furrow wheel to be locked in 
position or to run at will, and to pro- 
vide means whereby the wheel and 
pivotal connection of the plow with the 
main frame may be operated by the main 
lever. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE TRADE GOSSIP 



Quebec. 

.1. F Uu ill. Melbourne, Que . called 
last week in Montreal. 

Harrj Moulden, ol Taylor, Forbes I 
Guelph, was in Montreal again this 
week. 

.1 A. Paquin, St. Eustache, and C. 
( >. Jervas, St. John, wore in Montreal 
tlii^ week. 

VIi Bright, ..l Zip MIg. Co., Sutton, 
Que., called on the trade in Montreal 
t hi> v 

Mr. Pronhoffer, manager of theOrillia 
Construction Co., was in Montreal last 
week purchasing supplies. 

t; A. Jordan, of Caverhill, Learmont 
..v Co., Montreal, is spending his holi 
days on the Maine coast. 

Mr. Purvis, Calgary, was in Mum real 
this week, where he met his wife,, who 
has returned from England. 

Hanks Rucker, of Peck, Stow & Wil- 
cox Co., Southington, Conn., was call 
ing on ttic trade in Montreal last week. 

Ontario. 
D. A. Jones, hardware merchant, 

Beaton. Out., was in Toronto las! Sat- 
urday. 

The hardware firm of II. R. Mauders 
& Co.. Owen Sound. Out., have gone out 
of business. 

The hardware and tinsmithing busi- 
of D. Cowville. Maxville, Out., is 
being advertised for sale. 

The stock and premises of J. Weber, 
hardware merchant, Neustadt, Out.. 
suffered considerable damage by fire last 
Saturday. 

I). A. Husband, of Husband & Son. 
Wallaceburg, spent last week at Orillia 
as one of the delegates to the I.O.O.K. 
grand lodge. 

H. T. Eager, manager of the Toronto 
office of Wood. Vallance & Co., whole- 
sale hardware merchants, Hamilton, is 
spending a fortnight'* vacation in At- 
lantic City. 

Lawrence J. Lew, of United Factor- 
ies, Limited, has returned to Toronto af- 
ter a pleasant trip to Detroit and But 
falo. While in the former city Mr. Levy 
took in the Michigan State Hardware 
Dealers' convention. 

Mr. A. W. Wills, secretary of Un- 
ited Factories, Limited, Toronto, was 
at Old Orchard. Maine, at the time of 
the big fire last week, but is reported 
uninjured, being in the only hotel thai 
was left standing. He expects to arrive 
home early nex! week. 

A. E. Lech, who for the past year and 
a half has been inanasriim the financial 
end of the Nelson Hardware Co. 's busi- 
ness, at Windsor, has taken over the 
active business management. Wm. 
Moore, formerly in charge, is planning 
io go into busi his own account. 

.I. M. Brown, formerly of the hard- 
ware linn of Brown &, Mitchell, Bran- 
don, Man., i^ spending ■< Fev days in 
Toronto and i^ registered al the Walker 
House. Fifteen years ago Mi Brown 
started a hardware busim i tent 

al Brandon and to-day he takes rank 
among the sful bu 

men of the Prairie Province. 

1 1 ing to their large and ..... tan try in- 



creasing i>u-i ii.--.~- ami to facilitate citj 
deliveries. Rice, Lewis & Son, Toronto, 

wholesale hardware merchants, are an- 
nouncing lo their customers this week 
that an office has been opened al then 
new west-end warehouse. Pacific ami At- 
lantic Avenues, and thai orders lor iron 
ami steel will be taken and delivery made 

from that warehouse as well as from 

King ami Victoria Sis. 

Western Canada. 

Kakins A. Griffin, Shoal Lake, Man., 

have sold their hardware business to I>. 
McDonald & Co. 

Fire recently totally destroyed "he 
hardware store and stock of I). McDon- 
ald, Shoal Lake, Man 



CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & 
COS FIRE. 

Just as we go to press Caver- 
hill, Learmont & Co., Montreal, 
telegraph that the tire in their 
warerooms on Fridaj morning was 
confined to the top door of their 
St. Peter street building. 

Surplus stocks are earned in 
their Colborne street warerooins 
at Montreal, and they state that 
no delay whatever will he caused 
in get tins; out shipments of orders 
received by them. 

The loss cannot he estimated at 
time of writing, hut the (ire was 
prompt ly extinguished. 



The stock and premises of ' laincs «& 
Wvlie. hardware 'merchants, Oxbow, 
Sask., recently suffered loss by lire. 

C. Rudel, of the Canadian Fairbanks 
Co., Montreal, was in Winnipeg lasr 
week in connection with the western 
business of bhe company. 

A business change of some imporl 
recently took place in Sasfcattoon, Sask.. 
when the S. A. Clark Co., Ltd., took 
over the hardware concern formerly con- 
ducted by S. A. Clark. The new com- 
pany, Hie capital of which is S75,()00, 
numbers among the shareholders, I r. 
,1. II. C. Willoughby, Gerald Willou^h- 
by, A. -I. h:. Summer, S. A. Clark and 
I). M. Leyden. The last-named gentle- 
man is leaving iris position wifh Jas. 
Clinkskill on September 1st to take 
over the managership ol the new com- 
pany. 'I he S. A. Clark Co., Ltd , will 
continue business on Hie same lines as 
conducted by the old firm, although it 
is their intention in time to go largely 
into the wholesale and jobbing business 

BUILDERS' EXHIBIT. 

The first exhibition of builders' and 
contractors' supplies and hardware ever 
held in Canada, was held at Victoria 
imk. Montreal, on August 20, 21, 22. 
The exhibition was a very interesting one 
comprising every imaginable malen.il 
in building with an ( ■ < r u . 1 1 1 \ im 
posing display of interior equipments 
foi die inn hed structure, from plumb 

mpplil to wall papei I he i Ink 

bhrouehoul was tastefulL decorated 

iti. flags and bunting, and in the even 

| illumined with 

• ii lights and gas lamps, Altogethei 

•,. ,, one hundred and ' en boo' hi 

36 



and sixtj five exhibitors, some exhibi- 
tors exhibiting 111 two 01 more booths 
The exhibition was nol ouh interest 

ing, but was also very useful . not mere 
those directly connected with the 
building trade, but bo the general pub- 
lie, as the variety and novelt) of the 
articles on exhibition furnished interest- 
ing proof of the great progress being 
made in the science of architecture. 
Imongst the various lines of material 

displayed were plumbers' supplies, build- 
ers' supplies, wall paper, stained ;;lass, 
cut stone and imitations of cut stone, 
mosaic and other patent floorings, clcc- 
brical supplies, heating appliances, con- 
crete mixers, derricks, metallic worl 
paints and varnishes. 

Amongst the exhibitors at the build- 
ers' show were : The Canadian Fail 
banks Co., Maison Jean Paifuette, In- 
ternational Steel CO., P. I). Dods A C 
\I.11 1 in-Seiioui Faint Co., Metal Shingle 
& Siding Co., Dominion Radiator Co, 
Alex MeArthur & Co., Dodge Mfg. Co., 
Francis Hyde Co., Standard Paint Co 
Warden-King Co., Gurnev-Massev Co., 
Lockerby & McCoomb. 

All the exhibits were tastefully and 
effectively arranged, and Hardware and 
Medal hopes to publish in next week's 
issue illustrations of these various ex- 
hibits. 

To enliven the exhibition an orchestra 
was in attendance, with a vaudeville 
performance at frequent intervals. Al- 
together the show was interesting and 
•instructive, and should its success be a 
criterion of future exhibitions, it will 
prove a great benefit to the architec- 
tural world. 



ACME CAN WORKS' PICNIC. 

Employes of the Acme Can Works, 
Montreal, recently held their second an 
1 ma I picnic at Isle Gros P.ois. and a very 
enjoyable' one it was. Fully four hun- 
dred employes and friends were there 
and they all seemed to enjoy themselves. 
Jas. B. Campbell, the head of the com- 
pany, was on hand to help out with a 
word here and there. 

The programme of sports was a long 
.me ami every event was keenly con- 
tested. The winners: 

Boys' race. (I years and under I,'. 
Page; girls' race. f> years and under 
Mary Welsh; boys' race. 12 years and 
under — N. Desjardins; girls' race. 12 
years and under — Eva Beauchemin; 
boys' race, Ifi years and under — Hy. 
Laurendeau; girls' race, 10 years and 
under— Nellie McConnell; married 
holies' race— Mrs. T. H. Pratt; young 
ladies' race — Miss Morris; young men's 
race — A. Muncaster; sack race H. 
Colin; hop. step and jump — Thos. II. 
Pratt; putting 32-lb. shot— Nicola Lec- 
kas; prize waltz — George Chisholm 
and Miss Calarneau; committeee race 
Edward P. Pratt; married men's race — 
1) Dubeau; baseball match Tomato 
( '; ns vs. Corn Cans, won by Corn Cans; 
hiibv coine|il it ion, IS mouths and uudeT 

Winner. Marguerite DeOruehy, age is 
months; babj competition. IS month 
and three years Winner. Boris Beard, 
I years ; three legged race II. I John 
and E. Larin; tug-of-war Married men 
ingle men 1 n on b\ married men 1 ; 
In. ad jump- N. Fortis. 



HARDWARF, AND M E T \ I. 



Hardware- Metal 

Established 1888 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN President 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circulate in 
the Provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskat- 
chewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, 
New Brunswick. P.E. Island and Newfoundland. 

offices : 

Montreal, 232 McUill Street 

Telephone Main 1255 

Toronto 10 Front Street East 

Telephones Main 2701 and 2702 
Winnipeg, - - - 511 Union Bank Building 

Telephone 3758i 
London, Enq. .... 88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

J. Meredith McKim 
Telephone, Central 12960 

BRANCHES I 
Chicago. III. .... 1001 Teutonic Bldg 

J. Roland Kay 
St. John, N.B. - - - No. 7 Market Wharf 
Vancouver, B.C. - - - Geo. S. B. Perry 

Paris, France - Agcnce Havas, 8 Place de la Bourse 
Manchester, Eno. 92 Market Street 

Zurich, Switzerland - - - Louis Woll 

Orell Fussli & Co. 
Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00 
Great Britain, 8s. 6d., elsewhere - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address { W scri - P \- r°" d T 
I Adscript, Canada 



WEST'S BUSINESS SITUATION. 

Much nonsense is being talked about 
i he business situation in western Canada, 
not mily in the east, where it might be 
expect imI and excused because of lack of 
knowledge of conditions obaining at 
present, liul also in the west itself, where 
(here is little or no excuse for it. Be- 
cause the combination of a tight money 
market and a late and hence somewhat 
uncertain crop has resulted in checking, 
;il least temporarily, the rapid rise in 
real estate values, a few calamity howl- 
ers will insist on having it that the west 
i- mi the verge of commercial disaster. 
As a matter of fact, the checking of real 
estate speculation is the best thing that 
lias happened to t he west in recent years. 
and while it is, no doubt, causing some 
temporary inconvenience, il will very 
soon be generally recognized tis a bless- 
ing in disguise. 

The outlook is, of course, a little un- 
certain at the moment, but there is no 
reason for undue anxiety. The crop is 
late, but the answer of the west to the 
calamitj howlers, who insist that there 
will be no crop to harvest, is a call for 
21,000 men, and the railways are taking 
steps to secure the labor required. With 
favorable weather, there is now little 
doubt that a fairly good crop will be 
harvested. If the crop escapes the Sep- 
tember frosts there will be :i yield m 
Manitoba slightly below the average, an 
average yield in Saskatchewan, and the 
largest yield on record in Alberta. The 
price is certain to be much higher than 
Inst vear, and the farmer should have 



quite .i- much money from t lie sale of the 
L907 crop as tVom that of 3906. 

This is the hopeful outlook, and il 
seems the reasonable one, I f, however, 
;i good portion of the crop should be de- 
stroyed by frost, the west can stand it. 
Ten years ago (he result would have 

1 P ;' business panic, hut to-day the 

prosperit] of western Canada rests upon 
a hasis so slahle and secure that trouble 
of this kind could be endured. The west 
is able to stand a hard year if necessary, 
ami. as a matter of fact, a crop failure 
has already heen pretty generally dis- 
counted in advance. The next month 
will be an anxious lime, hut there is no 
excuse lor any undue excitement. 



THE PERCENTAGE OF PROFIT. 

A correspondent signing himself "Per- 
centage" sends an interesting- comment 
on the article under the above heading, 
published in Hardware and Metal, of 
July 20. lie contends that the ques- 
tions of profits and commissions were 
mixed and writes : 

''The lahles at the end are not ap- 
plicable to the i|iiestion taken up. They 
are (he basis of making from a net list 
a price list thai will be subject to the 
discounts named. Thai is, if you wanted 
lo make a price list and allow discounts 
of I'll per cent., you would add 25 per 
ciii . io the net price, etc. 

for example: 

Net price, .80; add 25 per cent., mak- 
ing list price +1.0(1; deduct discount of 
20 per cent., is a fifth, or .I'll, giving ih'I 
price of .80. 

Net price, .80; add 50 per cent., mak- 
ing list price $L20; deduct discount of 
.'>.'{ 1-3 per cent., is a third, or .40. giving 
net price of .80. 

Net price. .80; add 100 per cent., mak- 
ing list price $1.60; deduct discount 50 
per cent., is one-half, or .80. giving net 
price of .80. 

•"The answer given lo i he question: 
'An article bought for $10.00 and sold 
for $20.00. " is correct, as he realizes 100 
per cent., or 1 cent for every cent in- 
vested. Less than that percentage is a 
decimal of 1, for instance, 25 per cent. 
is .25 of 1. So that a merchant can and 
does often sell at even greater than 100 
per cent., as he can add any percentage 
In the i-nst ot goods. They will stand 
even to 200 nr 300 per cent, which il is 
neeessan I" do in some lines, such as 
drugs, etc., where the cost of service is 
a large item in the conduct of a busi 
n ess. 

••Tin • ■■ 

37 



a li"" in overlooking' that the com 

mission is dediictable from tic profits, 
and is paid on the price obtained We 

"ill pui the figures to another waj : A 
man buys a horae lor $50 and a 
to allow a broker 20 per cent, for its 
sale. What percentage of profli on on 

ginal cost does he make if broker sell- 
at $75 .' Answer, 20 per cent. 

"Sold at $75. Deduct commission, -JO 
pei' ceni.. $15, leaving $00. 

"C08l $50. Ad. I 20 per cent., -lo. 

totalling +(io. 

"If the question is altered to, What 
Shall I sell a horse at to gain 20 per 

cent., after paying a broker 20 per cent.? 

"Cost of horse, $50. Add 20 per 
cent., $10; total, $60. To deduct 20 add 
25 per cent., as shown above. $15, leav- 
ing selling price $75. 

"So (hat if a merchant wants to 
make a clear profit of any percentage. 
he must first add the cost of freight ami 
sidling expenses and then adil the per- 
centage of profit he wishes to make on 
the goods. " 



THE CURSE OF CHEAPNESS. 
A conference was recently convened in 

London by the Worshipful Company of 
Plumbers, the Master Plumbers' Associ- 
ation, to which were invited represen- 
tatives of the masters of other trade 
organizations, for the purpose of reviv- 
ing apprenticeships. 

Many diverse expressions of opinion 
were heard as to the. cause of the ad- 
mittedly poor craftsmanship of the pres- 
ent day. The master plumbers required 
an apprenticeship of seven years, but 
some of the members contended that 
I his term could he cut in half with ad- 
vantage, as most of the first three years 
was wasted, and ordinarily lads of the 
present day were not willing to wait so 
long for an opportunity to earn good 
wages, when an errand boy could do 
better than they while acquiring a 
trade. Another member declared that 
the poor work of the present day was 

the curse of cheapness, that as g 1 

craftsmen existed to-day as ever, but 
they were not given an opportunity to 
exercise their originality in carrying 
out work. 

'fhe lirst consensus of opinion appear- 
ed to be that apprenticeship should be 
revived of a reduced term, and that the 
apprentices should be given technical 
school training in conjunction with 
practical woi'k. A committee of promin- 
ent master- was appointed to formulate 
plans for carrying out the reforms 
ed. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Markets and Correspondence 



(For detailed prices see Current Market Quotations, page b2.) 



MARKETS IN BRIEF. 

Montreal. 

Antimony— Weak. 
Linseed Oil— Weak. 
Pig Iron— Firm. 

Spotting Goods — Season opens excep- 
tionally early. 
Tin— Strengtheoii 
Turpentine — Firm. 

Toronto. 

Antimony— In better demand. 
Copper— One-hall cent lower. 
Tin— Demand increasing. 
Linseed Oil— Weak. 
Turpentine— Steadier. 



TORONTO HARDWARE MARKETS. 

Toronto, Aug. 23. — A good August 
business is being done and, now that 
the traveling salesmen of local houses 
are again on the road, orders for all 
lines of seasonable hardware are arriv- 
ing in increasing numbers Erora all parts 
o! the province. As Ear as western trade 
oneerned, the amount, oE business 
booked Eor fall delivery is not as large 
as jobbers hoped it would be. On ac- 
count of the present stringency of the 
money market and the consequent 
tightening of the lines of credit by many 
eastern houses, western retailers are 
buying much more conservatively than 
last year and booked orders for the west 
consequently not as large as they 
otherwise would be. Local jobbers will 
be kept busy for the next couple of 
weeks entertaining their numerous re- 
tail customers from all parts of the 
country who usually make it a point to 
call on their jobbers here during the 
national exposition. The exposition, to- 
gether with the reduced railway rates. 
never fails to bring a large number of 
retailers to Toronto and by personal at- 
tention to these, local jobbers develop 
a closer acquaintance with their outside 
nicrs and incidentally book a con- 
siderable amount of business. 

Screws — Brass and bright screws in 
almost all sizes are still very scarce, but 
the manufacturers are daily gaining 
ground in catching up with the trade. 
Jobbers here are doing the best they 
can in the way of supplying customers 
bj only partially filling all large orders 
and holding the balance of the order to 
be filled as the supply of screws becomes 
greater. Instead of selling five hundred 
to one large concern, they cut 
that oider down to one hundred, and 
utilize the remaining four hundred gross 
to meet the demands of smaller ens 
tomers. 

N'ails The demand is good, with sup 
plies quite adequate to meet it. Prices 
continue firm at former figures. 

Wire— During the last llvr weeks there 
has been practically no wire selling and 
the manufacturers have bad a chance to 
:•' t a supply on hand to meet the fall 
demand, which usually sets in towards 
the end of September. 

Glass Trade is now much better > in 
I orders arc being received 



daily from many retailers who had not 
been previously booked. 

Building Materials and Supplies All 
hardware building supplies arc in strong 
demand and jobbers are experiencing a 
rd-breaking trade. Farmers are be- 
ginning to enquire about, cement and in- 
dications are that a hustling autumn 
trade will be transacted in Chis mated 
al. 

Sporting Goods— The ammunition and 
gun trade is opening up in splendid 
style. With the close approach of tin; 
game season, retailers should instruct 
their clerks to be on the alert and lose 
no opportunity to push this trade, hist 
at present in Toronto, on account of 
the Ontario Itille Matches being held 
here, sporting goods dealers report a 
good trade in verniers, orthoptics, 
cleaners, wood-cased ramrods, marks- 
men's caps, and other rifle-shooting re- 
quisites. Prices on the various lines of 
sporting goods remain unchanged. 

Fall Goods — The outlook is bright for 
a good autumn business. Booked orders 
for horse blankets, sleigh bells, axes 
and saws are exceptionally heavy and 
the additional orders for fall goods ar- 
riving from travelers make it an assur- 
ed fact that this autumn's trade will 
be much heavier than usual. 



MONTREAL HARDWARE MARKETS 

Montreal, Aug. 23.— Hardware mar- 
ket conditions are somewhat strengthen- 
ed this week. This trade, like all 
others, is subject to fluctuat'ions, whioh| 
though only slight, are sufficient some- 
times to cause a little discomfort and 
apprehension amongst the merchants. 
At present all the jobbing houses are 
exceptionally busy, some finding it ne- 
cessary to keep part of their staffs em- 
ployed until late at night. 

Carters are still in some cases asking 
exorbitant rates for delivery, and the 
merchants throughout the city will wel- 
come the day when the civic authorities 
give the Street Railway permission to 
handle freight. The present congestion 
of freight on the waterfront would be 
soon lifted, and trouble with cartage 
charges done away with. 

Prices on all lines are very firm and 
unchanged. 

Sporting Goods— The feature of the 
hardware trade at present is the ex- 
ceptionally early opening of the spott- 
ing goods trade. The retailers are get- 
ting in larger stocks this year and the 
outlook for this season's business is 
very hopeful. 

Poultry Netting— The demand main- 
tains itself splendidly for this season of 
i lie year. A diminution is generally 
looked foi now, but so far such antici- 
pations have not been realized. New 
discounts, 50 and 5 off. 

Screws— The factories are getting in 
a very much improved condition, ami 
they are making strong efforts to re- 
plete their stocks for the fall rush. Sup- 
plies of raw materia] are arriving much 
more freely. The shortage in small sizes 
is not so acute as formerly. 
Wire Goods— Prospects for this sea- 



son's trade are encouraging, as the hay 
crop in Quebec is expected to he heavy, 
thus creating a strong demand for hay 
haling material. 

Building Paper— Trade is steady. Prices 
ate firm and unchanged. The makers 
■ He endeavoring to enlarge their stocks 
lor the fall rush, as well as meet the 
current demand, and are consequently 
\ci\ busy. Raw material supplies at 
present are hardly adequate. 

Builders' Hardware and Mechanics' 
Tools— The trade in these throughout 
the year has been splendidly maintained. 
Supplies at present are adequate to the 
demand. 

Cement— The demand is moderate, with 
prospects of enlivcnment in a fortnight 
or more. The volume of business trans- 
acted in this line during the past sea- 
son will, in all probability, exceed .ill 
previous records. 



MONTREAL METAL MARKETS. 

Montreal, August 23.— With the ex- 
ception of pig iron the local market 
conditions are characterized generally 
by dullness. These conditions arc quite 
in consonance with those in the Ameri- 
can market, which are far from satis- 
factory or encouraging. Speculation is 
largely responsible for the depression 
prevailing in American circles and no 
doubt the fruit of speculation, money 
stringency, is doing much towards keep- 
ing local conditions in their present 
unsatisfactory state. The buying public 
have no confidence in the present prices 
and they have a suspicious hesitancy in 
buying up supplies. Absolute necessity 
is the only thing that can persuade 
them to buy these days. 

The English market is somewhat firm- 
er. Supplies are rather short, and 
strictly No. 1 qualities are hardly avail- 
able. 

American market prices even now arc 
considerably above English prices and 
consequently a large fraction of the 
supplies is being procured in England 
and Scotland, thus unusually diminish 
ing the stocks there. Moreover, the 
furnaces in England have not been work 
ing satisfactorily, and this accounts for 
the difficulty experienced by some 
American and local dealers in procuring 
supplies. 

Pig Iron — English brands are difficult 
to procure and prices are high. Locally, 
a heavy demand exists at present for 
all lines. They are not mere hand-to- 
mouth orders, but extensive, and such 
a- to guarantee safety for some time t,, 
come, Upwards of 10.000 tons have been 
bought during the past ten days or 
fortnight. Stagnation characterizes the. 
American situation. 

The Metal Worker (August 17) says : 

"The practical suspension of buying 
For all deliveries makes it extremely 
difficult to determine the actual level "I 
market prices. All indications, however, 
p. nut to further weakness. Tt is becom 
ing more and more apparent that found 
rv stocks are by no means depleted In 
fact, there is good reason to believe 



38 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



that work has slackened up sufficiently 
to stretch the supply of iron in inciters' 
yards over a Longer period than was an- 
ticipated. There is a decided lack of ttar- 
monj in sellers' views as to the out- 
look. Hut it is very evident that, on a 
linn inquiry lor desirable tonnage, prices 
considerably under those nominally 
quoted would be brought out. The 
market is barren of interest in first 
quarter requirements, for which no 
sales or inquiries arc reported." 

Pig Tin— In the local market this has 
lirmed a little, as it has in the English 
market, fn the United States it is still 
wr\ weak. We continue to quote. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits, $44. 

[ngof Copper— Large lots in the 
American market are sold at a reduc- 
tion. Prices are weak. The weakness in 
financial circles is largely responsible 
for the depression. 

Antimony — Continues weak. In the 
I mted States purchasers of large lots 
can secure this at reduced prices. Local 
prices are unchanged : Cookson's, 8c. 

( )ld Materials— The market continues 
weak. Further declines are noted on 
some lines this week. Heavy copper and 
wire, 15Ac; light copper, 14£c; heavy 
red brass, 14c; heavy yellow brass, 10£c; 
light brass, 7c. 



TORONTO METAL MARKETS. 

Toronto, Aug. 23.— Conditions on the 
Toronto metal markets have consider- 
ably improved during the past week, and 
it is quite evident that the low prices 
prevailing for the various metals are 
beginning to attract buyers. 

Anlimony— Sales have increased to a 
considerable degree during the week, the 
low price being responsible for much of 
this trade. There has been no further 
decline in local antimony prices this 
week; Cooksons is still quoted at 15c, 
and Hallett's at 14 -ic. The American 
market is dull, with very little doing 
and prices there are again easier. 

I'ig Iron— Business has improved con- 
siderably during the week, and n ore 
buyers are now in evidence for this 
metal. Local prices remain unchanged 
at figures previously quoted. 

Tin— The improved demand of the last 
few days is an evidence that many local 
consumers are beginning to reckon with 
the decline, and not a few consumers 
placed orders during the week in order 
to take advantage of present low prices. 
Lamb, (lag and straits ingot tin is still 
being quoted locally at from $42 to $44, 
though one large house is quoting slight- 
ly lower than these figures. As for the 
foreign situation, both the British and 
American markets are dull and, apart 
from the steady increase in the Austral- 
ian output, there is little of fresh inter- 
est regarding the metal. 

Lead — The demand for lead shows a 
slight increase over last week. Local 
prices are comparatively steady, im- 
ported pig lead being still quoted at 
$5.35. 

Copper — There has been an increased 
sale of copper locally ; casting ingot 
copper is quoted at 22c, and has at- 
tracted quite a number of local buyers 
at that price during the week. As for 
the American market, the past week 
has seen but little change in the copper 
metal market, although naturally some 
consumers there have been drawn into 
the market by the reduction in price 
and are making small purchases. The 



hig consumers, however, are still far 
i Kim being satisfied with conditions and 
are holding oft their big orders for a 
more stable market. The stagnation of 
the metal market is having its effect on 
the stock market, so that both the 
metal users and the stock brokers are 
anxious for some kind of a pen 
sett lenient of the controversy, and all 
efforts are being directed along that 
line. Meanwhile, the producers are con- 
tented , bhej are harboring then re 
sources for the demand which I lies know 
mu